• We present results of simulations of the climate of the newly discovered planet Proxima Centauri B, performed using the Met Office Unified Model (UM). We examine the responses of both an `Earth-like' atmosphere and simplified nitrogen and trace carbon dioxide atmosphere to the radiation likely received by Proxima Centauri B. Additionally, we explore the effects of orbital eccentricity on the planetary conditions using a range of eccentricities guided by the observational constraints. Overall, our results are in agreement with previous studies in suggesting Proxima Centauri B may well have surface temperatures conducive to the presence of liquid water. Moreover, we have expanded the parameter regime over which the planet may support liquid water to higher values of eccentricity (>= 0.1) and lower incident fluxes (881.7 Wm-2) than previous work. This increased parameter space arises because of the low sensitivity of the planet to changes in stellar flux, a consequence of the stellar spectrum and orbital configuration. However, we also find interesting differences from previous simulations, such as cooler mean surface temperatures for the tidally-locked case. Finally, we have produced high resolution planetary emission and reflectance spectra, and highlight signatures of gases vital to the evolution of complex life on Earth (oxygen, ozone and carbon dioxide).
  • To understand and compare the 3D atmospheric structure of HD 209458 b and HD 189733 b, focusing on the formation and distribution of cloud particles, as well as their feedback on the dynamics and thermal profile. We couple the 3D Met Office Unified Model (UM), including detailed treatments of atmospheric radiative transfer and dynamics, to a kinetic cloud formation scheme. The resulting model self--consistently solves for the formation of condensation seeds, surface growth and evaporation, gravitational settling and advection, cloud radiative feedback via absorption and, crucially, scattering. Fluxes directly obtained from the UM are used to produce synthetic SEDs and phase curves. Our simulations show extensive cloud formation in both planets, however, cooler temperatures in the HD 189733 b result in higher cloud particle number densities. Sub-micron particles are suspended by vertical flows leading to extensive upper-atmosphere cloud cover. A combination of meridional advection and efficient cloud formation in cooler high latitude regions, result in enhanced cloud coverage for latitudes > 30 degrees and leads to a zonally banded structure for all our simulations. The cloud bands extend around the entire planet(s), as the temperatures, even on the day side, remain below the condensation temperature of silicates and oxides. Therefore, our simulated optical phase curve for HD 209458 b shows no `offset', in contrast to observations. Efficient scattering by cloud results an atmospheric cooling of up to 250K, and an advection-driven fluctuating cloud opacity causes temporal variability in the thermal emission. The inclusion of this fundamental cloud-atmosphere radiative feedback leads to significant differences with approaches neglecting these physical elements and suggests both a note of caution of interpretations neglecting such cloud feedback and scattering, and merits further study.
  • Previous studies have demonstrated that continental carbon-silicate weathering is important to the continued habitability of a terrestrial planet. Despite this, few studies have considered the influence of land on the climate of a tidally-locked planet. In this work we use the Met Office Unified Model, coupled to a land surface model, to investigate the climate effects of a continent located at the sub-stellar point. We choose to use the orbital and planetary parameters of Proxima Centauri B as a template, to allow comparison with the work of others. A region of the surface where $T_{\text{s}} > 273.15\,\text{K}$ is always retained, and previous conclusions on the habitability of Proxima Centauri B remain intact. We find that sub-stellar land causes global cooling, and increases day-night temperature contrasts by limiting heat redistribution. Furthermore, we find that sub-stellar land is able to introduce a regime change in the atmospheric circulation. Specifically, when a continent offset to the east of the sub-stellar point is introduced, we observe the formation of two mid-latitude counterrotating jets, and a substantially weakened equatorial superrotating jet.
  • We present highlights from a large set of simulations of a hot Jupiter atmosphere, nominally based on HD 209458b, aimed at exploring both the evolution of the deep atmosphere, and the acceleration of the zonal flow or jet. We find the occurrence of a super-rotating equatorial jet is robust to changes in various parameters, and over long timescales, even in the absence of strong inner or bottom boundary drag. This jet is diminished in one simulation only, where we strongly force the deep atmosphere equator-to-pole temperature gradient over long timescales. Finally, although the eddy momentum fluxes in our atmosphere show similarities with the proposed mechanism for accelerating jets on tidally-locked planets, the picture appears more complex. We present tentative evidence for a jet driven by a combination of eddy momentum transport and mean flow.
  • To study the complexity of hot Jupiter atmospheres revealed by observations of increasing quality, we have adapted the UK Met Office global circulation model (GCM), the Unified Model (UM), to these exoplanets. The UM solves the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations with a height-varying gravity, avoiding the simplifications used in most GCMs currently applied to exoplanets. In this work we present the coupling of the UM dynamical core to an accurate radiation scheme based on the two-stream approximation and correlated-k method with state-of-the-art opacities from ExoMol. Our first application of this model is devoted to the extensively studied hot Jupiter HD 209458b. We have derived synthetic emission spectra and phase curves, and compare them to both previous models also based on state-of-the-art radiative transfer, and to observations. We find a reasonable a agreement between observations and both our day side emission and hot spot offset, however, our night side emission is too large. Overall our results are qualitatively similar to those found by Showman et al. (2009) with the SPARC/MITgcm, however, we note several quantitative differences: Our simulations show significant variation in the position of the hottest part of the atmosphere with pressure, as expected from simple timescale arguments, and in contrast to the "vertical coherency" found by Showman et al. (2009). We also see significant quantitative differences in calculated synthetic observations. Our comparisons strengthen the need for detailed intercomparisons of dynamical cores, radiation schemes and post-processing tools to understand these differences. This effort is necessary in order to make robust conclusions about these atmospheres based on GCM results.
  • We assess the multi-wavelength observable properties of the bow shock around a runaway early type star using a combination of hydrodynamical modelling, radiative transfer calculations and synthetic imaging. Instabilities associated with the forward shock produce dense knots of material which are warm, ionised and contain dust. These knots of material are responsible for the majority of emission at far infra-red, H alpha and radio wavelengths. The large scale bow shock morphology is very similar and differences are primarily due to variations in the assumed spatial resolution. However infra-red intensity slices (at 22 microns and 12 microns) show that the effects of a temperature gradient can be resolved at a realistic spatial resolution for an object at a distance of 1 kpc.
  • Radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations are used to study many astrophysical phenomena, however they require the use of simplified radiation transport and thermal prescriptions to reduce computational cost. In this paper we present a systematic study of the importance of microphysical processes in RHD simulations using the example of D-type HII region expansion. We compare the simplest hydrogen-only models with those that include: ionisation of H, He, C, N, O, S and Ne, different gas metallicity, non-LTE metal line blanketed stellar spectral models of varying metallicity, radiation pressure, dust and treatment of photodissociation regions. Each of these processes are explicitly treated using modern numerical methods rather than parameterisation. In line with expectations, changes due to microphysics in either the effective number of ionising photons or the thermal structure of the gas lead to differences in D-type expansion. In general we find that more realistic calculations lead to the onset of D-type expansion at smaller radii and a slower subsequent expansion. Simulations of star forming regions using simplified microphysics are therefore likely overestimating the strength of radiative feedback. We find that both variations in gas metallicity and the inclusion of dust can affect the ionisation front evolution at the 10-20 per cent level over 500kyr, which could substantially modify the results of simplified 3D models including feedback. Stellar metallicity, radiation pressure and the inclusion of photodissociation regions are all less significant effects at the 1 per cent level or less, rendering them of minor importance in the modelling the dynamical evolution of HII regions.
  • The arm structure of the Milky Way remains somewhat of an unknown, with observational studies hindered by our location within the Galactic disc. In the work presented here we use smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and radiative transfer to create synthetic longitude-velocity observations. Our aim is to reverse-engineer a top down map of the Galaxy by comparing synthetic longitude-velocity maps to those observed. We set up a system of N-body particles to represent the disc and bulge, allowing for dynamic creation of spiral features. Interstellar gas, and the molecular content, is evolved alongside the stellar system. A 3D-radiative transfer code is then used to compare the models to observational data. The resulting models display arm features that are a good reproduction of many of the observed emission structures of the Milky Way. These arms however are dynamic and transient, allowing for a wide range of morphologies not possible with standard density wave theory. The best fitting models are a much better match than previous work using fixed potentials. They favour a 4-armed model with a pitch angle of approximately 20 degrees, though with a pattern speed that decreases with increasing Galactic radius. Inner bars are lacking however, which appear required to fully reproduce the central molecular zone.
  • We present an investigation into the morphological features of the Milky Way. We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to simulate the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Milky Way under the effect of a number of different gravitational potentials representing spiral arms and bars, assuming the Milky Way is grand design in nature. The gas is subject to ISM cooling and chemistry, enabling us to track the evolution of molecular gas. We use a 3D radiative transfer code to simulate the emission from the SPH output, allowing for the construction of synthetic longitude-velocity (l-v) emission maps as viewed from the Earth. By comparing these maps with the observed emission in CO from the Milky Way, we infer the arm/bar geometry that provides a best fit to our Galaxy. We find that it is possible to reproduce nearly all features of the l-v diagram in CO emission. There is no model, however, that satisfactorily reproduces all of the features simultaneously. Models with 2 arms cannot reproduce all the observed arm features, while 4 armed models produce too bright local emission in the inner Galaxy. Our best fitting models favour a bar pattern speed within 50-60km/s/kpc and an arm pattern speed of approximately 20km/s/kpc, with a bar orientation of approximately 45 degrees and arm pitch angle between 10-15 degrees.
  • The treatment of radiation transport in global circulation models (GCMs) is crucial to correctly describe Earth and exoplanet atmospheric dynamics processes. The two-stream approximation and correlated-k method are currently state-of-the-art approximations applied in both Earth and hot Jupiter GCM radiation schemes to facilitate rapid calculation of fluxes and heating rates. Their accuracy have been tested extensively for Earth-like conditions, but verification of the methods' applicability to hot Jupiter-like conditions is lacking in the literature. We are adapting the UK Met Office GCM, the Unified Model (UM), for the study of hot Jupiters, and present in this work the adaptation of the Edwards-Slingo radiation scheme based on the two-stream approximation and the correlated-k method. We discuss the calculation of absorption coefficients from high temperature line lists and highlight the large uncertainty in the pressure-broadened line widths. We compare fluxes and heating rates obtained with our adapted scheme to more accurate discrete ordinate (DO) line-by-line (LbL) calculations ignoring scattering effects. We find that, in most cases, errors stay below 10 % for both heating rates and fluxes using ~ 10 k-coefficients in each band and a diffusivity factor D = 1.66. The two-stream approximation and the correlated-k method both contribute non-negligibly to the total error. We also find that using band-averaged absorption coefficients, which have previously been used in radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of a hot Jupiter, may yield errors of ~ 100 %, and should thus be used with caution.
  • We are adapting the Global Circulation Model (GCM) of the UK Met Office, the so--called Unified Model (UM), for the study of hot Jupiters. In this work we demonstrate the successful adaptation of the most sophisticated dynamical core, the component of the GCM which solves the equations of motion for the atmosphere, available within the UM, ENDGame (Even Newer Dynamics for General atmospheric modelling of the environment). Within the same numerical scheme ENDGame supports solution to the dynamical equations under varying degrees of simplification. We present results from a simple, shallow (in atmospheric domain) hot Jupiter model (SHJ), and a more realistic (with a deeper atmosphere) HD 209458b test case. For both test cases we find that the large--scale, time--averaged (over the 1200 days prescribed test period), dynamical state of the atmosphere is relatively insensitive to the level of simplification of the dynamical equations. However, problems exist when attempting to reproduce the results for these test cases derived from other models. For the SHJ case the lower (and upper) boundary intersects the dominant dynamical features of the atmosphere meaning the results are heavily dependent on the boundary conditions. For the HD 209458b test case, when using the more complete dynamical models, the atmosphere is still clearly evolving after 1200 days, and in a transient state. Solving the complete (deep atmosphere and non--hydrostatic) dynamical equations allows exchange between the vertical and horizontal momentum of the atmosphere, via Coriolis and metric terms. Subsequently, interaction between the upper atmosphere and the deeper more slowly evolving (radiatively inactive) atmosphere significantly alters the results, and acts over timescales longer than 1200 days.
  • We demonstrate that both the current (New Dynamics), and next generation (ENDGame) dynamical cores of the UK Met Office global circulation model, the UM, reproduce consistently, the long-term, large-scale flows found in several published idealised tests. The cases presented are the Held-Suarez test, a simplified model of Earth (including a stratosphere), and a hypothetical tidally locked Earth. Furthermore, we show that using simplifications to the dynamical equations, which are expected to be justified for the physical domains and flow regimes we have studied, and which are supported by the ENDGame dynamical core, also produces matching long-term, large-scale flows. Finally, we present evidence for differences in the detail of the planetary flows and circulations resulting from improvements in the ENDGame formulation over New Dynamics.
  • We investigate observational signatures of triggered star formation in bright rimmed clouds (BRCs) by using molecular line transfer calculations based on radiation-hydrodynamic radiatively-driven-implosion models. We find that for BRCs the separation in velocity between the line profile peak of an optically thick and an optically thin line is determined by both the observer viewing angle and the density of the shell driving into the cloud. In agreement with observations, we find that most BRC line profiles are symmetric and that asymmetries can be either red or blue, in contrast to the blue-dominance expected for a collapsing cloud. Asymmetries in the line profiles arise when an optically thick line is dominated by the shell and an optically thin line is dominated by the cloud interior to the shell. The asymmetries are red or blue depending on whether the shell is moving towards or away from the observer respectively. Using the known motions of the molecular gas in our models we rule out the envelope expansion with core collapse mechanism as the cause of the lack of blue-asymmetry in our simulated observations. We show that the absence of a strong photon dominated region (PDR) around a BRC may not rule out the presence of triggered star formation: if the BRC line profile has a strong blue component then the shell is expected to be driving towards the observer, suggesting that the cloud is being viewed from behind and the PDR is obstructed. This could explain why BRCs such as SFO 80, 81 and 86 have a blue secondary peak and only a weak PDR inferred at 8 microns. Finally we also test the use of 12CO, 13CO and C18O as diagnostics of cloud mass, temperature and column density. We find that the inferred conditions are in reasonable agreement with those from the models.
  • One of the main reasons that triggered star formation is contentious is the failure to accurately link the observations with models in a detailed, quantitative, way. It is therefore critical to continuously test and improve the model details and methods with which comparisons to observations are made. We use a Monte Carlo radiation transport and hydrodynamics code TORUS to show that the diffuse radiation field has a significant impact on the outcome of radiatively driven implosion (RDI) models. We also calculate SEDs and synthetic images from the models to test observational diagnostics that are used to determine bright rimmed cloud conditions and search for signs of RDI.
  • We produce synthetic images and SEDs from radiation hydrodynamical simulations of radiatively driven implosion. The synthetically imaged bright rimmed clouds (BRCs) are morphologically similar to those observed in star forming regions. Using nebular diagnostic line-ratios, simulated Very Large Array (VLA) radio images, H{\alpha} imaging and SED fitting we compute the neutral cloud and ionized boundary layer gas densities and temperatures and perform a virial stability analysis for each model cloud. We determine that the neutral cloud temperatures derived by SED fitting are hotter than the dominant neutral cloud temperature by 1 - 2 K due to emission from warm dust. This translates into a change in the calculated cloud mass by 8-35 %. Using a constant mass conversion factor (C{\nu}) for BRCs of different class is found to give rise to errors in the cloud mass of up to a factor of 3.6. The ionized boundary layer (IBL) electron temperature calculated using diagnostic line ratios is more accurate than assuming the canonical value adopted for radio diagnostics of 10^4 K. Both radio diagnostics and diagnostic line ratios are found to underestimate the electron density in the IBL. Each system is qualitatively correctly found to be in a state in which the pressure in the ionized boundary layer is greater than the supporting cloud pressure, implying that the objects are being compressed. We find that observationally derived mass loss estimates agree with those on the simulation grid and introduce the concept of using the mass loss flux to give an indication of the relative strength of photo-evaporative flow between clouds. The effect of beam size on these diagnostics in radio observations is found to be a mixing of the bright rim and ambient cloud and HII region fluxes, which leads to an underestimate of the cloud properties relative to a control diagnostic.
  • We present derived stellar and disc parameters for a sample of Taurus brown dwarfs both with and without evidence of an associated disc. These parameters have been derived using an online fitting tool (http://bd-server.astro.ex.ac.uk/), which includes a statistically robust derivation of uncertainties, an indication of pa- rameter degeneracies, and a complete treatment of the input photometric and spectroscopic observations. The observations of the Taurus members with indications of disc presence have been fitted using a grid of theoretical models including detailed treatments of physical processes accepted for higher mass stars, such as dust sublimation, and a simple treatment of the accretion flux. This grid of models has been designed to test the validity of the adopted physical mechanisms, but we have also constructed models using parameterisation, for example semi-empirical dust sublimation radii, for users solely interested in parameter derivation and the quality of the fit. The parameters derived for the naked and disc brown dwarf systems are largely consistent with literature observations. However, our inner disc edge locations are consistently closer to the star than previous results and we also derive elevated accretion rates over non-SED based accretion rate derivations. For inner edge locations we attribute these differences to the detailed modelling we have performed of the disc structure, particularly at the crucial inner edge where departures in geometry from the often adopted vertical wall due to dust sublimation (and therefore accretion flux) can compensate for temperature (and therefore distance) changes to the inner edge of the dust disc. In the case of the elevated derived accretion rates, in some cases, this may be caused by the intrinsic stellar luminosities of the targets exceeding that predicted by the isochrones we have adopted.
  • We generate synthetic HI Galactic plane surveys from spiral galaxy simulations which include stellar feedback processes. Compared to a model without feedback we find an increased scale height of HI emission (in better agreement with observations) and more realistic spatial structure (including supernova blown bubbles). The synthetic data show HI self-absorption with a morphology similar to that seen in observations. The density and temperature of the material responsible for HI self-absorption is consistent with observationally determined values, and is found to be only weakly dependent on absorption strength and star formation efficiency.
  • We present the first non-LTE, co-moving frame molecular line calculations of a star-forming cluster simulated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), from which we derive high-resolution synthetic observations. We have resampled a particle representation onto an adaptive mesh and self-consistently solved the equations of statistical equilibrium in the co-moving frame, using TORUS, a three-dimensional adaptive mesh refined (AMR) radiative transfer (RT) code. We verified the applicability of the code to the conditions of the SPH simulation by testing its output against other codes. We find that the level populations obtained for optically thick and thin scenarios closely match the ensemble average of the other codes. We have used the code to obtain non-LTE level populations of multiple molecular species throughout the cluster and have created three-dimensional velocity-resolved spatial maps of the emergent intensity. Line profiles of cores traced by N2H+ (1-0) are compared to probes of low density gas, 13CO (1-0) and C18O (1-0), surrounding the cores along the line of sight. The relative differences of the line-centre velocities are shown to be small compared to the velocity dispersion, matching recent observations. We conclude that one cannot reject competitive accretion as a viable theory of star formation based on observed velocity profiles.
  • We have created synthetic neutral hydrogen (HI) Galactic Plane Survey data cubes covering 90 degrees < l < 180 degrees, using a model spiral galaxy from SPH simulations and the radiative transfer code TORUS. The density, temperature and other physical parameters are fed from the SPH simulation into TORUS, where the HI emissivity and opacity are calculated before the 21-cm line emission profile is determined. Our main focus is the observation of Outer Galaxy `Perseus Arm' HI, with a view to tracing atomic gas as it encounters shock motions as it enters a spiral arm interface, an early step in the formation of molecular clouds. The observation of HI self-absorption features at these shock sites (in both real observations and our synthetic data) allows us to investigate further the connection between cold atomic gas and the onset of molecular cloud formation.
  • Using the Torus radiative transfer code we produce synthetic observations of the 21 cm neutral hydrogen line from an SPH simulation of a spiral galaxy. The SPH representation of the galaxy is mapped onto an AMR grid, and a ray tracing method is used to calculate 21 cm line emission for lines of sight through the AMR grid in different velocity channels and spatial pixels. The result is a synthetic spectral cube which can be directly compared to real observations. We compare our synthetic spectral cubes to observations of M31 and M33 and find good agreement, whereby increasing velocity channels trace the main disc of the galaxy. The synthetic data also show kinks in the velocity across the spiral arms, evidence of non-circular velocities. These are still present even when we blur our data to a similar resolution as the observations, but largely absent in M31 and M33, indicating those galaxies do not contain significant spiral shocks. Thus the detailed velocity structure of our maps better represent previous observations of the grand design spiral M81.
  • We present results from combining a grid-based radiative transfer code with a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code to produce a flexible system for modelling radiation hydrodynamics. We use a benchmark model of a circumstellar disc to determine a robust method for constructing a gridded density distribution from SPH particles. The benchmark disc is then used to determine the accuracy of the radiative transfer results. We find that the SED and the temperature distribution within the disc are sensitive to the representation of the disc inner edge, which depends critically on both the grid and SPH resolution. The code is then used to model a circumstellar disc around a T-Tauri star. As the disc adjusts towards equilibrium vertical motions in the disc are induced resulting in scale height enhancements which intercept radiation from the central star. Vertical transport of radiation enables these perturbations to influence the mid-plane temperature of the disc. The vertical motions decay over time and the disc ultimately reaches a state of simultaneous hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium.
  • We present results from a series of hydrodynamic simulations investigating ram pressure stripping of galactic haloes as the host galaxy falls radially into a cluster. We perform a parameter study comprising of variations in initial gas content, gas injection rate (via stellar mass loss processes), galaxy mass and amplitude of infall. From the simulation results we track variations in both physical quantities (e.g. gas mass) and directly observable quantities (e.g. X-ray luminosities). The luminosity of the galaxy's X-ray halo is found to compare favourably with the observationally determined correlation with optical blue band luminosity (L_X:L_B) relation. Factors affecting the X-ray luminosity are explored and it is found that the gas injection rate is a dominant factor in determining the integrated luminosity. Observational properties of the material stripped from the galaxy, which forms an X-ray wake, are investigated and it is found that wakes are most visible around galaxies with a substantial initial gas content, during their first passage though the cluster. We define a statistical skewness measure which may be used to determine the direction of motion of a galaxy using X-ray observations. Structures formed in these simulations are similar to the cold fronts seen in observation of cluster mergers where a sharp increase in surface brightness is accompanied by a transition to a cooler region.
  • The dynamical signatures of the interaction between galaxies in clusters and the intracluster medium (ICM) can potentially yield significant information about the structure and dynamical history of clusters. To develop our understanding of this phenomenon we present results from numerical modelling of the galaxy/ICM interaction, as the galaxy moves through the cluster. The simulations have been performed for a broad range, of ICM temperatures (kT = 1,4 and 8 keV), representative of poor clusters or groups through to rich clusters. There are several dynamical features that can be identified in these simulations; for supersonic galaxy motion, a leading bow-shock is present, and also a weak gravitationally focussed wake or tail behind the galaxy (analogous to Bondi-Hoyle accretion). For galaxies with higher mass-replenishment rates and a denser interstellar medium (ISM), the dominant feature is a dense ram-pressure stripped tail. In line with other simulations, we find that the ICM/galaxy ISM interaction can result in complex time- dependent dynamics, with ram-pressure stripping occurring in an episodic manner. In order to facilitate this comparison between the observational consequences of dynamical studies and X-ray observations we have calculated synthetic X-ray flux and hardness maps from these simulations. These calculations predict that the ram-pressure stripped tail will usually be the most visible feature, though in nearby galaxies the bow-shock preceding the galaxy should also be apparent in deeper X-ray observations. We briefly discuss these results and compare with X-ray observations of galaxies where there is evidence of such interactions.