• We compute upper limits on the nanohertz-frequency isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (GWB) using the 9-year data release from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration. We set upper limits for a GWB from supermassive black hole binaries under power law, broken power law, and free spectral coefficient GW spectrum models. We place a 95\% upper limit on the strain amplitude (at a frequency of yr$^{-1}$) in the power law model of $A_{\rm gw} < 1.5\times 10^{-15}$. For a broken power law model, we place priors on the strain amplitude derived from simulations of Sesana (2013) and McWilliams et al. (2014). We find that the data favor a broken power law to a pure power law with odds ratios of 22 and 2.2 to one for the McWilliams and Sesana prior models, respectively. The McWilliams model is essentially ruled out by the data, and the Sesana model is in tension with the data under the assumption of a pure power law. Using the broken power-law analysis we construct posterior distributions on environmental factors that drive the binary to the GW-driven regime including the stellar mass density for stellar-scattering, mass accretion rate for circumbinary disk interaction, and orbital eccentricity for eccentric binaries, marking the first time that the shape of the GWB spectrum has been used to make astrophysical inferences. We then place the most stringent limits so far on the energy density of relic GWs, $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)\,h^2 < 4.2 \times 10^{-10}$, yielding a limit on the Hubble parameter during inflation of $H_*=1.6\times10^{-2}~m_{Pl}$, where $m_{Pl}$ is the Planck mass. Our limit on the cosmic string GWB, $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)\, h^2 < 2.2 \times 10^{-10}$, translates to a conservative limit of $G\mu<3.3\times 10^{-8}$ - a factor of 4 better than the joint Planck and high-$l$ CMB data from other experiments.
  • We analyze timing noise from five years of Arecibo and Green Bank observations of the seventeen millisecond pulsars of the North-American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) pulsar timing array. The weighted autocovariance of the timing residuals was computed for each pulsar and compared against two possible models for the underlying noise process. The first model includes red noise and predicts the autocovariance to be a decaying exponential as a function of time lag. The second model is Gaussian white noise whose autocovariance would be a delta function. We also perform a ``nearest-neighbor" correlation analysis. We find that the exponential process does not accurately describe the data. Two pulsars, J1643-1224 and J1910+1256, exhibit weak red noise, but the rest are well described as white noise. The overall lack of evidence for red noise implies that sensitivity to a (red) gravitational wave background signal is limited by statistical rather than systematic uncertainty. In all pulsars, the ratio of non-white noise to white noise is low, so that we can increase the cadence or integration times of our observations and still expect the root-mean-square of timing residual averages to decrease by the square-root of observation time, which is key to improving the sensitivity of the pulsar timing array.
  • We study statistical properties of stochastic variations in pulse arrival times, timing noise, in radio pulsars using a new analysis method applied in the time domain. The method proceeds in two steps. First, we subtract low-frequency wander using a high-pass filter. Second, we calculate the discrete correlation function of the filtered data. As a complementary method for measuring correlations, we introduce a statistic that measures the dispersion of the data with respect to the data translated in time. The analysis methods presented here are robust and of general usefulness for studying arrival time variations over timescales approaching the average sampling interval. We apply these methods to timing data for 32 pulsars. In two radio pulsars, PSRs B1133+16 and B1933+16, we find that fluctuations in arrival times are correlated over timescales of 10 - 20 d with the distinct signature of a relaxation process. Though this relaxation response could be magnetospheric in origin, we argue that damping between the neutron star crust and interior liquid is a more likely explanation. Under this interpretation, our results provide the first evidence independent from pulsar spin glitches of differential rotation in neutron stars. PSR B0950+08, shows evidence for quasi-periodic oscillations that could be related to mode switching.
  • More than four decades after the discovery of pulsars, the composition of matter at their cores is still a mystery. This white paper summarizes how recent high-precision measurements of millisecond pulsar masses have introduced new experimental constraints on the properties of super-dense matter, and how continued timing of intriguing new objects, coupled with radio telescope surveys to discover more pulsars, might introduce significantly more stringent constraints.
  • We present results of long-term timing of eclipsing binaries PSR B1744-24A and PSR B1957+20 at Arecibo, the VLA, and Green Bank. Both pulsars exhibit irregularities in pulsar rotation and orbital motion. Increases and decreases of the orbital period of PSR B1957+20 are of order Delta-P_b/P_b ~ 10^-7, varying on a time scale of a few years. Over a decade of observations, the orbital period of PSR B1744-24A has only decreased, with time scale |P_b/P_b-dot| ~ 200 Myr. When the effects of orbital motion are removed from the timing data, long-term trends remain in the pulse phase residuals, with amplitudes of order 30 and 500 us, respectively, for B1957+20 and B1744-24A. Such large "timing noise" is not seen in other spun-up pulsars (isolated or binary), leading us to conclude that it is a consequence of mass flow in the system. Possible causes include variations in the rotation of the pulsars and movement of the binary systems along the line of sight (perhaps due to gravitational interactions with outflowing matter).