• In this paper, we report new limits on 21cm emission from cosmic reionization based on a 135-day observing campaign with a 64-element deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. This work extends the work presented in Parsons et al. (2014) with more collecting area, a longer observing period, improved redundancy-based calibration, optimal fringe-rate filtering, and improved power-spectral analysis using optimal quadratic estimators. The result is a new $2\sigma$ upper limit on $\Delta^{2}(k)$ of (22.4 mK)$^2$ in the range $0.15 < k < 0.5h\ {\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ at $z = 8.4$. This represents a three-fold improvement over the previous best upper limit. As we discuss in more depth in a forthcoming paper (Pober et al. 2015, in prep), this upper limit supports and extends previous evidence against extremely cold reionization scenarios. We conclude with a discussion of implications for future 21cm reionization experiments, including the newly funded Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). $\textbf{The limits presented in this paper have been retracted: The erratum can be found in Appendix A.}$
  • Foreground power dominates the measurements of interferometers that seek a statistical detection of highly-redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The inherent spectral smoothness of synchrotron radiation, the dominant foreground emission mechanism, and the chromaticity of the instrument allows these experiments to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth and structured emission in Fourier space (the "wedge" or "pitchfork", and the "EoR Window", respectively). Faraday rotation can inject spectral structure into otherwise smooth polarized foreground emission, which through instrument effects or miscalibration could possibly pollute the EoR Window. Using data from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) 19-element commissioning array, we investigate the polarization response of this new instrument in the power spectrum domain. We confirm the expected structure of foreground emission in Fourier space predicted by Thyagarajan et al. (2015a, 2016) for a HERA-type dish, and detect polarized power within the pitchfork. Using simulations of the polarized response of HERA feeds, we find that almost all of the power in Stokes Q, U and V can be attributed to instrumental leakage effects. Power consistent with noise in the EoR window suggests a negligible amount of spectrally-structured polarized power, to the noise-levels attained. This lends confidence to deep integrations with HERA in the future, but with a lower noise floor these future studies will also have to investigate their polarized response.
  • The experimental efforts to detect the redshifted 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are limited predominantly by the chromatic instrumental systematic effect. The delay spectrum methodology for 21 cm power spectrum measurements brought new attention to the critical impact of an antenna's chromaticity on the viability of making this measurement. This methodology established a straightforward relationship between time-domain response of an instrument and the power spectrum modes accessible to a 21 cm EoR experiment. We examine the performance of a prototype of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) array element that is currently observing in Karoo desert, South Africa. We present a mathematical framework to derive the beam integrated frequency response of a HERA prototype element in reception from the return loss measurements between 100-200 MHz and determined the extent of additional foreground contamination in the delay space. The measurement reveals excess spectral structures in comparison to the simulation studies of the HERA element. Combined with the HERA data analysis pipeline that incorporates inverse covariance weighting in optimal quadratic estimation of power spectrum, we find that in spite of its departure from the simulated response, HERA prototype element satisfies the necessary criteria posed by the foreground attenuation limits and potentially can measure the power spectrum at spatial modes as low as $k_{\parallel} > 0.1h$~Mpc$^{-1}$. The work highlights a straightforward method for directly measuring an instrument response and assessing its impact on 21 cm EoR power spectrum measurements for future experiments that will use reflector-type antenna.
  • The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a radio interferometer aiming to detect the power spectrum of 21 cm fluctuations from neutral hydrogen from the Epoch of Reionization (EOR). Drawing on lessons from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), HERA is a hexagonal array of large (14 m diameter) dishes with suspended dipole feeds. Not only does the dish determine overall sensitivity, it affects the observed frequency structure of foregrounds in the interferometer. This is the first of a series of four papers characterizing the frequency and angular response of the dish with simulations and measurements. We focus in this paper on the angular response (i.e., power pattern), which sets the relative weighting between sky regions of high and low delay, and thus, apparent source frequency structure. We measure the angular response at 137 MHz using the ORBCOMM beam mapping system of Neben et al. We measure a collecting area of 93 m^2 in the optimal dish/feed configuration, implying HERA-320 should detect the EOR power spectrum at z~9 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.7 using a foreground avoidance approach with a single season of observations, and 74.3 using a foreground subtraction approach. Lastly we study the impact of these beam measurements on the distribution of foregrounds in Fourier space.
  • The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a staged experiment to measure 21 cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) throughout cosmic reionization ($z=6-12$), and to explore earlier epochs of our Cosmic Dawn ($z\sim30$). During these epochs, early stars and black holes heated and ionized the IGM, introducing fluctuations in 21 cm emission. HERA is designed to characterize the evolution of the 21 cm power spectrum to constrain the timing and morphology of reionization, the properties of the first galaxies, the evolution of large-scale structure, and the early sources of heating. The full HERA instrument will be a 350-element interferometer in South Africa consisting of 14-m parabolic dishes observing from 50 to 250 MHz. Currently, 19 dishes have been deployed on site and the next 18 are under construction. HERA has been designated as an SKA Precursor instrument. In this paper, we summarize HERA's scientific context and provide forecasts for its key science results. After reviewing the current state of the art in foreground mitigation, we use the delay-spectrum technique to motivate high-level performance requirements for the HERA instrument. Next, we present the HERA instrument design, along with the subsystem specifications that ensure that HERA meets its performance requirements. Finally, we summarize the schedule and status of the project. We conclude by suggesting that, given the realities of foreground contamination, current-generation 21 cm instruments are approaching their sensitivity limits. HERA is designed to bring both the sensitivity and the precision to deliver its primary science on the basis of proven foreground filtering techniques, while developing new subtraction techniques to unlock new capabilities. The result will be a major step toward realizing the widely recognized scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology.
  • We present a measurement of the abundance of carbon monoxide in the early Universe, utilizing the final results from the CO Power Spectrum Survey (COPSS). Between 2013 and 2015, we performed observations with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA) to measure the aggregate CO emission from $z\sim3$ galaxies with the intensity mapping technique. Data were collected on 19 fields, covering an area of 0.7 square degrees, over a frequency range of 27 to 35 GHz. With these data, along with data analyzed in COPSS I, we are able to observe the CO(1-0) transition in the redshift range of $z=2.3-3.3$ for spatial frequencies between $k=0.5-10\ h\,\textrm{Mpc}^{-1}$, spanning a comoving volume of $4.9\times10^{6}\ h^{-3}\,\textrm{Mpc}^{3}$. We present estimates of contributions from continuum sources and ground illumination within our measurement. We constrain the amplitude of the CO power spectrum to be $P_{\textrm{CO}}=3.0_{-1.3}^{+1.3}\times10^{3}\ \mu\textrm{K}^{2} (h^{-1}\,\textrm{Mpc})^{3}$, or $\Delta^{2}_{\textrm{CO}}(k\!=\!1\ h\,\textrm{Mpc}^{-1})=1.5^{+0.7}_{-0.7} \times10^{3}\ \mu\textrm{K}^{2}$, at 68% confidence, and $P_{\textrm{CO}}>0$ at 98.9% confidence. These results are a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity compared to the previous limits set in COPSS I. We use this measurement to place constraints on the CO(1-0) galaxy luminosity function at $z\sim3$. We constrain the ratio of CO(1-0) luminosity to host halo mass to $A_{\textrm{CO}}=6.3_{-2.1}^{+1.4}\times10^{-7}\ L_{\odot}\ M_{\odot}^{-1}$, and estimate a mass fraction of molecular gas of $f_{\textrm{H}_{2}}=5.5^{+3.4}_{-2.2}\times10^{-2}$ for halos with masses of order $10^{12}M_{\odot}$. Using simple theoretical estimates for the scaling of molecular gas mass fraction and halo mass, we estimate the global density of molecular gas to be $\rho_{z\sim3}(\textrm{H}_{2})=1.1_{-0.4}^{+0.7}\times10^{8}\ M_{\odot}\ \textrm{Mpc}^{-3}$.
  • We present constraints on the abundance of carbon-monoxide in the early Universe from the CO Power Spectrum Survey (COPSS). We utilize a data set collected between 2005 and 2008 using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA), which were previously used to measure arcminute-scale fluctuations of the CMB. This data set features observations of 44 fields, covering an effective area of 1.7 square degrees, over a frequency range of 27 to 35 GHz. Using the technique of intensity mapping, we are able to probe the CO(1-0) transition, with sensitivity to spatial modes between $k=0.5{-}2\ h\,\textrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ over a range in redshift of $z=2.3{-}3.3$, spanning a comoving volume of $3.6\times10^{6}\ h^{-3}\,\textrm{Mpc}^{3}$. We demonstrate our ability to mitigate foregrounds, and present estimates of the impact of continuum sources on our measurement. We constrain the CO power spectrum to $P_{\textrm{CO}}<2.6\times10^{4}\ \mu\textrm{K}^{2} (h^{-1}\,\textrm{Mpc})^{3}$, or $\Delta^{2}_{\textrm{CO}}(k\! = \! 1 \ h\,\textrm{Mpc}^{-1})<1.3 \times10^{3}\ \mu\textrm{K}^{2}$, at $95\%$ confidence. This limit resides near optimistic predictions for the CO power spectrum. Under the assumption that CO emission is proportional to halo mass during bursts of active star formation, this corresponds to a limit on the ratio of $\textrm{CO}(1{-}0)$ luminosity to host halo mass of $A_{\textrm{CO}}<1.2\times10^{-5}\ L_{\odot}\ M_{\odot}^{-1}$. Further assuming a Milky Way-like conversion factor between CO luminosity and molecular gas mass ($\alpha_{\textrm{CO}}=4.3\ M_{\odot}\ (\textrm{K}\ \textrm{km}\ \textrm{s}^{-1}\ \textrm{pc}^{-2})^{-1}$), we constrain the global density of molecular gas to $\rho_{z\sim3}(M_{\textrm{H}_{2}})\leq 2.8 \times10^{8}\ M_{\odot}\ \textrm{Mpc}^{-3}$.
  • We present constraints on both the kinetic temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z=8.4, and on models for heating the IGM at high-redshift with X-ray emission from the first collapsed objects. These constraints are derived using a semi-analytic method to explore the new measurements of the 21 cm power spectrum from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), which were presented in a companion paper, Ali et al. (2015). Twenty-one cm power spectra with amplitudes of hundreds of mK^2 can be generically produced if the kinetic temperature of the IGM is significantly below the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB); as such, the new results from PAPER place lower limits on the IGM temperature at z=8.4. Allowing for the unknown ionization state of the IGM, our measurements find the IGM temperature to be above ~5 K for neutral fractions between 10% and 85%, above ~7 K for neutral fractions between 15% and 80%, or above ~10 K for neutral fractions between 30% and 70%. We also calculate the heating of the IGM that would be provided by the observed high redshift galaxy population, and find that for most models, these galaxies are sufficient to bring the IGM temperature above our lower limits. However, there are significant ranges of parameter space that could produce a signal ruled out by the PAPER measurements; models with a steep drop-off in the star formation rate density at high redshifts or with relatively low values for the X-ray to star formation rate efficiency of high redshift galaxies are generally disfavored. The PAPER measurements are consistent with (but do not constrain) a hydrogen spin temperature above the CMB temperature, a situation which we find to be generally predicted if galaxies fainter than the current detection limits of optical/NIR surveys are included in calculations of X-ray heating.
  • The vast collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), harnessed by sensitive receivers, flexible digital electronics and increased computational capacity, could permit the most sensitive and exhaustive search for technologically-produced radio emission from advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) ever performed. For example, SKA1-MID will be capable of detecting a source roughly analogous to terrestrial high-power radars (e.g. air route surveillance or ballistic missile warning radars, EIRP (EIRP = equivalent isotropic radiated power, ~10^17 erg sec^-1) at 10 pc in less than 15 minutes, and with a modest four beam SETI observing system could, in one minute, search every star in the primary beam out to ~100 pc for radio emission comparable to that emitted by the Arecibo Planetary Radar (EIRP ~2 x 10^20 erg sec^-1). The flexibility of the signal detection systems used for SETI searches with the SKA will allow new algorithms to be employed that will provide sensitivity to a much wider variety of signal types than previously searched for. Here we discuss the astrobiological and astrophysical motivations for radio SETI and describe how the technical capabilities of the SKA will explore the radio SETI parameter space. We detail several conceivable SETI experimental programs on all components of SKA1, including commensal, primary-user, targeted and survey programs and project the enhancements to them possible with SKA2. We also discuss target selection criteria for these programs, and in the case of commensal observing, how the varied use cases of other primary observers can be used to full advantage for SETI.
  • A number of experiments are currently working towards a measurement of the 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization. Whether or not these experiments deliver a detection of cosmological emission, their limited sensitivity will prevent them from providing detailed information about the astrophysics of reionization. In this work, we consider what types of measurements will be enabled by a next-generation of larger 21 cm EoR telescopes. To calculate the type of constraints that will be possible with such arrays, we use simple models for the instrument, foreground emission, and the reionization history. We focus primarily on an instrument modeled after the $\sim 0.1~\rm{km}^2$ collecting area Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) concept design, and parameterize the uncertainties with regard to foreground emission by considering different limits to the recently described "wedge" footprint in k-space. Uncertainties in the reionization history are accounted for using a series of simulations which vary the ionizing efficiency and minimum virial temperature of the galaxies responsible for reionization, as well as the mean free path of ionizing photons through the IGM. Given various combinations of models, we consider the significance of the possible power spectrum detections, the ability to trace the power spectrum evolution versus redshift, the detectability of salient power spectrum features, and the achievable level of quantitative constraints on astrophysical parameters. Ultimately, we find that $0.1~\rm{km}^2$ of collecting area is enough to ensure a very high significance ($\gtrsim30\sigma$) detection of the reionization power spectrum in even the most pessimistic scenarios. This sensitivity should allow for meaningful constraints on the reionization history and astrophysical parameters, especially if foreground subtraction techniques can be improved and successfully implemented.
  • The epoch of reionization power spectrum is expected to evolve strongly with redshift, and it is this variation with cosmic history that will allow us to begin to place constraints on the physics of reionization. The primary obstacle to the measurement of the EoR power spectrum is bright foreground emission. We present an analysis of observations from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) telescope which place new limits on the HI power spectrum over the redshift range of $7.5<z<10.5$, extending previously published single redshift results to cover the full range accessible to the instrument. To suppress foregrounds, we use filtering techniques that take advantage of the large instrumental bandwidth to isolate and suppress foreground leakage into the interesting regions of $k$-space. Our 500 hour integration is the longest such yet recorded and demonstrates this method to a dynamic range of $10^4$. Power spectra at different points across the redshift range reveal the variable efficacy of the foreground isolation. Noise limited measurements of $\Delta^2$ at $k=$0.2hMpc$^{-1}$ and z$=7.55$ reach as low as (48mK)$^2$ ($1\sigma$). We demonstrate that the size of the error bars in our power spectrum measurement as generated by a bootstrap method is consistent with the fluctuations due to thermal noise. Relative to this thermal noise, most spectra exhibit an excess of power at a few sigma. The likely sources of this excess include residual foreground leakage, particularly at the highest redshift, and unflagged RFI. We conclude by discussing data reduction improvements that promise to remove much of this excess.
  • We present new constraints on the 21cm Epoch of Reionization (EoR) power spectrum derived from 3 months of observing with a 32-antenna, dual-polarization deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficacy of the delay-spectrum approach to avoiding foregrounds, achieving over 8 orders of magnitude of foreground suppression (in $\textrm{mK}^2$). Combining this approach with a procedure for removing off-diagonal covariances arising from instrumental systematics, we achieve a best 2-sigma upper limit of $(41\,\textrm{mK})^2$ for $k=0.27 h\textrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ at $z=7.7$. This limit falls within an order of magnitude of the brighter predictions of the expected 21cm EoR signal level. Using the upper limits set by these measurements, we generate new constraints on the brightness temperature of 21cm emission in neutral regions for various reionization models. We show that for several ionization scenarios, our measurements are inconsistent with cold reionization. That is, heating of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) is necessary to remain consistent with the constraints we report. Hence, we have suggestive evidence that by $z=7.7$, the HI has been warmed from its cold primordial state, probably by X-rays from high-mass X-ray binaries or mini-quasars. The strength of this evidence depends on the ionization state of the IGM, which we are not yet able to constrain. This result is consistent with standard predictions for how reionization might have proceeded.
  • We present a catalog of spectral measurements covering a 100-200 MHz band for 32 sources, derived from observations with a 64-antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. For transit telescopes such as PAPER, calibration of the primary beam is a difficult endeavor, and errors in this calibration are a major source of error in the determination of source spectra. In order to decrease reliance on accurate beam calibration, we focus on calibrating sources in a narrow declination range from -46d to -40d. Since sources at similar declinations follow nearly identical paths through the primary beam, this restriction greatly reduces errors associated with beam calibration, yielding a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of derived source spectra. Extrapolating from higher frequency catalogs, we derive the flux scale using a Monte-Carlo fit across multiple sources that includes uncertainty from both catalog and measurement errors. Fitting spectral models to catalog data and these new PAPER measurements, we derive new flux models for Pictor A and 31 other sources at nearby declinations. 90% of these confirm and refine a power-law model for flux density. Of note is the new Pictor A flux model, which is accurate to 1.4% and shows, in contrast to previous models, that between 100 MHz and 2 GHz, the spectrum of Pictor A is consistent with a single power law given by a flux at 150 MHz of 382+/-5.4 Jy, and a spectral index of -0.76+/-0.01. This accuracy represents an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements in this band, and is limited by the uncertainty in the catalog measurements used to estimate the absolute flux scale. The simplicity and improved accuracy of Pictor A's spectrum make it an excellent calibrator for experiments seeking to measure 21cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization.
  • This work describes a new instrument optimized for a detection of the neutral hydrogen 21cm power spectrum between redshifts of 0.5-1.5: the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) Array. BAOBAB will build on the efforts of a first generation of 21cm experiments which are targeting a detection of the signal from the Epoch of Reionization at z ~ 10. At z ~ 1, the emission from neutral hydrogen in self-shielded overdense halos also presents an accessible signal, since the dominant, synchrotron foreground emission is considerably fainter than at redshift 10. The principle science driver for these observations are Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the matter power spectrum which have the potential to act as a standard ruler and constrain the nature of dark energy. BAOBAB will fully correlate dual-polarization antenna tiles over the 600-900MHz band with a frequency resolution of 300 kHz and a system temperature of 50K. The number of antennas will grow in staged deployments, and reconfigurations of the array will allow for both traditional imaging and high power spectrum sensitivity operations. We present calculations of the power spectrum sensitivity for various array sizes, with a 35-element array measuring the cosmic neutral hydrogen fraction as a function of redshift, and a 132-element system detecting the BAO features in the power spectrum, yielding a 1.8% error on the z ~ 1 distance scale, and, in turn, significant improvements to constraints on the dark energy equation of state over an unprecedented range of redshifts from ~0.5-1.5.