• BANYAN $\Sigma$ is a new Bayesian algorithm to identify members of young stellar associations within 150 pc of the Sun. It includes 27 young associations with ages in the range ~1-800 Myr, modelled with multivariate Gaussians in 6-dimensional XYZUVW space. It is the first such multi-association classification tool to include the nearest sub-groups of the Sco-Cen OB star-forming region, the IC 2602, IC 2391, Pleiades and Platais 8 clusters, and the $\rho$ Ophiuchi, Corona Australis, and Taurus star-formation regions. A model of field stars is built from a mixture of multivariate Gaussians based on the Besan\c{c}on Galactic model. The algorithm can derive membership probabilities for objects with only sky coordinates and proper motion, but can also include parallax and radial velocity measurements, as well as spectrophotometric distance constraints from sequences in color-magnitude or spectral type-magnitude diagrams. BANYAN $\Sigma$ benefits from an analytical solution to the Bayesian marginalization integrals that makes it more accurate and significantly faster than its predecessor BANYAN II. A contamination versus hit rate analysis is presented and demonstrates that BANYAN $\Sigma$ achieves a better classification performance than other moving group classification tools, especially in terms of cross-contamination between young associations. An updated list of bona fide members in the 27 young associations, augmented by the Gaia-DR1 release, are presented. This new tool will make it possible to analyze large data sets such as the upcoming Gaia-DR2 to identify new young stars. IDL and Python versions of BANYAN $\Sigma$ are made available with this publication. (shortened)
  • TYC 8241 2652 1 is a young star that showed a strong mid-infrared (mid-IR, 8-25 mu) excess in all observations before 2008 consistent with a dusty disk. Between 2008 and 2010 the mid-IR luminosity of this system dropped dramatically by at least a factor of 30 suggesting a loss of dust mass of an order of magnitude or more. We aim to constrain possible models including removal of disk material by stellar activity processes, the presence of a binary companion, or other explanations suggested in the literature. We present new X-ray observations, optical spectroscopy, near-IR interferometry, and mid-IR photometry of this system to constrain its parameters and further explore the cause of the dust mass loss. In X-rays TYC 8241 2652 1 has all properties expected from a young star: Its luminosity is in the saturation regime and the abundance pattern shows enhancement of O/Fe. The photospheric Ha line is filled with a weak emission feature, indicating chromospheric activity consistent with the observed level of coronal emission. Interferometry does not detect a companion and sets upper limits on the companion mass of 0.2, 0.35, 0.1 and 0.05 M_sun at projected physical separations of 0.1-4 AU,4-5 AU, 5-10 AU, and 10-30 AU, respectively (assuming a distance of 120.9 pc). Our mid-IR measurements, the first of the system since 2012, are consistent with the depleted dust level seen after 2009. The new data confirms that stellar activity is unlikely to destroy the dust in the disk and shows that scenarios where either TYC 8241 2652 1 heats the disk of a binary companion or a potential companion heats the disk of TYC 8241 2652 1 are unlikely.
  • X-ray observations of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars of M-type probe coronal emission and offer a means to investigate magnetic activity at the stellar-substellar boundary. Recent observations of main sequence (MS) stars at this boundary display a decrease in fractional X-ray luminosity ($L_{X}$/$L_{bol}$) by almost two orders of magnitude for spectral types M7 and later. We investigate magnetic activity and search for a decrease in X-ray emission in the pre-MS progenitors of these MS stars. We present XMM-Newton X-ray observations and preliminary results for ~10 nearby (30-70 pc), very low mass pre-MS stars in the relatively unexplored age range of 10-30 Myr. We compare the fractional X-ray luminosities of these 10-30 Myr old stars to younger (1-3 Myr) pre-MS brown dwarfs and find no dependence on spectral type or age suggesting that X-ray activity declines at an age later than ~30 Myr in these very low-mass stars.
  • Low-mass, pre-main sequence stars possess intense high-energy radiation fields as a result of their strong stellar magnetic activity. This stellar UV and X-ray radiation may have a profound impact on the lifetimes of protoplanetary disks. We aim to constrain the X-ray-induced photoevaporation rates of protoplanetary disks orbiting low-mass stars by analyzing serendipitous XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of candidate nearby (D $<$ 100 pc), young (age $<$ 100 Myr) M stars identified in the GALEX Nearby Young-Star Survey (GALNYSS).
  • On one side, so far a great part of the evidence accepted as proof of the alleged quantum non-locality relied on inhomogeneous Bell inequalities involving an additional assumption (no-enhancement) whose role had not been sufficiently examined (in contrast to homogeneous inequalities, where the role of low detection rates is well acknowledged). A first contribution of this paper is to provide explicit examples of how a model of hidden local variables (LHV) defying no-enhancement is able to produce a violation of an inhomogeneous inequality, a possibility that so far was pointed out only in qualitative terms. On the other hand, recent tests have attempted to overcome this reliance on supplementary assumptions, but still give rise to doubt, due to: (i) violations are extremely low, which points to some systematical error (the fact that alleged random errors of the detectors seem to conspire to interfere exactly at such narrow strip around the frontier with local-realism and not a different part of the spectrum that QM would theoretically produce can hardly be considered just coincidence); (ii) the correspondence between the observations and one or another quantum state is not clear either, as recent models cannot be really validated against the available data (they have equal or more parameters than restrictions). Following (ii), it would be convenient to verify a more significant set of quantum predictions, instead of just the few counting rates involved in a particular Bell inequality. Finally, another type of "no-go" tests (an instance of which we examine here) also present subtleties which call for serious examination.
  • High order terms in the electromagnetic multipole development expose a stabilizing mechanism for the atomic orbitals in the presence of the ZPF-background. Boyer and Puthoff set forward the idea that for the Bohr orbits in the hydrogen atom, radiation losses could be compensated by absorption from a background of zero point vacuum fluctuations. This balance is, on average over the orbit, a necessary condition for stationarity of the movement, and imposes a relation on the pair $R_{0}$ (orbital radius), $\omega_{0}$ (orbital angular velocity). That relation is simply what we have for long known as angular momentum quantization. Taking into account the stochastic nature of the ZPF, we have to realize that nothing, however, has been said yet on how could this balance be attained on a quasi instantaneous basis, in other words, how could the orbit accommodate the instantaneous excess or defect of energy so as to keep constant the (at least average) values of its parameters ($R_{0}$, $\omega_{0}$). Using classical electromagnetism, we explore some high order interactions between realistic particles, exposing a mechanism (a feedback loop between variables) that makes that stability possible. Puthoff's work led necessarily to the quantization of angular momentum: "if stable orbits exist... then their angular momentum must be quantized"; now, too, we are able to do a much stronger statement: "the equations of the system, in the presence of ZPF background, lead necessarily to a discrete set of stable orbits".
  • Regardless of past proposals (already disproved in experimental work by Brida et al), the Wigner picture of Parametric Down Conversion (works by Casado et al) can be interpreted as a local-realistic formalism, without the need to depart from quantum mechanical predictions at any step, at least for the relevant subset of QED-states. This involves reinterpreting the expressions for the detection probabilities, by means of an additional mathematical manipulation; though such manipulation seemingly provides enough freedom to guarantee consistency with the expectable, experimentally testable behavior of detectors, this is, in any case, irrelevant in relation to our main result, of a purely mathematical nature. Besides, the Wigner-PDC approach opens clear room to explain the elusive nature of a loop-hole free proof of the incompatibility of nature with that local-realism, without the need to assume hypothetical technological inefficiencies yet to overcome after several decades of experimental work. In relation to this, we also address the consequences of this framework in relation to typical Bell experiments. Additionally, we also propose an extremely simple interpretation on that apparently awkward "subtraction" of the average ZPF intensity at the Wigner image of the detection process.
  • Summary of results and overall conclusions on my works in the field of Bell inequalities and QM's alleged non-locality.
  • Elementary particles are found in two different situations: (i) bound to metastable states of matter, for which angular momentum is quantized, and (ii) free, for which, due to their high energy-momentum and leaving aside inner a.m. or spin, the $h$-quantization step is completely harmless. Perhaps Quantum Mechanics can be seen just as the simplest mathematical formalism where angular momentum (the magnitude of each of its three orthogonal projections) is by construction quantized: all possible values are taken from a discrete set. Indeed: (i) This idea finds support in very reasonable, completely classical physical arguments, if we place ourselves in the framework of Stochastic Electrodynamics (SED): there, all sustained periodic movement of a charge must satisfy a power balance that restricts the value of the average angular momentum, on each of its projections. (ii) It gives a natural explanation of the concept of "photon", as a constraint on the observable spectrum of energy-momentum exchanges between metastable physical states, in particular also for its discreteness. QM would be, in this picture, a semi-static theory, transparent to all the (micro)-dynamics taking place between apparently "discrete" events (transitions in the state of the system). For instance, (the magnitude of the projections of) quantum angular momentum would only reflect average values over a (classical) cyclic trajectory, a fact that we regard as almost obvious given the particularity of the corresponding addition rules in QM.
  • The majority of debris discs discovered so far have only been detected through infrared excess emission above stellar photospheres. While disc properties can be inferred from unresolved photometry alone under various assumptions for the physical properties of dust grains, there is a degeneracy between disc radius and dust temperature that depends on the grain size distribution and optical properties. By resolving the disc we can measure the actual location of the dust. The launch of Herschel, with an angular resolution superior to previous far-infrared telescopes, allows us to spatially resolve more discs and locate the dust directly. Here we present the nine resolved discs around A stars between 20 and 40 pc observed by the DEBRIS survey. We use these data to investigate the disc radii by fitting narrow ring models to images at 70, 100 and 160 {\mu}m and by fitting blackbodies to full spectral energy distributions. We do this with the aim of finding an improved way of estimating disc radii for unresolved systems. The ratio between the resolved and blackbody radii varies between 1 and 2.5. This ratio is inversely correlated with luminosity and any remaining discrepancies are most likely explained by differences to the minimum size of grain in the size distribution or differences in composition. We find that three of the systems are well fit by a narrow ring, two systems are borderline cases and the other four likely require wider or multiple rings to fully explain the observations, reflecting the diversity of planetary systems.
  • Within the Wigner-PDC picture of photon entanglement, detection "errors" are not independent (though they may look, on average), nor can they be controlled by means of a technological improvement on the detectors. Those two elements make possible the interpretation of experimental evidence without the need to exclude local realism: for that reason, we propose the abandonment of the usual (photon, particle-based) description of (PDC-generated) light states, in favour of an also quantum, but field-theoretical description (QED), a description that finds a one-to-one equivalent in the Wigner-PDC approach we have advocated in recent posts.
  • Perhaps it is not completely superfluous to remind that Clauser-Horne factorability, introduced in [1], is only necessary when \lambda, the hidden variable (HV), is sufficiently deterministic: for {M_i} a set of possible measurements (isolated or not by space-like intervals) on a given system, the most general sufficient condition for factorability on \lambda\ is obtained by finding a set of expressions M_i=M_i(\lambda,\xi_i), with {\xi_i} a set of HV's, all independent from one another and from \lambda. Otherwise, factorability can be recovered on \gamma = \lambda\ \oplus\ \mu, with \mu\ another additional HV, so that a description M_i=M_i(\gamma,\xi_i) is again found: conceptually, this is always possible; experimentally, it may not: \mu\ may be unaccessible or even its existence unknown (and so, too, from the point of view of a phenomenological theory). Results here may help clarify our recent post in [6].
  • Assuming perfect detection efficiency, we present an (indeterministic) model for an EPR-Bohm experiment which reproduces the singlet correlations, without contradicting Bell's original locality condition. In this model we allow the probability distribution $\rho_{\lambda}$ of the state $\lambda$ at the source to depend parametrically on the orientation $\xi$ of one of the measuring devices: $\rho_{\lambda}(\lambda,\xi)$. In a Bell experiment, no-signaling between the source and each one of the devices would seem clearly sufficient to rule such an influence; however, not even schemes where the choice of observables takes place during the on-flight time of the particles can prevent, in some situations, a model of this type from violating the local bounds. In particular, a random shift $\rho_{\lambda}(\lambda,\xi_1) \rightarrow \rho_{\lambda}(\lambda,\xi_2) \rightarrow...\rightarrow \rho_{\lambda}(\lambda,\xi_n)$ allows the model to perform a "subensemble selection" for each of the terms involved in the inequality (analogous to what goes on with the efficiency loophole), whenever some correlation of those $\rho_{\lambda}$-shifts with the sequence of measurement choices is allowed. That correlation does not necessarily imply signaling during the photon on-flight time.
  • BP Psc is a remarkable emission-line field star that is orbited by a dusty disk and drives a parsec-scale system of jets. We report the detection by the Chandra X-ray Observatory of a weak X-ray point source coincident with the centroids of optical/IR and submillimeter continuum emission at BP Psc. As the star's photosphere is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared, the Chandra X-ray source likely represents the first detection of BP Psc itself. The X-rays most likely originate with magnetic activity at BP Psc and hence can be attributed either to a stellar corona or to star-disk interactions. The log of the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity (log(L_X/L_{bol}) lies in the range -5.8 to -4.2. This is smaller than log(L_X/L_{bol}) ratios typical of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars, but is well within the log(L_X/L_{bol}) range observed for rapidly-rotating (FK Com-type) G giant stars. Hence, the Chandra results favor an exotic model wherein the disk/jet system of BP Psc is the result of its very recently engulfing a companion star or giant planet, as the primary star ascended the giant branch.
  • We present results from the earliest observations of DEBRIS, a Herschel Key Programme to conduct a volume- and flux-limited survey for debris discs in A-type through M-type stars. PACS images (from chop/nod or scan-mode observations) at 100 and 160 micron are presented toward two A-type stars and one F-type star: beta Leo, beta UMa and eta Corvi. All three stars are known disc hosts. Herschel spatially resolves the dust emission around all three stars (marginally, in the case of beta UMa), providing new information about discs as close as 11 pc with sizes comparable to that of the Solar System. We have combined these data with existing flux density measurements of the discs to refine the SEDs and derive estimates of the fractional luminosities, temperatures and radii of the discs.
  • This paper proposes to address new requirements of confidentiality, integrity and availability properties fitting to peer-to-peer domains of resources. The enforcement of security properties in an open peer-topeer network remains an open problem as the literature have mainly proposed contribution on availability of resources and anonymity of users. That paper proposes a novel architecture that eases the administration of a peer-to-peer network. It considers a network of safe peer-to-peer clients in the sense that it is a commune client software that is shared by all the participants to cope with the sharing of various resources associated with different security requirements. However, our proposal deals with possible malicious peers that attempt to compromise the requested security properties. Despite the safety of an open peer-to-peer network cannot be formally guaranteed, since a end user has privileges on the target host, our solution provides several advanced security enforcement. First, it enables to formally define the requested security properties of the various shared resources. Second, it evaluates the trust and the reputation of the requesting peer by sending challenges that test the fairness of its peer-to-peer security policy. Moreover, it proposes an advanced Mandatory Access Control that enforces the required peer-to-peer security properties through an automatic projection of the requested properties onto SELinux policies. Thus, the SELinux system of the requesting peer is automatically configured with respect to the required peer-to-peer security properties.
  • The chained Bell inequalities of Braunstein and Caves involving N settings per observer have some interesting applications. Here we obtain the minimum detection efficiency required for a loophole-free violation of the Braunstein-Caves inequalities for any N > 2. We discuss both the case in which both particles are detected with the same efficiency and the case in which the particles are detected with different efficiencies.
  • We prove that the threshold detection efficiency for a loophole-free Bell experiment using an $n$-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state and the correlations appearing in the $n$-partite Mermin inequality is $n/(2n-2)$. If the detection efficiency is equal to or lower than this value, there are local hidden variable models that can simulate all the quantum predictions. If the detection efficiency is above this value, there is no local hidden variable model that can simulate all the quantum predictions.
  • Any n-qubit state with n independent perfect correlations is equivalent to a graph state. We present the optimal Bell inequalities for perfect correlations and maximal violation for all classes of graph states with n < 7 qubits. Twelve of them were previously unknown and four give the same violation as the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, although the corresponding states are more resistant to decoherence.