• We review the current status of the facility instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT has 2x 8.4m primary mirrors on a single mount with an effective collecting area of 11.8m or 23m when interferometrically combined. The facility instruments are: 1) the Large Binocular Cameras (LBCs), each with a 23'x25' field of view (FOV). The blue and red optimized optical LBCs are mounted at the prime focus of the left and right primary mirrors, respectively. The filter suite of the two LBCs covers 0.3-1.1{\mu}m, including the new TiO (0.78{\mu}m) and CN (0.82{\mu}m) filters; 2) the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), two identical optical spectrographs each mounted at a straight through f/15 Gregorian mount. MODS-1 & -2 can do imaging with Sloan filters and medium resolution (R~2000) spectroscopy, each with 24 interchangeable masks (multi-object or longslit) over a 6'x6' FOV. Each MODS is capable of blue (0.32-0.6{\mu}m) and red (0.5-1.05{\mu}m) wavelength only coverage or, using a dichroic, 0.32-1.05{\mu}m coverage; and 3) the two LBT Utility Camera in the Infrared instruments (LUCIs), each mounted at a bent-front Gregorian f/15 port. LUCI-1 & 2 are designed for seeing-limited (4'x4'FOV) and AO (0.5'x0.5' FOV) imaging & spectroscopy over 0.95-2.5{\mu}m with spectroscopic resolutions of R~400-11000, including 32 interchangeable cryogenically cooled masks. All facility instruments are on the LBT and, for the first time, have been on-sky for science. We also report on the first science use of "mixed-mode" (differently paired instruments). While both primary mirrors reside on a single fixed mount, they are capable of operating independently within a defined "co-pointing" limit. This provides users with the additional capability to independently dither each mirror or center observations on two different sets of spatial coordinates within this limit. (ABRIDGED)
  • So far, roughly 40 quasars with redshifts greater than z=6 have been discovered. Each quasar contains a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses ($10^9 M_\odot$). The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than 1 billion years old presents substantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the coevolution of black holes and galaxies. Here we report the discovery of an ultra-luminous quasar, SDSS J010013.02+280225.8, at redshift z=6.30. It has an optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z>6 quasars. On the basis of the deep absorption trough on the blue side of the Ly $\alpha$ emission line in the spectrum, we estimate the proper size of the ionized proximity zone associated with the quasar to be 26 million light years, larger than found with other z>6.1 quasars with lower luminosities. We estimate (on the basis of a near-infrared spectrum) that the black hole has a mass of $\sim 1.2 \times 10^{10} M_\odot$, which is consistent with the $1.3 \times 10^{10} M_\odot$ derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion rate.
  • We investigate the luminosity dependent clustering of rest-frame UV selected galaxies at z~4, 3, 2.2, and 1.7 in the Keck Deep Fields (KDFs), which are complete to R = 27 and cover 169 arcmin^2. We find that at z~4 and 3, UV-bright galaxies cluster more strongly than UV-faint ones, but at z~2.2 and 1.7, the UV-bright galaxies are no longer the most strongly clustered. We derive mass estimates for objects in our sample by comparing our measurements to the predicted clustering of dark matter haloes in the Millennium Simulation. From these estimates, we infer relationships between halo mass and star formation rate (SFR), and find that the most massive dark matter haloes in our sample host galaxies with high SFRs (M_1700 < -20, or > 50 M_sun/yr) at z~3 and 4, moderate SFRs (-20<M_1700<-19, or ~20 M_sun/yr) at z~2.2, and lower SFRs (-19<M_1700<-18, or ~2 M_sun/yr) at z~1.7. We believe our measurements may provide a new line of evidence for galaxy downsizing by extending that concept from stellar to halo mass. We also find that the objects with blue UV colors in our sample are much more strongly clustered than those with red UV colors, and we propose that this may be due to the presence of the 2175A dust absorption bump in more massive halos, which contain the older stellar populations and dust needed to produce the feature. The relatively small area covered by the survey means that the absolute values of the correlation lengths and halo masses we derive are heavily dependent on the "integral constraint" correction, but the uniformly deep coverage across a large redshift interval allows us to detect several important trends that are independent of this correction.
  • We consider the isoperimetric problem in planar sectors with density $r^{p}$, and with density $a>1$ inside the unit disk and $1$ outside. We characterize solutions as a function of sector angle. We also solve the isoperimetric problem in $\mathbb{R}^{n}$ with density $r^{p},\; p<0$.
  • We present rest-frame optical images and spectra of the gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy J0900+2234 (z=2.03). The observations were performed with the newly commissioned LUCIFER1 near-infrared instrument mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). We fit lens models to the rest-frame optical images and find the galaxy has an intrinsic effective radius of 7.4 kpc with a lens magnification factor of about 5 for the A and B components. We also discovered a new arc belonging to another lensed high-z source galaxy, which makes this lens system a potential double Einstein ring system. Using the high S/N rest-frame optical spectra covering H+K band, we detected Hbeta, OIII, Halpha, NII and SII emission lines. Detailed physical properties of this high-z galaxy were derived. The extinction towards the ionized HII regions (E_g(B-V)) is computed from the flux ratio of Halpha and Hbeta and appears to be much higher than that towards stellar continuum (E_s(B-V)), derived from the optical and NIR broad band photometry fitting. The metallicity was estimated using N2 and O3N2 indices. It is in the range of 1/5-1/3 solar abundance, which is much lower than the typical z~2 star-forming galaxies. From the flux ratio of SII 6717 and 6732, we found that the electron number density of the HII regions in the high-z galaxy were >1000 cm^-3, consistent with other z~2 galaxies but much higher than that in local HII regions. The star-formation rate was estimated via the Halpha luminosity, after correction for the lens magnification, to be about 365\pm69 Msun/yr. Combining the FWHM of Halpha emission lines and the half-light radius, we found the dynamical mass of the lensed galaxy is 5.8\pm0.9x10^10 Msun. The gas mass is 5.1\pm1.1x10^10~Msun from the H\alpha flux surface density by using global Kennicutt-Schmidt Law, indicating a very high gas fraction of 0.79\pm0.19 in J0900+2234.
  • We present the first deep color-magnitude diagram of the Canes Venatici I (CVnI) dwarf galaxy from observations with the wide field Large Binocular Camera on the Large Binocular Telescope. Reaching down to the main-sequence turnoff of the oldest stars, it reveals a dichotomy in the stellar populations of CVnI: it harbors an old (> 10 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -2.0) and spatially extended population along with a much younger (~ 1.4-2.0 Gyr), 0.5 dex more metal-rich, and spatially more concentrated population. These young stars are also offset by 64_{-20}^{+40} pc to the East of the galaxy center. The data suggest that this young population, which represent ~ 3-5 % of the stellar mass of the galaxy within its half-light radius, should be identified with the kinematically cold stellar component found by Ibata et al. (2006). CVnI therefore follows the behavior of the other remote MW dwarf spheroidals which all contain intermediate age and/or young populations: a complex star formation history is possible in extremely low-mass galaxies.
  • We study the properties of very faint, sub-L* Lyman break galaxies at z~2-5 - thus far a largely neglected but numerically and energetically very important population. We find that the LBG luminosity function undergoes luminosity-dependent evolution: the number of luminous galaxies remains constant while the number of faint ones grows with time. The total UV luminosity density increases with cosmic time from at least z~5 until reaching a peak or a plateau around z~2 - behaviour that is governed by the sub-L* galaxies in the LF's "faint tail". Using broadband SED fitting we find a nearly-linear relationship between SFR and galaxy stellar mass at z~2. A typical L* LBG at z~2 shows a stellar mass of ~10^10M_sun, remarkably similar to the bimodality mass at low redshift. This similarity suggests that the mechanisms responsible for the galaxy bimodality at low-z may have also been at play at z~2.
  • We use the Keck Deep Fields UGRI catalog of z~4, 3, and 2 UV-selected galaxies to study the evolution of the rest-frame 1700A luminosity density at high redshift. The ability to reliably constrain the contribution of faint galaxies is critical and our data do so as they reach to M*+2 even at z~4 and deeper still at lower redshifts. We find that the luminosity density at high redshift is dominated by the hitherto poorly studied galaxies fainter than L*, and, indeed, the the bulk of the UV light in the high-z Universe comes from galaxies in the luminosity range L=0.1-1L*. It is these faint galaxies that govern the behavior of the total UV luminosity density. Overall, there is a gradual rise in luminosity density starting at z~4 or earlier, followed by a shallow peak or a plateau within z~3--1, and then followed by the well-know plunge at lower redshifts. Within this total picture, luminosity density in sub-L* galaxies evolves more rapidly at high redshift, z>~2, than that in more luminous objects. However, this is reversed at lower redshifts, z<~1, a reversal that is reminiscent of galaxy downsizing. Within the context of the models commonly used in the observational literature, there seemingly aren't enough faint or bright LBGs to maintain ionization of intergalactic gas even as late as z~4. This is particularly true at earlier epochs and even more so if the faint-end evolutionary trends we observe at z~3 and 4 continue to higher redshifts. Apparently the Universe must be easier to reionize than some recent studies have assumed. Nevertheless, sub-L* galaxies do dominate the total UV luminosity density at z>~2 and this dominance further highlights the need for follow-up studies that will teach us more about these very numerous but thus far largely unexplored systems.
  • We use very deep (R_lim=27) UGRI imaging to study the evolution of the faint end of the UV-selected galaxy luminosity function from z~4 to z~2. We find that the luminosity function evolves with time and that this evolution is differential with luminosity: the number of sub-L* galaxies increases from z~4 to z~3 by at least a factor of 2.3, while the bright end of the LF remains unchanged. Potential systematic biases restrict our ability to draw strong conclusions at lower redshifts, z~2, but we can say that the number density of sub-L* galaxies at z~2.2 is at least as high as it is at z~3. Turning to the UV luminosity density of the Universe, we find that the luminosity density starts dropping with increasing redshift already beginning at z=3 (earlier than recently thought - Steidel et al. 1999) and that this drop is dominated by the same sub-L* galaxies that dominate the evolution of the LF. This differential evolution of the luminosity function suggests that differentially comparing key diagnostics of dust, stellar populations, etc. as a function of z and L should let us isolate the key mechanisms that drive galaxy evolution at high redshift.
  • The problem of finding supersymmetric brane configurations in the near-horizon attractor geometry of a Calabi-Yau black hole with magnetic-electric charges (p^I,q_I) is considered. Half-BPS configurations, which are static for some choice of global AdS2 coordinate, are found for wrapped brane configurations with essentially any four-dimensional charges (u^I,v_I). Half-BPS multibrane configurations can also be found for any collection of wrapped branes provided they all have the same sign for the symplectic inner product p^Iv_I-u^Iq_I of their charges with the black hole charges. This contrasts with the Minkowski problem for which a mutually preserved supersymmetry requires alignment of all the charge vectors. The radial position of the branes in global AdS2 is determined by the phase of their central charge.
  • The Bousso bound requires that one quarter the area of a closed codimension two spacelike surface exceeds the entropy flux across a certain lightsheet terminating on the surface. The bound can be violated by quantum effects such as Hawking radiation. It is proposed that at the quantum level the bound be modified by adding to the area the quantum entanglement entropy across the surface. The validity of this quantum Bousso bound is proven in a two-dimensional large N dilaton gravity theory.