• We present clustering measurements and halo masses of star forming galaxies at 0.2 < z < 1.0. After excluding AGN, we construct a sample of 22553 24 {\mu}m sources selected from 8.42 deg^2 of the Spitzer MIPS AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey of Bo\"otes. Mid-infrared imaging allows us to observe galaxies with the highest star formation rates (SFRs), less biased by dust obscuration afflicting the optical bands. We find that the galaxies with the highest SFRs have optical colors which are redder than typical blue cloud galaxies, with many residing within the green valley. At z > 0.4 our sample is dominated by luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L_TIR > 10^11 Lsun) and is comprised entirely of LIRGs and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, L_TIR > 10^12 Lsun) at z > 0.6. We observe weak clustering of r_0 = 3-6 Mpc/h for almost all of our star forming samples. We find that the clustering and halo mass depend on L_TIR at all redshifts, where galaxies with higher L_TIR (hence higher SFRs) have stronger clustering. Galaxies with the highest SFRs at each redshift typically reside within dark matter halos of M_halo ~ 10^12.9 Msun/h. This is consistent with a transitional halo mass, above which star formation is largely truncated, although we cannot exclude that ULIRGs reside within higher mass halos. By modeling the clustering evolution of halos, we connect our star forming galaxy samples to their local descendants. Most star forming galaxies at z < 1.0 are the progenitors of L < 2.5L* blue galaxies in the local universe, but star forming galaxies with the highest SFRs (L_TIR >10^11.7 Lsun) at 0.6<z<1.0 are the progenitors of early-type galaxies in denser group environments.
  • We compare the star formation (SF) activity in cluster galaxies to the field from z=0.3-1.5 using $Herschel$ SPIRE 250$\mu$m imaging. We utilize 274 clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS) selected as rest-frame near-infrared overdensities over the 9 square degree Bootes field . This analysis allows us to quantify the evolution of SF in clusters over a long redshift baseline without bias against active cluster systems. Using a stacking analysis, we determine the average star formation rates (SFRs) and specific-SFRs (SSFR=SFR/M$_{\star}$) of stellar mass-limited (M>1.3x10$^{10}$ M$_{\odot}$), statistical samples of cluster and field galaxies, probing both the star forming and quiescent populations. We find a clear indication that the average SF in cluster galaxies is evolving more rapidly than in the field, with field SF levels at z>1.2 in the cluster cores (r<0.5 Mpc), in good agreement with previous ISCS studies. By quantifying the SF in cluster and field galaxies as an exponential function of cosmic time, we determine that cluster galaxies are evolving ~2 times faster than the field. Additionally, we see enhanced SF above the field level at z~1.4 in the cluster outskirts (r>0.5 Mpc). These general trends in the cluster cores and outskirts are driven by the lower mass galaxies in our sample. Blue cluster galaxies have systematically lower SSFRs than blue field galaxies, but otherwise show no strong differential evolution with respect to the field over our redshift range. This suggests that the cluster environment is both suppressing the star formation in blue galaxies on long time-scales and rapidly transitioning some fraction of blue galaxies to the quiescent galaxy population on short time-scales. We argue that our results are consistent with both strangulation and ram pressure stripping acting in these clusters, with merger activity occurring in the cluster outskirts.
  • Galaxy clusters provide powerful laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, particularly the origin of correlations of morphology and star formation rate (SFR) with density. We construct visible to MIR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of cluster galaxies and use them to measure stellar masses and SFRs in eight low redshift clusters, which we examine as a function of environment. A partial correlation analysis indicates that SFR depends strongly on R/R200 (>99.9% confidence) and is independent of projected local density at fixed radius. SFR also shows no residual dependence on stellar mass. We therefore conclude that interactions with the intra-cluster medium drive the evolution of SFRs in cluster galaxies. A merged sample of galaxies from the five most complete clusters shows <SFR>\propto(R/R200)^(1.3+/-0.7) for galaxies with R/R200<0.4. A decline in the fraction of SFGs toward the cluster center contributes most of this effect, but it is accompanied by a reduction in SFRs among star-forming galaxies (SFGs) near the cluster center. The increase in the fraction of SFGs toward larger R/R200 and the isolation of SFGs with reduced SFRs near the cluster center are consistent with ram pressure stripping as the mechanism to truncate star formation in galaxy clusters. We conclude that stripping drives the properties of SFGs over the range of radii we examine. We also find that galaxies near the cluster center are more massive than galaxies farther out in the cluster at ~3.5\sigma, which suggests that cluster galaxies experience dynamical relaxation during the course of their evolution.
  • Clusters of galaxies have long been used as laboratories for the study of galaxy evolution, but despite intense, recent interest in feedback between AGNs and their hosts, the impact of environment on these relationships remains poorly constrained. We present results from a study of AGNs and their host galaxies found in low-redshift galaxy clusters. We fit model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to the combined visible and mid-infrared (MIR) photometry of cluster members and use these model SEDs to determine stellar masses and star-formation rates (SFRs). We identify two populations of AGNs, the first based on their X-ray luminosities (X-ray AGNs) and the second based on the presence of a significant AGN component in their model SEDs (IR AGNs). We find that the two AGN populations are nearly disjoint; only 8 out of 44 AGNs are identified with both techniques. We further find that IR AGNs are hosted by galaxies with similar masses and SFRs but higher specific SFRs (sSFRs) than X-ray AGN hosts. The relationship between AGN accretion and host star-formation in cluster AGN hosts shows no significant difference compared to the relationship between field AGNs and their hosts. The projected radial distributions of both AGN populations are consistent with the distribution of other cluster members. We argue that the apparent dichotomy between X-ray and IR AGNs can be understood as a combination of differing extinction due to cold gas in the host galaxies of the two classes of AGNs and the presence of weak star-formation in X-ray AGN hosts.
  • We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe - 0.027 < z < 0.144 - cover a range hitherto sparsely sampled in the literature; in particular, our SNe II-P sample contains nearly as many SNe in the Hubble flow (z > 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. (2009). We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 must be improved, and spectral templates able to encompass the intrinsic variations of Type II-P SNe will be needed.
  • We study the UV properties of Type I AGN from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey that have been selected to show unusually soft X-ray continua. We examine a sample of 54 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detections in both Near-UV and Far-UV bands of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite. Our sample is systematically fainter in the UV than galaxies studied in similar work by previous authors. We look for correlations between their UV and X-ray properties as well as correlations of these properties with either black hole mass or Eddington ratio. The shape of the Big Blue Bump(BBB) in the GALEX regime does not appear to correlate with its strength relative to the power law continuum, which conflicts with results reported by previous authors. The strength of the BBB is correlated with the shape of the X-ray continuum, in agreement with previous work, but the slope of the correlation is different than previously reported. The properties of the accretion disks of Type I AGN in the GALEX regime are relatively independent of black hole mass and Eddington ratio. We compare our measurements to the predictions of alternative theories for the origin of the soft excess, but we are unable to distinguish between Comptonization of BBB photons by a hot plasma and absorption in relativistic winds as the most likely origins for the soft X-ray excess.
  • We examine the UV emission from luminous early-type galaxies as a function of redshift. We perform a stacking analysis using Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) images of galaxies in the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS) Bo\"otes field and examine the evolution in the UV colors of the average galaxy. Our sample, selected to have minimal ongoing star formation based on the optical to mid-IR SEDs of the galaxies, includes 1843 galaxies spanning the redshift range $0.05\leq z\leq0.65$. We find evidence that the strength of the UV excess decreases, on average, with redshift, and our measurements also show moderate disagreement with previous models of the UV excess. Our results show little evolution in the shape of the UV continuum with redshift, consistent either with the binary model for the formation of Extreme Horizontal Branch (EHB) stars or with no evolution in EHB morphology with look-back time. However, the binary formation model predicts that the strength of the UV excess should also be relatively constant, in contradiction with our measured results. Finally, we see no significant influence of a galaxy's environment on the strength of its UV excess.
  • We present a catalog of 36,120 QSO candidates from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Release Two (GR2) UV catalog and the USNO-A2.0 optical catalog. The selection criteria are established using known quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The SDSS sample is then used to assign individual probabilities to our GALEX-USNO candidates. The mean probability is ~50%, and would rise to ~65% if better morphological information than that from USNO were available to eliminate galaxies. The sample is ~40% complete for i<=19.1. Candidates are cross-identified in 2MASS, FIRST, SDSS, and XMM-Newton Slewing Survey (XMMSL1), whenever such counterparts exist. The present catalog covers the 8000 square degrees of GR2 lying above 25 degrees Galactic latitude, but can be extended to all 24,000 square degress that satisfy this criterion as new GALEX data become available.