• In a recent breakthrough, Paz and Schwartzman (SODA'17) presented a single-pass ($2+\epsilon$)-approximation algorithm for the maximum weight matching problem in the semi-streaming model. Their algorithm uses $O(n\log^2 n)$ bits of space, for any constant $\epsilon>0$. We present two simplified and more intuitive analyses, for essentially the same algorithm, which also improve the space complexity to the optimal bound of $O(n\log n)$ bits --- this is optimal as the output matching requires $\Omega(n\log n)$ bits. Our analyses rely on a simple use of the primal-dual method and a simple accounting method.
  • Distributed graph algorithms that separately optimize for either the number of rounds used or the total number of messages sent have been studied extensively. However, algorithms simultaneously efficient with respect to both measures have been elusive. For example, only very recently was it shown that for Minimum Spanning Tree (MST), an optimal message and round complexity is achievable (up to polylog terms) by a single algorithm in the CONGEST model of communication. In this paper we provide algorithms that are simultaneously round- and message-optimal for a number of well-studied distributed optimization problems. Our main result is such a distributed algorithm for the fundamental primitive of computing simple functions over each part of a graph partition. From this algorithm we derive round- and message-optimal algorithms for multiple problems, including MST, Approximate Min-Cut and Approximate Single Source Shortest Paths, among others. On general graphs all of our algorithms achieve worst-case optimal $\tilde{O}(D+\sqrt n)$ round complexity and $\tilde{O}(m)$ message complexity. Furthermore, our algorithms require an optimal $\tilde{O}(D)$ rounds and $\tilde{O}(n)$ messages on planar, genus-bounded, treewidth-bounded and pathwidth-bounded graphs.
  • We present a simple randomized reduction from fully-dynamic integral matching algorithms to fully-dynamic "approximately-maximal" fractional matching algorithms. Applying this reduction to the recent fractional matching algorithm of Bhattacharya, Henzinger, and Nanongkai (SODA 2017), we obtain a novel result for the integral problem. Specifically, our main result is a randomized fully-dynamic $(2+\epsilon)$-approximate integral matching algorithm with small polylog worst-case update time. For the $(2+\epsilon)$-approximation regime only a \emph{fractional} fully-dynamic $(2+\epsilon)$-matching algorithm with worst-case polylog update time was previously known, due to Bhattacharya et al.~(SODA 2017). Our algorithm is the first algorithm that maintains approximate matchings with worst-case update time better than polynomial, for any constant approximation ratio. As a consequence, we also obtain the first constant-approximate worst-case polylogarithmic update time maximum weight matching algorithm.
  • We study the classic Bin Packing problem in a fully-dynamic setting, where new items can arrive and old items may depart. We want algorithms with low asymptotic competitive ratio \emph{while repacking items sparingly} between updates. Formally, each item $i$ has a \emph{movement cost} $c_i\geq 0$, and we want to use $\alpha \cdot OPT$ bins and incur a movement cost $\gamma\cdot c_i$, either in the worst case, or in an amortized sense, for $\alpha, \gamma$ as small as possible. We call $\gamma$ the \emph{recourse} of the algorithm. This is motivated by cloud storage applications, where fully-dynamic Bin Packing models the problem of data backup to minimize the number of disks used, as well as communication incurred in moving file backups between disks. Since the set of files changes over time, we could recompute a solution periodically from scratch, but this would give a high number of disk rewrites, incurring a high energy cost and possible wear and tear of the disks. In this work, we present optimal tradeoffs between number of bins used and number of items repacked, as well as natural extensions of the latter measure.
  • Motivated by Internet targeted advertising, we address several ad allocation problems. Prior work has established these problems admit no randomized online algorithm better than $(1-\frac{1}{e})$-competitive (\cite{karp1990optimal,mehta2007adwords}), yet simple heuristics have been observed to perform much better in practice. We explain this phenomenon by studying a generalization of the bounded-degree inputs considered by Buchbinder et al.~\cite{buchbinder2007online}, graphs which we call $(k,d)-bounded$. In such graphs the maximal degree on the online side is at most $d$ and the minimal degree on the offline side is at least $k$. We prove that for such graphs, these problems' natural greedy algorithms attain competitive ratio $1-\frac{d-1}{k+d-1}$, tending to \emph{one} as $d/k$ tends to zero. We prove this bound is tight for these algorithms. Next, we develop deterministic primal-dual algorithms for the above problems achieving competitive ratio $1-(1-\frac{1}{d})^k>1-\frac{1}{e^{k/d}}$, or \emph{exponentially} better loss as a function of $k/d$, and strictly better than $1-\frac{1}{e}$ whenever $k\geq d$. We complement our lower bounds with matching upper bounds for the vertex-weighted problem. Finally, we use our deterministic algorithms to prove by dual-fitting that simple randomized algorithms achieve the same bounds in expectation. Our algorithms and analysis differ from previous ad allocation algorithms, which largely scale bids based on the spent fraction of their bidder's budget, whereas we scale bids according to the number of times the bidder could have spent as much as her current bid. Our algorithms differ from previous online primal-dual algorithms, as they do not maintain dual feasibility, but only primal-to-dual ratio, and only attain dual feasibility upon termination. We believe our techniques could find applications to other well-behaved online packing problems.