• We present $Spitzer$/IRAC Ch1 and Ch2 monitoring of six brown dwarfs during 8 different epochs over the course of 20 months. For four brown dwarfs, we also obtained simulataneous $HST$/WFC3 G141 Grism spectra during two epochs and derived light curves in five narrow-band filters. Probing different pressure levels in the atmospheres, the multi-wavelength light curves of our six targets all exhibit variations, and the shape of the light curves evolves over the timescale of a rotation period, ranging from 1.4 h to 13 h. We compare the shapes of the light curves and estimate the phase shifts between the light curves observed at different wavelengths by comparing the phase of the primary Fourier components. We use state-of-the-art atmosphere models to determine the flux contribution of different pressure layers to the observed flux in each filter. We find that the light curves that probe higher pressures are similar and in phase, but are offset and often different from the light curves that probe lower pressures. The phase differences between the two groups of light curves suggest that the modulations seen at lower and higher pressures may be introduced by different cloud layers.
  • We present results from the "Weather on Other Worlds" Spitzer Exploration Science program to investigate photometric variability in L and T dwarfs, usually attributed to patchy clouds. We surveyed 44 L3-T8 dwarfs, spanning a range of $J-K_s$ colors and surface gravities. We find that 14/23 (61%; 95% confidence interval: 41%-78%) of our single L3-L9.5 dwarfs are variable with peak-to-peak amplitudes between 0.2% and 1.5%, and 5/16 (31%; 95% confidence interval: 14%-56%) of our single T0-T8 dwarfs are variable with amplitudes between 0.8% and 4.6%. After correcting for sensitivity, we find that 80% (95% confidence interval: 53%-100%) of L dwarfs vary by >0.2%, and 36% (95% confidence interval: 19%-52%) of T dwarfs vary by >0.4%. Given viewing geometry considerations, we conclude that photospheric heterogeneities causing >0.2% 3-5-micron flux variations are present on virtually all L dwarfs, and probably on most T dwarfs. A third of L dwarf variables show irregular light curves, indicating that L dwarfs may have multiple spots that evolve over a single rotation. Also, approximately a third of the periodicities are on time scales >10 h, suggesting that slowly-rotating brown dwarfs may be common. We observe an increase in the maximum amplitudes over the entire spectral type range, revealing a potential for greater temperature contrasts in T dwarfs than in L dwarfs. We find a tentative association (92% confidence) between low surface gravity and high-amplitude variability among L3-L5.5 dwarfs. Although we can not confirm whether lower gravity is also correlated with a higher incidence of variables, the result is promising for the characterization of directly imaged young extrasolar planets through variability.
  • We present time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy of two L5 dwarfs, 2MASS J18212815+1414010 and 2MASS J15074759-1627386, observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We study the wavelength dependence of rotation-modulated flux variations between 1.1 $\mu$m and 1.7 $\mu$m. We find that the water absorption bands of the two L5 dwarfs at 1.15 $\mu$m and 1.4 $\mu$m vary at similar amplitudes as the adjacent continuum. This differs from the results of previous HST observations of L/T transition dwarfs, in which the water absorption at 1.4 $\mu$m displays variations of about half of the amplitude at other wavelengths. We find that the relative amplitude of flux variability out of the water band with respect to that in the water band shows a increasing trend from the L5 dwarfs toward the early T dwarfs. We utilize the models of Saumon & Marley (2008) and find that the observed variability of the L5 dwarfs can be explained by the presence of spatially varying high-altitude haze layers above the condensate clouds. Therefore, our observations show that the heterogeneity of haze layers - the driver of the variability - must be located at very low pressures, where even the water opacity is negligible. In the near future, the rotational spectral mapping technique could be utilized for other atomic and molecular species to probe different pressure levels in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and exoplanets and uncover both horizontal and vertical cloud structures.
  • Condensate clouds strongly impact the spectra of brown dwarfs and exoplanets. Recent discoveries of variable L/T transition dwarfs argued for patchy clouds in at least some ultracool atmospheres. This study aims to measure the frequency and level of spectral variability in brown dwarfs and to search for correlations with spectral type. We used HST/WFC3 to obtain spectroscopic time series for 22 brown dwarfs of spectral types ranging from L5 to T6 at 1.1-1.7 $\mu$m for $\approx$40 min per object. Using Bayesian analysis, we find 6 brown dwarfs with confident $(p>95\%)$ variability in the relative flux in at least one wavelength region at sub-percent precision, and 5 brown dwarfs with tentative $(p>68\%)$ variability. We derive a minimum variability fraction $f_{min}=27^{+11}_{-7}\%$ over all covered spectral types. The fraction of variables is equal within errors for mid L, late L and mid T spectral types; for early T dwarfs we do not find any confident variable but the sample is too small to derive meaningful limits. For some objects, the variability occurs primarily in the flux peak in the J or H band, others are variable throughout the spectrum or only in specific absorption regions. Four sources may have broad-band peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 1%. Our measurements are not sensitive to very long periods, inclinations near pole-on and rotationally symmetric heterogeneity. The detection statistics are consistent with most brown dwarf photospheres being patchy. While multiple-percent near-infrared variability may be rare and confined to the L/T transition, low-level heterogeneities are a frequent characteristic of brown dwarf atmospheres.
  • Photometric monitoring from warm Spitzer reveals that the L3 dwarf DENIS-P J1058.7-1548 varies sinusoidally in brightness with a period of 4.25 +0.26/-0.16 hours and an amplitude of 0.388 +/- 0.043% (peak-to-valley) in the 3.6 micron band, confirming the reality of a 4.31 +/- 0.31 hour periodicity detected in J-band photometry from the SOAR telescope. The J-band variations are a factor of 2.17 +/- 0.35 larger in amplitude than those at 3.6 microns, while 4.5 micron Spitzer observations yield a 4.5 micron/3.6 micron amplitude ratio of only 0.23 +/- 0.15, consistent with zero 4.5 micron variability. This wide range in amplitudes indicates rotationally modulated variability due to magnetic phenomena and/or inhomogeneous cloud cover. Weak H-alpha emission indicates some magnetic activity, but it is difficult to explain the observed amplitudes by magnetic phenomena unless they are combined with cloud inhomogeneities (which might have a magnetic cause). However, inhomogenous cloudcover alone can explain all our observations, and our data align with theory in requiring that the regions with the thickest clouds also have the lowest effective temperature. Combined with published v sin(i) results, our rotation period yields a 95% confidence lower limit of 0.111 solar radii on the radius of DENIS-P J1058.7-1548, suggesting upper limits of 320 Myr and 0.055 solar masses on the age and mass. These limits should be regarded cautiously because of 3-sigma inconsistencies with other data; however, a lower limit of 45 degrees on the inclination is more secure. DENIS-P J1058.7-1548 is only the first of nearly two dozen low-amplitude variables discovered and analyzed by the Weather on Other Worlds project.
  • Heterogeneous clouds or temperature perturbations in rotating brown dwarfs produce variability in the observed flux. We report time-resolved simultaneous observations of the variable T6.5 brown dwarf 2MASSJ22282889-431026 over the wavelength ranges 1.1-1.7 microns and broadband 4.5 microns. Spectroscopic observations were taken with Wide Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope and photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The object shows sinusoidal infrared variability with a period of 1.4 hr at most wavelengths with peak-to-peak amplitudes between 1.45% and 5.3% of the mean flux. While the light curve shapes are similar at all wavelengths, their phases differ from wavelength to wavelength with a maximum difference of more than half of a rotational period. We compare the spectra with atmospheric models of different cloud prescriptions, from which we determine the pressure levels probed at different wavelengths. We find that the phase lag increases with decreasing pressure level, or higher altitude. We discuss a number of plausible scenarios that could cause this trend of light curve phase with probed pressure level. These observations are the first to probe heterogeneity in an ultracool atmosphere in both horizontal and vertical directions, and thus are an ideal test case for realistic three dimensional simulations of the atmospheric structure with clouds in brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets.
  • Precise abundances of 18 elements have been derived for ten stars known to host giant planets from high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution echelle spectroscopy. Internal uncertainties in the derived abundances are typically <=0.05 dex. The stars in our sample have all been previously shown to have abundances that correlate with the condensation temperature (T_c) of the elements in the sense of increasing abundances with increasing T_c; these trends have been interpreted as evidence that the stars may have accreted H-depleted planetary material. Our newly derived abundances also correlate positively with T_c, although slopes of linear least-square fits to the [m/H]-T_c relations for all but two stars are smaller here than in previous studies. When considering the refractory elements (T_c > 900 K) only, which may be more sensitive to planet formation processes, the sample can be separated into a group with positive slopes (four stars) and a group with flat or negative slopes (six stars). The four stars with positive slopes have very close-in giant planets (three at 0.05 AU) and slopes that fall above the general Galactic chemical evolution trend. We suggest that these stars have accreted refractory-rich planet material but not to the extent that would increase significantly the overall stellar metallicity. The flat or negative slopes of the remaining six stars are consistent with recent suggestions of a planet formation signature, although we show that the trends may be the result of Galactic chemical evolution.