• In this paper, the authors design a trial to count rational ratios on the interval [0, 1], and plot a normalized frequency statistical graph. Patterns, symmetry and co-linear properties reflected in the graph are confirmed. The main objective is to present a new view of Farey sequence and to explain the inner principle of its procedure. In addition, we compare Farey sequence and Continued fraction in terms of numerical approximation track and clarify the internal reason why we iteratively choose mediant as the next suitable approximation for the first time. Besides, all sorts of Fibonacci-Lucas sequences emerge from the statistical graph.
  • We experimentally simulate the spin networks -- a fundamental description of quantum spacetime at the Planck level. We achieve this by simulating quantum tetrahedra and their interactions. The tensor product of these quantum tetrahedra comprises spin networks. In this initial attempt to study quantum spacetime by quantum information processing, on a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator, we simulate the basic module -- comprising five quantum tetrahedra -- of the interactions of quantum spacetime. By measuring the geometric properties on the corresponding quantum tetrahedra and simulate their interactions, our experiment serves as the basic module that represents the Feynman diagram vertex in the spin-network formulation of quantum spacetime.
  • As of today, no one can tell when a universal quantum computer with thousands of logical quantum bits (qubits) will be built. At present, most quantum computer prototypes involve less than ten individually controllable qubits, and only exist in laboratories for the sake of either the great costs of devices or professional maintenance requirements. Moreover, scientists believe that quantum computers will never replace our daily, every-minute use of classical computers, but would rather serve as a substantial addition to the classical ones when tackling some particular problems. Due to the above two reasons, cloud-based quantum computing is anticipated to be the most useful and reachable form for public users to experience with the power of quantum. As initial attempts, IBM Q has launched influential cloud services on a superconducting quantum processor in 2016, but no other platforms has followed up yet. Here, we report our new cloud quantum computing service -- NMRCloudQ (http://nmrcloudq.com/zh-hans/), where nuclear magnetic resonance, one of the pioneer platforms with mature techniques in experimental quantum computing, plays as the role of implementing computing tasks. Our service provides a comprehensive software environment preconfigured with a list of quantum information processing packages, and aims to be freely accessible to either amateurs that look forward to keeping pace with this quantum era or professionals that are interested in carrying out real quantum computing experiments in person. In our current version, four qubits are already usable with in average 1.26% single-qubit gate error rate and 1.77% two-qubit controlled-NOT gate error rate via randomized benchmaking tests. Improved control precisions as well as a new seven-qubit processor are also in preparation and will be available later.
  • The problem of determining whether a given quantum state is entangled lies at the heart of quantum information processing, which is known to be an NP-hard problem in general. Despite the proposed many methods such as the positive partial transpose (PPT) criterion and the k-symmetric extendibility criterion to tackle this problem in practice, none of them enables a general, effective solution to the problem even for small dimensions. Explicitly, separable states form a high-dimensional convex set, which exhibits a vastly complicated structure. In this work, we build a new separability-entanglement classifier underpinned by machine learning techniques. Our method outperforms the existing methods in generic cases in terms of both speed and accuracy, opening up the avenues to explore quantum entanglement via the machine learning approach.
  • Quantum state tomography is an indispensable but costly part of many quantum experiments. Typically, it requires measurements to be carried in a number of different settings on a fixed experimental setup. The collected data is often informationally overcomplete, with the amount of information redundancy depending on the particular set of measurement settings chosen. This raises a question about how should one optimally take data so that the number of measurement settings necessary can be reduced. Here, we cast this problem in terms of integer programming. For a given experimental setup, standard integer programming algorithms allow us to find the minimum set of readout operations that can realize a target tomographic task. We apply the method to certain basic and practical state tomographic problems in nuclear magnetic resonance experimental systems. The results show that, considerably less readout operations can be found using our technique than it was by using the previous greedy search strategy. Therefore, our method could be helpful for simplifying measurement schemes so as to minimize the experimental effort.
  • Quantum simulation promises to have wide applications in many fields where problems are hard to model with classical computers. Various quantum devices of different platforms have been built to tackle the problems in, say, quantum chemistry, condensed matter physics, and high-energy physics. Here, we report an experiment towards the simulation of quantum gravity by simulating the holographic entanglement entropy. On a six-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator, we demonstrate a key result of Anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory(\adscft) correspondence---the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is demonstrated by measuring the relevant entanglement entropies on the perfect tensor state. The fidelity of our experimentally prepared the six-qubit state is 85.0\% via full state tomography and reaches 93.7\% if the signal-decay due to decoherence is taken into account. Our experiment serves as the basic module of simulating more complex tensor network states that exploring \adscft correspondence. As the initial experimental attempt to study \adscft via quantum information processing, our work opens up new avenues exploring quantum gravity phenomena on quantum simulators.
  • Superposition, arguably the most fundamental property of quantum mechanics, lies at the heart of quantum information science. However, how to create the superposition of any two unknown pure states remains as a daunting challenge. Recently, it is proved that such a quantum protocol does not exist if the two input states are completely unknown, whereas a probabilistic protocol is still available with some prior knowledge about the input states [M. Oszmaniec \emph{et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 110403 (2016)]. The knowledge is that both of the two input states have nonzero overlaps with some given referential state. In this work, we experimentally realize the probabilistic protocol of superposing two pure states in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance system. We demonstrate the feasibility of the protocol by preparing a families of input states, and the average fidelity between the prepared state and expected superposition state is over 99%. Moreover, we experimentally illustrate the limitation of the protocol that it is likely to fail or yields very low fidelity, if the nonzero overlaps are approaching zero. Our experimental implementation can be extended to more complex situations and other quantum systems.
  • Topological orders can be used as media for topological quantum computing --- a promising quantum computation model due to its invulnerability against local errors. Conversely, a quantum simulator, often regarded as a quantum computing device for special purposes, also offers a way of characterizing topological orders. Here, we show how to identify distinct topological orders via measuring their modular $S$ and $T$ matrices. In particular, we employ a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator to study the properties of three topologically ordered matter phases described by the string-net model with two string types, including the $\Z_2$ toric code, doubled semion, and doubled Fibonacci. The third one, non-Abelian Fibonacci order is notably expected to be the simplest candidate for universal topological quantum computing. Our experiment serves as the basic module, built on which one can simulate braiding of non-Abelian anyons and ultimately topological quantum computation via the braiding, and thus provides a new approach of investigating topological orders using quantum computers.
  • Quantum computers promise to outperform their classical counterparts in many applications. Rapid experimental progress in the last two decades includes the first demonstrations of small-scale quantum processors, but realising large-scale quantum information processors capable of universal quantum control remains a challenge. One primary obstacle is the inadequacy of classical computers for the task of optimising the experimental control field as we scale up to large systems. Classical optimisation procedures require a simulation of the quantum system and have a running time that grows exponentially with the number of quantum bits (qubits) in the system. Here we show that it is possible to tackle this problem by using the quantum processor to optimise its own control fields. Using measurement-based quantum feedback control (MQFC), we created a 12-coherence state with the essential control pulse completely designed by a 12-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum processor. The results demonstrate the superiority of MQFC over classical optimisation methods, in both efficiency and accuracy. The time required for MQFC optimisation is linear in the number of qubits, and our 12-qubit system beat a classical computer configured with 2.4 GHz CPU and 8 GB memory. Furthermore, the fidelity of the MQFC-prepared 12-coherence was about 10% better than the best result using classical optimisation, since the feedback approach inherently corrects for unknown imperfections in the quantum processor. As MQFC is readily transferrable to other technologies for universal quantum information processors, we anticipate that this result will open the way to scalably and precisely control quantum systems, bringing us closer to a demonstration of quantum supremacy.
  • To exploit a given physical system for quantum information processing, it is critical to understand the different types of noise affecting quantum control. Distinguishing coherent and incoherent errors is extremely useful as they can be reduced in different ways. Coherent errors are generally easier to reduce at the hardware level, e.g. by improving calibration, whereas some sources of incoherent errors, e.g. T2* processes, can be reduced by engineering robust pulses. In this work, we illustrate how purity benchmarking and randomized benchmarking can be used together to distinguish between coherent and incoherent errors and to quantify the reduction in both of them due to using optimal control pulses and accounting for the transfer function in an electron spin resonance system. We also prove that purity benchmarking provides bounds on the optimal fidelity and diamond norm that can be achieved by correcting the coherent errors through improving calibration.
  • The Leggett-Garg (LG) test of macroscopic realism involves a series of dichotomic non-invasive measurements that are used to calculate a function which has a fixed upper bound for a macrorealistic system and a larger upper bound for a quantum system. The quantum upper bound depends on both the details of the measurement and the dimension of the system. Here we present an LG experiment on a three-level quantum system, which produces a larger theoretical quantum upper bound than that of a two-level quantum system. The experiment is carried out in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and consists of the LG test as well as a test of the ideal assumptions associated with the experiment, such as measurement non-invasiveness. The non-invasive measurements are performed via the modified ideal negative result measurement scheme on a three-level system. Once these assumptions are tested, the violation becomes small, despite the fact that the LG value itself is large. Our results showcase the advantages of using the modified measurement scheme that can reach the higher LG values, as they give more room for hypothetical malicious errors in a real experiment
  • We investigate quantum state tomography (QST) for pure states and quantum process tomography (QPT) for unitary channels via $adaptive$ measurements. For a quantum system with a $d$-dimensional Hilbert space, we first propose an adaptive protocol where only $2d-1$ measurement outcomes are used to accomplish the QST for $all$ pure states. This idea is then extended to study QPT for unitary channels, where an adaptive unitary process tomography (AUPT) protocol of $d^2+d-1$ measurement outcomes is constructed for any unitary channel. We experimentally implement the AUPT protocol in a 2-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance system. We examine the performance of the AUPT protocol when applied to Hadamard gate, $T$ gate ($\pi/8$ phase gate), and controlled-NOT gate, respectively, as these gates form the universal gate set for quantum information processing purpose. As a comparison, standard QPT is also implemented for each gate. Our experimental results show that the AUPT protocol that reconstructing unitary channels via adaptive measurements significantly reduce the number of experiments required by standard QPT without considerable loss of fidelity.
  • Quantum state tomography via local measurements is an efficient tool for characterizing quantum states. However it requires that the original global state be uniquely determined (UD) by its local reduced density matrices (RDMs). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a class of states that are UD by their RDMs under the assumption that the global state is pure, but fail to be UD in the absence of that assumption. This discovery allows us to classify quantum states according to their UD properties, with the requirement that each class be treated distinctly in the practice of simplifying quantum state tomography. Additionally we experimentally test the feasibility and stability of performing quantum state tomography via the measurement of local RDMs for each class. These theoretical and experimental results advance the project of performing efficient and accurate quantum state tomography in practice.
  • Given its importance to many other areas of physics, from condensed matter physics to thermodynamics, time-reversal symmetry has had relatively little influence on quantum information science. Here we develop a network-based picture of time-reversal theory, classifying Hamiltonians and quantum circuits as time-symmetric or not in terms of the elements and geometries of their underlying networks. Many of the typical circuits of quantum information science are found to exhibit time-asymmetry. Moreover, we show that time-asymmetry in circuits can be controlled using local gates only, and can simulate time-asymmetry in Hamiltonian evolution. We experimentally implement a fundamental example in which controlled time-reversal asymmetry in a palindromic quantum circuit leads to near-perfect transport. Our results pave the way for using time-symmetry breaking to control coherent transport, and imply that time-asymmetry represents an omnipresent yet poorly understood effect in quantum information science.
  • We examine the problem of finding the minimum number of Pauli measurements needed to uniquely determine an arbitrary $n$-qubit pure state among all quantum states. We show that only $11$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary two-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $16$ measurements, and only $31$ Pauli measurements are needed to determine an arbitrary three-qubit pure state compared to the full quantum state tomography with $64$ measurements. We demonstrate that our protocol is robust under depolarizing error with simulated random pure states. We experimentally test the protocol on two- and three-qubit systems with nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. We show that the pure state tomography protocol saves us a number of measurements without considerable loss of fidelity. We compare our protocol with same-size sets of randomly selected Pauli operators and find that our selected set of Pauli measurements significantly outperforms those random sampling sets. As a direct application, our scheme can also be used to reduce the number of settings needed for pure-state tomography in quantum optical systems.
  • Anyons, quasiparticles living in two-dimensional spaces with exotic exchange statistics, can serve as the fundamental units for fault-tolerant quantum computation. However, experimentally demonstrating anyonic statistics is a challenge due to the technical limitations of current experimental platforms. Here, we take a state perpetration approach to mimic anyons in the Kitaev lattice model using a 7-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator. Anyons are created by dynamically preparing the ground and excited states of the 7-qubit Kitaev lattice model, and are subsequently braided along two distinct, but topologically equivalent, paths. We observe that the phase acquired by the anyons is independent of the path, and coincides with the ideal theoretical predictions when decoherence and implementation errors are taken into account. As the first demonstration of the topological path independence of anyons, our experiment helps to study and exploit the anyonic properties towards the goal of building a topological quantum computer.
  • Entanglement, one of the central mysteries of quantum mechanics, plays an essential role in numerous applications of quantum information theory. A natural question of both theoretical and experimental importance is whether universal entanglement detection is possible without full state tomography. In this work, we prove a no-go theorem that rules out this possibility for any non-adaptive schemes that employ single-copy measurements only. We also examine in detail a previously implemented experiment, which claimed to detect entanglement of two-qubit states via adaptive single-copy measurements without full state tomography. By performing the experiment and analyzing the data, we demonstrate that the information gathered is indeed sufficient to reconstruct the state. These results reveal a fundamental limit for single-copy measurements in entanglement detection, and provides a general framework to study the detection of other interesting properties of quantum states, such as the positivity of partial transpose and the $k$-symmetric extendibility.
  • Precisely characterizing and controlling realistic open quantum systems is one of the most challenging and exciting frontiers in quantum sciences and technologies. In this Letter, we present methods of approximately computing reachable sets for coherently controlled dissipative systems, which is very useful for assessing control performances. We apply this to a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system and implement some tasks of quantum control in open systems at a near optimal performance in view of purity: e.g., increasing polarization and preparing pseudo-pure states. Our work shows interesting and promising applications of environment-assisted quantum dynamics.
  • Quantum computing exploits fundamentally new models of computation based on quantum mechanical properties instead of classical physics, and it is believed that quantum computers are able to dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been one of the most successful platforms amongst all current implementations. It has demonstrated universal controls on the largest number of qubits, and many advanced techniques developed in NMR have been adopted to other quantum systems successfully. In this review, we show how NMR quantum processors can satisfy the general requirements of a quantum computer, and describe advanced techniques developed towards this target. Additionally, we review some recent NMR quantum processor experiments. These experiments include benchmarking protocols, quantum error correction, demonstrations of algorithms exploiting quantum properties, exploring the foundations of quantum mechanics, and quantum simulations. Finally we summarize the concepts and comment on future prospects.
  • Quantum gates in experiment are inherently prone to errors that need to be characterized before they can be corrected. Full characterization via quantum process tomography is impractical and often unnecessary. For most practical purposes, it is enough to estimate more general quantities such as the average fidelity. Here we use a unitary 2-design and twirling protocol for efficiently estimating the average fidelity of Clifford gates, to certify a 7-qubit entangling gate in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum processor. Compared with more than $10^8$ experiments required by full process tomography, we conducted 1656 experiments to satisfy a statistical confidence level of 99%. The average fidelity of this Clifford gate in experiment is 55.1%, and rises to 87.5% if the infidelity due to decoherence is removed. The entire protocol of certifying Clifford gates is efficient and scalable, and can easily be extended to any general quantum information processor with minor modifications.
  • The ability to post-select the outcomes of an experiment is a useful theoretical concept and experimental tool. In the context of weak measurements post-selection can lead to surprising results such as complex weak values outside the range of eigenvalues. Usually post-selection is realized by a projective measurement, which is hard to implement in ensemble systems such as NMR. We demonstrate the first experiment of a weak measurement with post-selection on an NMR quantum information processor. Our setup is used for measuring complex weak values and weak values outside the range of eigenvalues. The scheme for overcoming the problem of post-selection in an ensemble quantum computer is general and can be applied to any circuit-based implementation. This experiment paves the way for studying and exploiting post-selection and weak measurements in systems where projective measurements are hard to realize experimentally.
  • Quantum algorithms could be much faster than classical ones in solving the factoring problem. Adiabatic quantum computation for this is an alternative approach other than Shor's algorithm. Here we report an improved adiabatic factoring algorithm and its experimental realization to factor the number 143 on a liquid crystal NMR quantum processor with dipole-dipole couplings. We believe this to be the largest number factored in quantum-computation realizations, which shows the practical importance of adiabatic quantum algorithms.
  • Quantum ground-state problems are computationally hard problems; for general many-body Hamiltonians, there is no classical or quantum algorithm known to be able to solve them efficiently. Nevertheless, if a trial wavefunction approximating the ground state is available, as often happens for many problems in physics and chemistry, a quantum computer could employ this trial wavefunction to project the ground state by means of the phase estimation algorithm (PEA). We performed an experimental realization of this idea by implementing a variational-wavefunction approach to solve the ground-state problem of the Heisenberg spin model with an NMR quantum simulator. Our iterative phase estimation procedure yields a high accuracy for the eigenenergies (to the 10^-5 decimal digit). The ground-state fidelity was distilled to be more than 80%, and the singlet-to-triplet switching near the critical field is reliably captured. This result shows that quantum simulators can better leverage classical trial wavefunctions than classical computers.
  • Quantum simulation can beat current classical computers with minimally a few tens of qubits and will likely become the first practical use of a quantum computer. One promising application of quantum simulation is to attack challenging quantum chemistry problems. Here we report an experimental demonstration that a small nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) quantum computer is already able to simulate the dynamics of a prototype chemical reaction. The experimental results agree well with classical simulations. We conclude that the quantum simulation of chemical reaction dynamics not computable on current classical computers is feasible in the near future.
  • The method of quantum cloning is divided into two main categories: approximate and probabilistic quantum cloning. The former method is used to approximate an unknown quantum state deterministically, and the latter can be used to faithfully copy the state probabilistically. So far, many approximate cloning machines have been experimentally demonstrated, but probabilistic cloning remains an experimental challenge, as it requires more complicated networks and a higher level of precision control. In this work, we designed an efficient quantum network with a limited amount of resources, and performed the first experimental demonstration of probabilistic quantum cloning in an NMR quantum computer. In our experiment, the optimal cloning efficiency proposed by Duan and Guo [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{80}, 4999 (1998)] is achieved.