• A region under rainfall is a contiguous spatial area receiving positive precipitation at a particular time. The probabilistic behavior of such a region is an issue of interest in meteorological studies. A region under rainfall can be viewed as a shape object of a special kind, where scale and rotational invariance are not necessarily desirable attributes of a mathematical representation. For modeling variation in objects of this type, we propose an approximation of the boundary that can be represented as a real valued function, and arrive at further approximation through functional principal component analysis, after suitable adjustment for asymmetry and incompleteness in the data. The analysis of an open access satellite data set on monsoon precipitation over Eastern India leads to explanation of most of the variation in shapes of the regions under rainfall through a handful of interpretable functions that can be further approximated parametrically. The most important aspect of shape is found to be the size followed by contraction/elongation, mostly along two pairs of orthogonal axes. The different modes of variation are remarkably stable across calendar years and across different thresholds for minimum size of the region.
  • Given two sets of functional data having a common underlying mean function but different degrees of distortion in time measurements, we provide a method of estimating the time transformation necessary to align (or `register') them. This method, which we refer to as kernel-matched registration, is based on maximizing a kernel-based measure of alignment. We prove that the proposed method is consistent under fairly general conditions. Simulation results show superiority of the performance of the proposed method over two existing methods. The proposed method is illustrated through the analysis of three paleoclimatic data sets.
  • Given two sets of functional data having a common underlying mean function but different degrees of distortion in time measurements, we provide a method of estimating the time transformation necessary to align (or `register') them. We prove that the proposed method is consistent under fairly general conditions. Simulation results show superiority of the performance of the proposed method over two existing methods. The proposed method is illustrated through the analysis of three paleoclimatic data sets.
  • It is well known that in a firm real time system with a renewal arrival process, exponential service times and independent and identically distributed deadlines till the end of service of a job, the earliest deadline first (EDF) scheduling policy has smaller loss ratio (expected fraction of jobs, not completed) than any other service time independent scheduling policy, including the first come first served (FCFS). Various modifications to the EDF and FCFS policies have been proposed in the literature, with a view to improving performance. In this article, we compare the loss ratios of these two policies along with some of the said modifications, as well as their counterparts with deterministic deadlines. The results include some formal inequalities and some counter-examples to establish non-existence of an order. A few relations involving loss ratios are posed as conjectures, and simulation results in support of these are reported. These results lead to a complete picture of dominance and non-dominance relations between pairs of scheduling policies, in terms of loss ratios.
  • It is well known that if the power spectral density of a continuous time stationary stochastic process does not have a compact support, data sampled from that process at any uniform sampling rate leads to biased and inconsistent spectrum estimators. In a recent paper, the authors showed that the smoothed periodogram estimator can be consistent, if the sampling interval is allowed to shrink to zero at a suitable rate as the sample size goes to infinity. In this paper, this `shrinking asymptotics' approach is used to obtain the limiting distribution of the smoothed periodogram estimator of spectra and cross-spectra. It is shown that, under suitable conditions, the scaling that ensures weak convergence of the estimator to a limiting normal random vector can range from cube-root of the sample size to square-root of the sample size, depending on the strength of the assumption made. The results are used to construct asymptotic confidence intervals for spectra and cross spectra. It is shown through a Monte-Carlo simulation study that these intervals have appropriate empirical coverage probabilities at moderate sample sizes.
  • In the matter of selection of sample time points for the estimation of the power spectral density of a continuous time stationary stochastic process, irregular sampling schemes such as Poisson sampling are often preferred over regular (uniform) sampling. A major reason for this preference is the well-known problem of inconsistency of estimators based on regular sampling, when the underlying power spectral density is not bandlimited. It is argued in this paper that, in consideration of a large sample property like consistency, it is natural to allow the sampling rate to go to infinity as the sample size goes to infinity. Through appropriate asymptotic calculations under this scenario, it is shown that the smoothed periodogram based on regularly spaced data is a consistent estimator of the spectral density, even when the latter is not band-limited. It transpires that, under similar assumptions, the estimators based on uniformly sampled and Poisson-sampled data have about the same rate of convergence. Apart from providing this reassuring message, the paper also gives a guideline for practitioners regarding appropriate choice of the sampling rate. Theoretical calculations for large samples and Monte-Carlo simulations for small samples indicate that the smoothed periodogram based on uniformly sampled data have less variance and more bias than its counterpart based on Poisson sampled data.
  • A practical constraint that comes in the way of spectrum estimation of a continuous time stationary stochastic process is the minimum separation between successively observed samples of the process. When the underlying process is not band-limited, sampling at any uniform rate leads to aliasing, while certain stochastic sampling schemes, including Poisson process sampling, are rendered infeasible by the constraint of minimum separation. It is shown in this paper that, subject to this constraint, no point process sampling scheme is alias-free for the class of all spectra. It turns out that point process sampling under this constraint can be alias-free for band-limited spectra. However, the usual construction of a consistent spectrum estimator does not work in such a case. Simulations indicate that a commonly used estimator, which is consistent in the absence of this constraint, performs poorly when the constraint is present. These results should help practitioners in rationalizing their expectations from point process sampling as far as spectrum estimation is concerned, and motivate researchers to look for appropriate estimators of bandlimited spectra.