• The effect of spatial localization of states in distributed parameter systems under frozen parametric disorder is well known as the Anderson localization and thoroughly studied for the Schr\"odinger equation and linear dissipation-free wave equations. Some similar (or mimicking) phenomena can occur in dissipative systems such as the thermal convection ones. Specifically, many of these dissipative systems are governed by a modified Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, where the frozen spatial disorder of parameters has been reported to lead to excitation of localized patterns. Imposed advection in the modified Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation can affect the localized patterns in a nontrivial way; it changes the localization properties and suppresses the pattern. The latter effect is considered in this paper by means of both numerical simulation and model reduction, which turns out to be useful for a comprehensive understanding of the bifurcation scenarios in the system. Two possible bifurcation scenarios of advective suppression ("washing-out") of localized patterns are revealed and characterised.
  • Our research is related to the employment of photoplethysmography (PPG) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) techniques (measuring the blood volume and flux, respectively) for the peripheral vascular system. We derive the governing equations of the wave dynamics for the case of extremely inhomogeneous parameters. We argue for the conjecture that the blood-vascular system as a wave-conducting medium should be nearly reflection-free. With the reflectionlessness condition, one can find the general solution to the governing equation and, on the basis of this solution, analyse the relationships between PPG- and LDF-signals.
  • On-site measurements of water salinity (which can be directly evaluated from the electrical conductivity) in deep-sea sediments is technically the primary source of indirect information on the capacity of the marine deposits of methane hydrates. We show the relation between the salinity (chlorinity) profile and the hydrate volume in pores to be significantly affected by non-Fickian contributions to the diffusion flux---the thermal diffusion and the gravitational segregation---which have been previously ignored in the literature on the subject and the analysis of surveys data. We provide amended relations and utilize them for an analysis of field measurements for a real hydrate deposit.