• As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly-imaged exoplanets were all L-type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. (2013) announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ~500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (~1000 K) and our own Solar System's Jupiter (~130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 microns), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 microns) as part of the LEECH exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry to a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well-fit by models with the following parameters: T_eff=544+/-10 K, g<600 m/s^2, [M/H]=0.60+/-0.12, cloud opacity parameter of f_sed=2-5, R=0.96+/-0.07 R_Jup, and log(L)=-6.13+/-0.03 L_Sun, implying a hot start mass of 3-30 M_jup for a conservative age range of 0.1-6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a super-stellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with non-stellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion.
  • We present high-resolution Large Binocular Telescope LBTI/LMIRcam images of the spectroscopic and astrometric binary NO UMa obtained as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. Our H, K$_s$, and L'-band observations resolve the system at angular separations <0.09". The components exhibit significant orbital motion over a span of ~7 months. We combine our imaging data with archival images, published speckle interferometry measurements, and existing spectroscopic velocity data to solve the full orbital solution and estimate component masses. The masses of the K2.0$\pm$0.5 primary and K6.5$\pm$0.5 secondary are 0.83$\pm$0.02 M$_{\odot}$ and 0.64$\pm$0.02 M$_{\odot}$, respectively. We also derive a system distance of d = 25.87$\pm$0.02 pc and revise the Galactic kinematics of NO UMa. Our revised Galactic kinematics confirm NO UMa as a nuclear member of the ~500 Myr old Ursa Major moving group and it is thus a mass and age benchmark. We compare the masses of the NO UMa binary components to those predicted by five sets of stellar evolution models at the age of the Ursa Major group. We find excellent agreement between our measured masses and model predictions with little systematic scatter between the models. NO UMa joins the short list of nearby, bright, late-type binaries having known ages and fully characterized orbits.
  • The red giant L2 Pup started a dimming event in 1994, which is considered to be caused by the ejection of dust clouds. We present near-IR aperture-synthesis imaging of L2 Pup achieved by combining data from VLT/NACO speckle observations and long-baseline interferometric observations with the AMBER instrument of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). We also extracted an 8.7 micron image from the mid-IR VLTI instrument MIDI. Our aim is to spatially resolve the innermost region of the circumstellar environment. The diffraction-limited image at 2.27 micron obtained by bispectrum speckle interferometry with NACO with a spatial resolution of 57 mas shows an elongated component. The aperture-synthesis imaging combining the NACO speckle data and AMBER data (2.2--2.29 micron) with a spatial resolution of 5.6x7.3 mas further resolves not only this elongated component, but also the central star. The reconstructed image reveals that the elongated component is a nearly edge-on disk with a size of ~180x50 mas lying in the E-W direction, and furthermore, that the southern hemisphere of the central star is severely obscured by the equatorial dust lane of the disk. The angular size of the disk is consistent with the distance that the dust clouds that were ejected at the onset of the dimming event should have traveled by the time of our observations, if we assume that the dust clouds moved radially. This implies that the formation of the disk may be responsible for the dimming event. The 8.7 micron image with a spatial resolution of 220 mas extracted from the MIDI data taken in 2004 (seven years before the AMBER and NACO observations) shows an approximately spherical envelope without a signature of the disk. This suggests that the mass loss before the dimming event may have been spherical.
  • Accretion and ejection are tightly connected and represent the fundamental mechanisms regulating star formation. However, the exact physical processes involved are not yet fully understood. We present high angular and spectral resolution observations of the Br Gamma emitting region in the Herbig Ae star HD163296 (MWC275) in order to probe the origin of this line and constrain the physical processes taking place at sub-AU scales in the circumstellar region. By means of VLTI-AMBER observations at high spectral resolution (R~12000), we studied interferometric visibilities, wavelength-differential phases, and closure phases across the Br Gamma line of HD163296. To constrain the physical origin of the Br Gamma line in Herbig Ae stars, all the interferometric observables were compared with the predictions of a line radiative transfer disc wind model. The measured visibilities clearly increase within the Br Gamma line, indicating that the Br Gamma emitting region is more compact than the continuum. By fitting a geometric Gaussian model to the continuum-corrected Br Gamma visibilities, we derived a compact radius of the Br Gamma emitting region of ~0.07+/-0.02AU (Gaussian half width at half maximum; or a ring-fit radius of ~0.08+/-0.02AU). To interpret the observations, we developed a magneto-centrifugally driven disc wind model. Our best disc wind model is able to reproduce, within the errors, all the interferometric observables and it predicts a launching region with an outer radius of ~0.04AU. However, the intensity distribution of the entire disc wind emitting region extends up to ~0.16AU. Our observations, along with a detailed modelling of the Br Gamma emitting region, suggest that most of the Br Gamma emission in HD163296 originates from a disc wind with a launching region that is over five times more compact than previous estimates of the continuum dust rim radius.
  • In Spring 2013, the LEECH (LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt) survey began its $\sim$130-night campaign from the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) atop Mt Graham, Arizona. This survey benefits from the many technological achievements of the LBT, including two 8.4-meter mirrors on a single fixed mount, dual adaptive secondary mirrors for high Strehl performance, and a cold beam combiner to dramatically reduce the telescope's overall background emissivity. LEECH neatly complements other high-contrast planet imaging efforts by observing stars at L' (3.8 $\mu$m), as opposed to the shorter wavelength near-infrared bands (1-2.4 $\mu$m) of other surveys. This portion of the spectrum offers deep mass sensitivity, especially around nearby adolescent ($\sim$0.1-1 Gyr) stars. LEECH's contrast is competitive with other extreme adaptive optics systems, while providing an alternative survey strategy. Additionally, LEECH is characterizing known exoplanetary systems with observations from 3-5$\mu$m in preparation for JWST.
  • In February 2013, the LEECH (LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt) survey began its 100-night campaign from the Large Binocular Telescope atop Mount Graham in Arizona. LEECH nearly complements other high-contrast planet imaging efforts by observing stars in L' band (3.8 microns) as opposed to the shorter wavelength near-infrared bands (1-2.3 microns). This part of the spectrum offers deeper mass sensitivity for intermediate age (several hundred Myr-old) systems, since their Jovian-mass planets radiate predominantly in the mid-infrared. In this proceedings, we present the science goals for LEECH and a preliminary contrast curve from some early data.
  • We present high spectral resolution aperture-synthesis imaging of the red supergiant Antares (alpha Sco) in individual CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER. The reconstructed images reveal that the star appears differently in the blue wing, line center, and red wing and shows an asymmetrically extended component. The appearance of the star within the CO lines changes drastically within one year, implying a significant change in the velocity field in the atmosphere. Our modeling suggests an outer atmosphere (MOLsphere) extending to 1.2--1.4 stellar radii with CO column densities of (0.5--1)x10^{20} cm^{-2} and a temperature of ~2000 K. While the velocity field in 2009 is characterized by strong upwelling motions at 20--30 km/s, it changed to strong downdrafts in 2010. On the other hand, the AMBER data in the continuum show only a slight deviation from limb-darkened disks and only marginal time variations. We derive a limb-darkened disk diameter of 37.38+/-0.06 mas and a power-law-type limb-darkening parameter of (8.7+/-1.6)x10^{-2} (2009) and 37.31+/-0.09 mas and (1.5+/-0.2)x10^{-1} (2010). We also obtain Teff = 3660+/-120 K and log L/Lsun = 4.88+/-0.23, which suggests a mass of 15+/-5 Msun with an age of 11-15 Myr. This age is consistent with the recently estimated age for the Upper Scorpius OB association. The properties of the outer atmosphere of Antares are similar to those of another well-studied red supergiant, Betelgeuse. The density of the extended outer atmosphere of Antares and Betelgeuse is higher than predicted by the current 3-D convection simulations by at least six orders of magnitude, implying that convection alone cannot explain the formation of the extended outer atmosphere.
  • Classical Be stars are hot non-supergiant stars surrounded by a gaseous circumstellar disk that is responsible for the observed infrared (IR) excess and emission lines. The influence of binarity on these phenomena remains controversial. We followed the evolution of the environment surrounding the binary Be star $\delta$ Scorpii one year before and one year after the 2011 periastron to check for any evidence of a strong interaction between its companion and the primary circumstellar disk. We used the VLTI/AMBER spectro-interferometric instrument operating in the K band in high (12000) spectral resolution to obtain information on both the disk geometry and kinematics. Observations were carried out in two emission lines: Br$\gamma$ (2.172\,$\mu$m) and $\ion{He}{i}$ (2.056\,$\mu$m). We detected some important changes in $\delta$ Scorpii's circumstellar disk geometry between the first observation made in April 2010 and the new observation made in June 2012. During the last two years the disk has grown at a mean velocity of 0.2\,km\,s$^{-1}$. This is compatible with the expansion velocity previously found during the 2001-2007 period. The disk was also found to be asymmetric at both epochs, but with a different morphology in 2010 and 2012. Considering the available spectroscopic data showing that the main changes in the emission-line profiles occurred quickly during the periastron, it is probable that the differences between the 2010 and 2012 disk geometry seen in our interferometric data stem from a disk perturbation caused by the companion tidal effects. However, taking into account that no significant changes have occurred in the disk since the end of the 2011 observing season, it is difficult to understand how this induced inhomogeneity has been "frozen" in the disk for such a long period.
  • We present the results of the fifth Interferometric Imaging Beauty Contest. The contest consists in blind imaging of test data sets derived from model sources and distributed in the OIFITS format. Two scenarios of imaging with CHARA/MIRC-6T were offered for reconstruction: imaging a T Tauri disc and imaging a spotted red supergiant. There were eight different teams competing this time: Monnier with the software package MACIM; Hofmann, Schertl and Weigelt with IRS; Thi\'ebaut and Soulez with MiRA ; Young with BSMEM; Mary and Vannier with MIROIRS; Millour and Vannier with independent BSMEM and MiRA entries; Rengaswamy with an original method; and Elias with the radio-astronomy package CASA. The contest model images, the data delivered to the contestants and the rules are described as well as the results of the image reconstruction obtained by each method. These results are discussed as well as the strengths and limitations of each algorithm.
  • We study the sub-AU-scale circumstellar environment of the Herbig Ae star HD144432 with near-infrared (NIR) VLTI/AMBER observations to investigate the structure of its inner dust disk. The interferometric observations were carried out with the AMBER instrument in the H and K band. We interpret the measured H- and K-band visibilities, the near- and mid-infrared visibilities from the literature, and the SED of HD144432 by using geometric ring models and ring-shaped temperature-gradient disk models with power-law temperature distributions. We derived a K-band ring-fit radius of 0.17 \pm 0.01 AU and an H-band radius of 0.18 \pm 0.01 AU (for a distance of 145 pc). This measured K-band radius of \sim0.17 AU lies in the range between the dust sublimation radius of \sim0.13 AU (predicted for a dust sublimation temperature of 1500 K and gray dust) and the prediction of models including backwarming (\sim0.27 AU). We found that an additional extended halo component is required in both the geometric and temperature-gradient modeling. In the best temperature- gradient model, the disk consists of two components. The inner part of the disk is a thin ring with an inner radius of \sim0.21 AU, a temperature of \sim1600 K, and a ring thickness \sim0.02 AU. The outer part extends from \sim1 AU to \sim10 AU with an inner temperature of \sim400 K. We find that the disk is nearly face-on with an inclination angle of < 28 degree. Our temperature-gradient modeling suggests that the NIR excess is dominated by emission from a narrow, bright rim located at the dust sublimation radius, while an extended halo component contributes \sim6% to the total flux at 2 {\mu}m. The MIR model emission has a two-component structure with \sim20% flux from the inner ring and the rest from the outer part. This two-component structure suggests a disk gap, which is possibly caused by the shadow of a puffed-up inner rim.
  • Due to the recent dramatic technological advances, infrared interferometry can now be applied to new classes of objects, resulting in exciting new science prospects, for instance, in the area of high-mass star formation. Although extensively studied at various wavelengths, the process through which massive stars form is still only poorly understood. For instance, it has been proposed that massive stars might form like low-mass stars by mass accretion through a circumstellar disk/envelope, or otherwise by coalescence in a dense stellar cluster. After discussing the technological challenges which result from the special properties of these objects, we present first near-infrared interferometric observations, which we obtained on the massive YSO IRAS 13481-6124 using VLTI/AMBER infrared long-baseline interferometry and NTT speckle interferometry. From our extensive data set, we reconstruct a model-independent aperture synthesis image which shows an elongated structure with a size of 13x19 AU, consistent with a disk seen under an inclination of 45 degree. The measured wavelength-dependent visibilities and closure phases allow us to derive the radial disk temperature gradient and to detect a dust-free region inside of 9.5 AU from the star, revealing qualitative and quantitative similarities with the disks observed in low-mass star formation. In complementary mid-infrared Spitzer and sub-millimeter APEX imaging observations we detect two bow shocks and a molecular out ow which are oriented perpendicular to the disk plane and indicate the presence of a bipolar outflow emanating from the inner regions of the system.
  • Circumstellar disks are an essential ingredient of the formation of low-mass stars. It is unclear, however, whether the accretion-disk paradigm can also account for the formation of stars more massive than about 10 solar masses, in which strong radiation pressure might halt mass infall. Massive stars may form by stellar merging, although more recent theoretical investigations suggest that the radiative-pressure limit may be overcome by considering more complex, nonspherical infall geometries. Clear observational evidence, such as the detection of compact dusty disks around massive young stellar objects, is needed to identify unambiguously the formation mode of the most massive stars. Here we report near-infrared interferometric observations that spatially resolve the astronomical unit-scale distribution of hot material around a high-mass (approx. 20 solar masses) young stellar object. The image shows an elongated structure with a size of about 13 x 19 astronomical units, consistent with a disk seen at an inclination angle of 45 degree. Using geometric and detailed physical models, we found a radial temperature gradient in the disk, with a dust-free region less than 9.5 astronomical units from the star, qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the disks observed in low-mass star formation. Perpendicular to the disk plane we observed a molecular outflow and two bow shocks, indicating that a bipolar outflow emanates from the inner regions of the system.
  • We report near-IR spectroscopic observations of the Eta Carinae massive binary system during 2008-2009 using VLT/CRIRES. We detect a strong, broad absorption wing in He I 10833 extending up to -1900 km/s across the 2009.0 spectroscopic event. Archival HST/STIS ultraviolet and optical data shows a similar high-velocity absorption (up to -2100 km/s) in the UV resonance lines of Si IV 1394, 1403 across the 2003.5 event. UV lines from low-ionization species, such as Si II 1527, 1533 and C II 1334, 1335, show absorption up to -1200 km/s, indicating that the absorption with v from -1200 to -2100 km/s originates in a region markedly faster and more ionized than the nominal wind of the primary star. Observations obtained at the OPD/LNA during the last 4 spectroscopic cycles (1989-2009) also display high-velocity absorption in He I 10833 during periastron. Based on the OPD/LNA dataset, we determine that material with v < -900 km/s is present in the phase range 0.976 < phi < 1.023 of the spectroscopic cycle, but absent in spectra taken at phi < 0.947 and phi > 1.049. Therefore, we constrain the duration of the high-velocity absorption to be 95 to 206 days (or 0.047 to 0.102 in phase). We suggest that the high-velocity absorption originates from shocked gas in the wind-wind collision zone, at distances of 15 to 45 AU in the line-of-sight to the primary star. Using 3-D hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-wind collision zone, we find that the dense high-velocity gas is in the line-of-sight to the primary star only if the binary system is oriented in the sky so that the companion is behind the primary star during periastron, corresponding to a longitude of periastron of omega ~ 240 to 270 degrees. We study a possible tilt of the orbital plane relative to the Homunculus equatorial plane and conclude that our data are broadly consistent with orbital inclinations in the range i=40 to 60 degrees.
  • One of the aims of next generation optical interferometric instrumentation is to be able to make use of information contained in the visibility phase to construct high dynamic range images. Radio and optical interferometry are at the two extremes of phase corruption by the atmosphere. While in radio it is possible to obtain calibrated phases for the science objects, in the optical this is currently not possible. Instead, optical interferometry has relied on closure phase techniques to produce images. Such techniques allow only to achieve modest dynamic ranges. However, with high contrast objects, for faint targets or when structure detail is needed, phase referencing techniques as used in radio interferometry, should theoretically achieve higher dynamic ranges for the same number of telescopes. Our approach is not to provide evidence either for or against the hypothesis that phase referenced imaging gives better dynamic range than closure phase imaging. Instead we wish to explore the potential of this technique for future optical interferometry and also because image reconstruction in the optical using phase referencing techniques has only been performed with limited success. We have generated simulated, noisy, complex visibility data, analogous to the signal produced in radio interferometers, using the VLTI as a template. We proceeded with image reconstruction using the radio image reconstruction algorithms contained in AIPS IMAGR (CLEAN algorithm). Our results show that image reconstruction is successful in most of our science cases, yielding images with a 4 milliarcsecond resolution in K band. (abridged)
  • Classically, optical and near-infrared interferometry have relied on closure phase techniques to produce images. Such techniques allow us to achieve modest dynamic ranges. In order to test the feasibility of next generation optical interferometers in the context of the VLTI-spectro-imager (VSI), we have embarked on a study of image reconstruction and analysis. Our main aim was to test the influence of the number of telescopes, observing nights and distribution of the visibility points on the quality of the reconstructed images. Our results show that observations using six Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) during one complete night yield the best results in general and is critical in most science cases; the number of telescopes is the determining factor in the image reconstruction outcome. In terms of imaging capabilities, an optical, six telescope VLTI-type configuration and ~200 meter baseline will achieve 4 mas spatial resolution, which is comparable to ALMA and almost 50 times better than JWST will achieve at 2.2 microns. Our results show that such an instrument will be capable of imaging, with unprecedented detail, a plethora of sources, ranging from complex stellar surfaces to microlensing events.
  • New diffraction-limited speckle images of the Red Rectangle in the wavelength range 2.1--3.3 microns with angular resolutions of 44--68 mas and previous speckle images at 0.7--2.2 microns revealed well-resolved bright bipolar outflow lobes and long X-shaped spikes originating deep inside the outflow cavities. This set of high-resolution images stimulated us to reanalyze all infrared observations of the Red Rectangle using our two-dimensional radiative transfer code. The new detailed modeling, together with estimates of the interstellar extinction in the direction of the Red Rectangle enabled us to more accurately determine one of the key parameters, the distance D=710 pc with model uncertainties of 70 pc, which is twice as far as the commonly used estimate of 330 pc. The central binary is surrounded by a compact, massive (M=1.2 Msun), very dense dusty torus with hydrogen densities reaching n_H=2.5x10^12 cm^-3 (dust-to-gas mass ratio rho_d/rho~0.01). The bright component of the spectroscopic binary HD 44179 is a post-AGB star with mass M*=0.57 Msun, luminosity L*=6000 Lsun, and effective temperature T*=7750 K. Based on the orbital elements of the binary, we identify its invisible component with a helium white dwarf with Mwd~0.35 Msun, Lwd~100 Lsun, and Twd~6x10^4 K. The hot white dwarf ionizes the low-density bipolar outflow cavities inside the dense torus, producing a small HII region observed at radio wavelengths. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the formation of the Red Rectangle nebula, in which the binary initially had 2.3 and 1.9 Msun components at a separation of 130 Rsun. The nebula was formed in the ejection of a common envelope after Roche lobe overflow by the present post-AGB star.
  • We present bispectrum speckle interferometry observations with the SAO 6 m telescope of the four brightest stars in the Orion Trapezium. Diffraction-limited images with an unprecedented resolution lambda/D of 57 mas and 76 mas were obtained in the H- and K-band, respectively. The The H and K images of Theta1 Ori C (the star responsible for the proplyds) show for the first time that Theta1 Ori C is a close binary with a separation of only 33 mas (H-band observation). The sub-arcsecond companions of Theta1 Ori A and Theta1 Ori B reported by Petr et al. (1998) are confirmed. We use the magnitudes and colors of the companions to derive information about their stellar properties from the HR-diagram. In addition we briefly discuss the multiplicity of the Trapezium stars. Considering both, the visual and the spectroscopic companions of the 4 Trapezium stars, there are at least 7 companions, i.e. at least 1.75 companions per primary on average. This number is clearly higher than that found for the low-mass stars in the Orion Nebula cluster as well as in the field population. This suggests that a different mechanism is at work in the formation of high-mass multiple systems in the dense Trapezium cluster than for low-mass stars.