• Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials are unique in the wide variety of structural and electronic phases they exhibit in the two-dimensional (2D) single-layer limit. Here we show how such polymorphic flexibility can be used to achieve topological states at highly ordered phase boundaries in a new quantum spin Hall insulator (QSHI), 1T'-WSe2. We observe helical states at the crystallographically-aligned interface between quantum a spin Hall insulating domain of 1T'-WSe2 and a semiconducting domain of 1H-WSe2 in contiguous single layers grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The QSHI nature of single-layer 1T'-WSe2 was verified using ARPES to determine band inversion around a 120 meV energy gap, as well as STM spectroscopy to directly image helical edge-state formation. Using this new edge-state geometry we are able to directly confirm the predicted penetration depth of a helical interface state into the 2D bulk of a QSHI for a well-specified crystallographic direction. The clean, well-ordered topological/trivial interfaces observed here create new opportunities for testing predictions of the microscopic behavior of topologically protected boundary states without the complication of structural disorder.
  • Electrons in two-dimensional graphene sheets behave as interacting chiral Dirac fermions and have unique screening properties due to their symmetry and reduced dimensionality. By using a combination of scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements and theoretical modeling we have characterized how graphene's massless charge carriers screen individual charged calcium atoms. A back-gated graphene device configuration has allowed us to directly visualize how the screening length for this system can be tuned with carrier density. Our results provide insight into electron-impurity and electron-electron interactions in a relativistic setting with important consequences for other graphene-based electronic devices.
  • A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • Electrostatic confinement of charge carriers in graphene is governed by Klein tunneling, a relativistic quantum process in which particle-hole transmutation leads to unusual anisotropic transmission at pn junction boundaries. Reflection and transmission at these novel potential barriers should affect the quantum interference of electronic wavefunctions near these boundaries. Here we report the use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to map the electronic structure of Dirac fermions confined by circular graphene pn junctions. These effective quantum dots were fabricated using a new technique involving local manipulation of defect charge within the insulating substrate beneath a graphene monolayer. Inside such graphene quantum dots we observe energy levels corresponding to quasi-bound states and we spatially visualize the quantum interference patterns of confined electrons. Dirac fermions outside these quantum dots exhibit Friedel oscillation-like behavior. Bolstered with a theoretical model describing relativistic particles in a harmonic oscillator potential, our findings yield new insight into the spatial behavior of electrostatically confined Dirac fermions.
  • Nanoscale control of charge doping in two-dimensional (2D) materials permits the realization of electronic analogs of optical phenomena, relativistic physics at low energies, and technologically promising nanoelectronics. Electrostatic gating and chemical doping are the two most common methods to achieve local control of such doping. However, these approaches suffer from complicated fabrication processes that introduce contamination, change material properties irreversibly, and lack flexible pattern control. Here we demonstrate a clean, simple, and reversible technique that permits writing, reading, and erasing of doping patterns for 2D materials at the nanometer scale. We accomplish this by employing a graphene/boron nitride (BN) heterostructure that is equipped with a bottom gate electrode. By using electron transport and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate that spatial control of charge doping can be realized with the application of either light or STM tip voltage excitations in conjunction with a gate electric field. Our straightforward and novel technique provides a new path towards on-demand graphene pn junctions and ultra-thin memory devices.
  • Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) forms a quasicrystal whose structural and electronic properties depend on the angle of rotation between its layers. Here we present a scanning tunneling microscopy study of gate-tunable tBLG devices supported by atomically-smooth and chemically inert hexagonal boron nitride (BN). The high quality of these tBLG devices allows identification of coexisting moir\'e patterns and moir\'e super-superlattices produced by graphene-graphene and graphene-BN interlayer interactions. Furthermore, we examine additional tBLG spectroscopic features in the local density of states beyond the first van Hove singularity. Our experimental data is explained by a theory of moir\'e bands that incorporates ab initio calculations and confirms the strongly non-perturbative character of tBLG interlayer coupling in the small twist-angle regime.
  • Relativistic quantum mechanics predicts that when the charge of a superheavy atomic nucleus surpasses a certain threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes an unusual atomic collapse state; this state exhibits an electron wave function component that falls toward the nucleus, as well as a positron component that escapes to infinity. In graphene, where charge carriers behave as massless relativistic particles, it has been predicted that highly charged impurities should exhibit resonances corresponding to these atomic collapse states. We have observed the formation of such resonances around artificial nuclei (clusters of charged calcium dimers) fabricated on gated graphene devices via atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope. The energy and spatial dependence of the atomic collapse state measured with scanning tunneling microscopy revealed unexpected behavior when occupied by electrons.
  • Defects play a key role in determining the properties of most materials and, because they tend to be highly localized, characterizing them at the single-defect level is particularly important. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has a history of imaging the electronic structure of individual point defects in conductors, semiconductors, and ultrathin films, but single-defect electronic characterization at the nanometer-scale remains an elusive goal for intrinsic bulk insulators. Here we report the characterization and manipulation of individual native defects in an intrinsic bulk hexagonal boron nitride (BN) insulator via STM. Normally, this would be impossible due to the lack of a conducting drain path for electrical current. We overcome this problem by employing a graphene/BN heterostructure, which exploits graphene's atomically thin nature to allow visualization of defect phenomena in the underlying bulk BN. We observe three different defect structures that we attribute to defects within the bulk insulating boron nitride. Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we obtain charge and energy-level information for these BN defect structures. In addition to characterizing such defects, we find that it is also possible to manipulate them through voltage pulses applied to our STM tip.