• We present DARKNESS (the DARK-speckle Near-infrared Energy-resolving Superconducting Spectrophotometer), the first of several planned integral field spectrographs to use optical/near-infrared Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for high-contrast imaging. The photon counting and simultaneous low-resolution spectroscopy provided by MKIDs will enable real-time speckle control techniques and post-processing speckle suppression at framerates capable of resolving the atmospheric speckles that currently limit high-contrast imaging from the ground. DARKNESS is now operational behind the PALM-3000 extreme adaptive optics system and the Stellar Double Coronagraph at Palomar Observatory. Here we describe the motivation, design, and characterization of the instrument, early on-sky results, and future prospects.
  • The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) concept requires an optical coronagraph that provides deep starlight suppression over a broad spectral bandwidth, high throughput for point sources at small angular separation, and insensitivity to temporally-varying, low-order aberrations. Vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that perform optimally on off-axis, monolithic telescopes and may also be designed for segmented telescopes with minor losses in performance. We describe the key advantages of vortex coronagraphs on off-axis telescopes: 1) Unwanted diffraction due to aberrations is passively rejected in several low-order Zernike modes relaxing the wavefront stability requirements for imaging Earth-like planets from <10 to >100 pm rms. 2) Stars with angular diameters >0.1 $\lambda/D$ may be sufficiently suppressed. 3) The absolute planet throughput is >10%, even for unfavorable telescope architectures. 4) Broadband solutions ($\Delta\lambda/\lambda>0.1$) are readily available for both monolithic and segmented apertures. The latter make use of grayscale apodizers in an upstream pupil plane to provide suppression of diffracted light from amplitude discontinuities in the telescope pupil without inducing additional stroke on the deformable mirrors. We set wavefront stability requirements on the telescope, based on a stellar irradiance threshold set at an angular separation of 3$\pm$0.5 $\lambda/D$ from the star, and discuss how some requirements may be relaxed by trading robustness to aberrations for planet throughput.
  • Karen A. Collins, Kevin I. Collins, Joshua Pepper, Jonathan Labadie-Bartz, Keivan Stassun, B. Scott Gaudi, Daniel Bayliss, Joao Bento, Knicole D. Colón, Dax Feliz, David James, Marshall C. Johnson, Rudolf B. Kuhn, Michael B. Lund, Matthew T. Penny, Joseph E. Rodriguez, Robert J. Siverd, Daniel J. Stevens, Xinyu Yao, George Zhou, Mundra Akshay, Giulio F. Aldi, Cliff Ashcraft, Supachai Awiphan, Özgür Baştürk, David Baker, Thomas G. Beatty, Paul Benni, Perry Berlind, G. Bruce Berriman, Zach Berta-Thompson, Allyson Bieryla, Valerio Bozza, Sebastiano Calchi Novati, Michael L. Calkins, Jenna M. Cann, David R. Ciardi, Ian R. Clark, William D. Cochran, David H. Cohen, Dennis Conti, Justin R. Crepp, Ivan A. Curtis, Giuseppe D'Ago, Kenny A. Diazeguigure, Courtney D. Dressing, Franky Dubois, Erica Ellingson, Tyler G. Ellis, Gilbert A. Esquerdo, Phil Evans, Alison Friedli, Akihiko Fukui, Benjamin J. Fulton, Erica J. Gonzales, John C. Good, Joao Gregorio, Tolga Gumusayak, Daniel A. Hancock, Caleb K. Harada, Rhodes Hart, Eric G. Hintz, Hannah Jang-Condell, Elizabeth J. Jeffery, Eric L. N. Jensen, Emiliano Jofré, Michael D. Joner, Aman Kar, David H. Kasper, Burak Keten, John F. Kielkopf, Siramas Komonjinda, Cliff Kotnik, David W. Latham, Jacob Leuquire, Tiffany R. Lewis, Ludwig Logie, Simon J. Lowther, Phillip J. MacQueen, Trevor J. Martin, Dimitri Mawet, Kim K. McLeod, Gabriel Murawski, Norio Narita, Jim Nordhausen, Thomas E. Oberst, Caroline Odden, Peter A. Panka, Romina Petrucci, Peter Plavchan, Samuel N. Quinn, Steve Rau, Phillip A. Reed, Howard Relles, Joe P. Renaud, Gaetano Scarpetta, Rebecca L. Sorber, Alex D. Spencer, Michelle Spencer, Denise C. Stephens, Chris Stockdale, Thiam-Guan Tan, Mark Trueblood, Patricia Trueblood, Siegfried Vanaverbeke, Steven Villanueva Jr., Elizabeth M. Warner, Mary Lou West, Selçuk Yalçınkaya, Rex Yeigh, Roberto Zambelli
    March 5, 2018 astro-ph.EP
    The Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) project has been conducting a photometric survey for transiting planets orbiting bright stars for over ten years. The KELT images have a pixel scale of ~23 arsec per pixel (similar to TESS) and a large point spread function, and the KELT reduction pipeline uses a weighted photometric aperture with radius 3 arcmin. At this angular scale, multiple stars are typically blended in the photometric apertures. In order to identify false positives and confirm transiting exoplanets, we have assembled a follow-up network (KELT-FUN) to conduct imaging with higher spatial resolution, cadence, and photometric precision than the KELT telescopes, as well as spectroscopic observations of the candidate host stars. The KELT-FUN team has followed-up over 1,600 planet candidates since 2011, resulting in more than 20 planet discoveries. We present an all-sky catalog of 1,081 bright stars (6<V<13) that show transit-like features in the KELT light curves. These stars were originally identified as planet candidates, but were subsequently determined to be astrophysical false positives (FPs) after photometric and/or spectroscopic follow-up observations. The remaining ~500 retired planet candidates have been classified as false alarms (instrumental or systematic noise). The KELT-FUN team continues to pursue KELT and other planet candidates and will eventually follow up certain classes of TESS candidates. The KELT FP catalog will help minimize the duplication of follow-up observations by current and future transit surveys such as TESS.
  • The vector vortex is a coronagraphic imaging mode of the recently commissioned Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme-Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) platform on the 8-m Subaru Telescope. This multi-purpose high-contrast visible and near-infrared (R- to K-band) instrument is not only intended to serve as a VLT-class "planet-imager" instrument in the Northern hemisphere, but also to operate as a technology demonstration testbed ahead of the ELTs-era, with a particular emphasis on small inner-working angle (IWA) coronagraphic capabilities. The given priority to small-IWA imaging led to the early design choice to incorporate focal-plane phase-mask coronagraphs. In this context, a test H-band vector vortex liquid crystal polymer waveplate was provided to SCExAO, to allow a one-to-one comparison of different small-IWA techniques on the same telescope instrument, before considering further steps. Here we present a detailed overview of the vector vortex coronagraph, from its installation and performances on the SCExAO optical bench, to the on-sky results in the extreme AO regime, as of late 2016/early 2017. To this purpose, we also provide a few recent on-sky imaging examples, notably high-contrast ADI detection of the planetary-mass companion \kappa Andromedae b, with a signal-to-noise ratio above 100 reached in less than 10 mn exposure time.
  • As planning for the next generation of high contrast imaging instruments (e.g. WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR, TMT-PFI, EELT-EPICS) matures, and second-generation ground-based extreme adaptive optics facilities (e.g. VLT-SPHERE, Gemini-GPI) are halfway through their principal surveys, it is imperative that the performance of different designs, post-processing algorithms, observing strategies, and survey results be compared in a consistent, statistically robust framework. In this paper, we argue that the current industry standard for such comparisons -- the contrast curve -- falls short of this mandate. We propose a new figure of merit, the "performance map," that incorporates three fundamental concepts in signal detection theory: the true positive fraction (TPF), false positive fraction (FPF), and detection threshold. By supplying a theoretical basis and recipe for generating the performance map, we hope to encourage the widespread adoption of this new metric across subfields in exoplanet imaging.
  • We describe a joint high contrast imaging survey for planets at Keck and VLT of the last large sample of debris disks identified by the Spitzer Space Telescope. No new substellar companions were discovered in our survey of 30 Spitzer-selected targets. We combine our observations with data from four published surveys to place constraints on the frequency of planets around 130 debris disk single stars, the largest sample to date. For a control sample, we assembled contrast curves from several published surveys targeting 277 stars which do not show infrared excesses. We assumed a double power law distribution in mass and semi-major axis of the form f(m,a) = $Cm^{\alpha}a^{\beta}$, where we adopted power law values and logarithmically flat values for the mass and semi-major axis of planets. We find that the frequency of giant planets with masses 5-20 $M_{\rm Jup}$ and separations 10-1000 AU around stars with debris disks is 6.27% (68% confidence interval 3.68 - 9.76%), compared to 0.73% (68% confidence interval 0.20 - 1.80%) for the control sample of stars without disks. These distributions differ at the 88% confidence level, tentatively suggesting distinctness of these samples.
  • As the performance of coronagraphs improves, the achievable contrast is more and more dependent of the shape of the pupil. The future generation of space and ground based coronagraphic instruments will have to achieve high contrast levels on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes. To correct for the high amplitude aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror, we explore a two deformable mirror (DM) method. The major difficulty of several DM methods is the non-linear relation linking actuator strokes to the point spread function in the coronagraph focal plane. The Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) method is achieving this minimization by solving a non linear differential Monge Ampere equation. Once this open loop method have reached the minimum, a close-loop stroke minimization method can be applied to correct for phase and amplitude aberrations to achieve the ultimate contrast. In this paper, I describe the results of the parametric analysis that that I have undertaken on this method. After recalling the principle of the method, I will described the explored parameter space (deformable mirror set-up, shape of the pupil, bandwidth, coronagraph designs). I will precisely described the way I simulated the Vortex coronagraph for this numerical simulation. Finally I will present the preliminary results of this parametric analysis for space telescope pupils only.
  • The current generation of ground-based coronagraphic instruments uses deformable mirrors to correct for phase errors and to improve contrast levels at small angular separations. Improving these techniques, several space and ground based instruments are currently developed using two deformable mirrors to correct for both phase and amplitude errors. However, as wavefront control techniques improve, more complex telescope pupil geometries will soon be a limiting factor for these next generation coronagraphic instru- ments. The technique presented in this proceeding, the Active Correction of Aperture Discontinuities method, is taking advantage of the fact that most future coronagraphic instruments will include two deformable mirrors, and is proposing to find the shapes and actuator movements to correct for the effect introduced by these complex pupil geometries. We here present the results of the parametric analysis realized on the WFIRST pupil for which we obtained high contrast levels with several deformable mirror setups (size, separation between them), coronagraphs (Vortex charge 2, vortex charge 4, APLC) and spectral bandwidths. However, because contrast levels and separation are not the only metrics to maximize the scientific return of an instrument, we also included in this study the influence of these deformable mirror shapes on the throughput of the instrument and sensitivity to pointing jitters. Finally, we present results obtained on another potential space based telescope segmented aperture. The main result of this proceeding is that we now obtain comparable performance than the coronagraphs previously designed for WFIRST. First result from the parametric analysis strongly suggest that the 2 deformable mirror set up (size and distance between them) has a important impact on the performance in contrast and throughput of the final instrument.
  • The detection of molecular species in the atmospheres of earth-like exoplanets orbiting nearby stars requires an optical system that suppresses starlight and maximizes the sensitivity to the weak planet signals at small angular separations. Achieving sufficient contrast performance on a segmented aperture space telescope is particularly challenging due to unwanted diffraction within the telescope from amplitude and phase discontinuities in the pupil. Apodized vortex coronagraphs are a promising solution that theoretically meet the performance needs for high contrast imaging with future segmented space telescopes. We investigate the sensitivity of apodized vortex coronagraphs to the expected aberrations, including segment co-phasing errors in piston and tip/tilt as well as other low-order and mid-spatial frequency aberrations. Coronagraph designs and their associated telescope requirements are identified for conceptual HabEx and LUVOIR telescope designs.
  • We present the first scattered light image of the debris disk around HD 129590, a ~1.3 M$_\odot$ G1V member of the Scorpius Centaurus association with age ~10-16 Myr. The debris disk is imaged with the high contrast imaging instrument SPHERE at the Very Large Telescope, and is revealed by both the IRDIS and IFS subsytems, operating in the H and YJ bands respectively. The disk has a high infrared luminosity of $L_{\textrm{IR}}/L_{\textrm{star}}$~5$\times$10$^{-3}$, and has been resolved in other studies using ALMA. We detect a nearly edge on ring, with evidence of an inner clearing. We fit the debris disk using a model characterized by a single bright ring, with radius ~60-70 AU, in broad agreement with previous analysis of the target SED. The disk is vertically thin, and has an inclination angle of ~75$^\circ$. Along with other previously imaged edge-on disks in the Sco-Cen association such as HD 110058, HD 115600, and HD 111520, this disk image will allow of the structure and morphology of very young debris disks, shortly after the epoch of planet formation has ceased.
  • Our Keck/NIRC2 imaging survey searches for stellar companions around 144 systems with radial velocity (RV) detected giant planets to determine whether stellar binaries influence the planets' orbital parameters. This survey, the largest of its kind to date, finds eight confirmed binary systems and three confirmed triple systems. These include three new multi-stellar systems (HD 30856, HD 86081, and HD 207832) and three multi-stellar systems with newly confirmed common proper motion (HD 43691, HD 116029, and HD 164509). We combine these systems with seven RV planet-hosting multi-stellar systems from the literature in order to test for differences in the properties of planets with semimajor axes ranging between 0.1-5 au in single vs multi-stellar systems. We find no evidence that the presence or absence of stellar companions alters the distribution of planet properties in these systems. Although the observed stellar companions might influence the orbits of more distant planetary companions in these systems, our RV observations currently provide only weak constraints on the masses and orbital properties of planets beyond 5 au. In order to aid future efforts to characterize long period RV companions in these systems, we publish our contrast curves for all 144 targets. Using four years of astrometry for six hierarchical triple star systems hosting giant planets, we fit the orbits of the stellar companions in order to characterize the orbital architecture in these systems. We find that the orbital plane of the secondary and tertiary companions are inconsistent with an edge-on orbit in four out of six cases.
  • Direct imaging of exoplanets presents a formidable technical challenge owing to the small angular separation and high contrast between exoplanets and their host stars. High Dispersion Coronagraphy (HDC) is a pathway to achieve unprecedented sensitivity to Earth-like planets in the habitable zone. Here, we present a framework to simulate HDC observations and data analyses. The goal of these simulations is to perform a detailed analysis of the trade-off between raw star light suppression and spectral resolution for various instrument configurations, target types, and science cases. We predict the performance of an HDC instrument at Keck observatory for characterizing directly imaged gas-giant planets in near infrared bands. We also simulate HDC observations of an Earth-like planet using next-generation ground-based (TMT) and spaced-base telescopes (HabEx and LUVOIR). We conclude that ground-based ELTs are more suitable for HDC observations of an Earth-like planet than future space-based missions owing to the considerable difference in collecting area. For ground-based telescopes, HDC observations can detect an Earth-like planet in the habitable zone around an M dwarf star at 10$^{-4}$ starlight suppression level. Compared to the 10$^{-7}$ planet/star contrast, HDC relaxes the starlight suppression requirement by a factor of 10$^3$. For space-based telescopes, detector noise will be a major limitation at spectral resolutions higher than 10$^4$. Considering detector noise and speckle chromatic noise, R=400 (1600) is the optimal spectral resolutions for HabEx(LUVOIR). The corresponding starlight suppression requirement to detect a planet with planet/star contrast=$6.1\times10^{-11}$ is relaxed by a factor of 10 (100) for HabEx (LUVOIR).
  • High-dispersion coronagraphy (HDC) optimally combines high contrast imaging techniques such as adaptive optics/wavefront control plus coronagraphy to high spectral resolution spectroscopy. HDC is a critical pathway towards fully characterizing exoplanet atmospheres across a broad range of masses from giant gaseous planets down to Earth-like planets. In addition to determining the molecular composition of exoplanet atmospheres, HDC also enables Doppler mapping of atmosphere inhomogeneities (temperature, clouds, wind), as well as precise measurements of exoplanet rotational velocities. Here, we demonstrate an innovative concept for injecting the directly-imaged planet light into a single-mode fiber, linking a high-contrast adaptively-corrected coronagraph to a high-resolution spectrograph (diffraction-limited or not). Our laboratory demonstration includes three key milestones: close-to-theoretical injection efficiency, accurate pointing and tracking, on-fiber coherent modulation and speckle nulling of spurious starlight signal coupling into the fiber. Using the extreme modal selectivity of single-mode fibers, we also demonstrated speckle suppression gains that outperform conventional image-based speckle nulling by at least two orders of magnitude.
  • Many brown dwarfs exhibit photometric variability at levels from tenths to tens of percents. The photometric variability is related to magnetic activity or patchy cloud coverage, characteristic of brown dwarfs near the L-T transition. Time-resolved spectral monitoring of brown dwarfs provides diagnostics of cloud distribution and condensate properties. However, current time-resolved spectral studies of brown dwarfs are limited to low spectral resolution (R$\sim$100) with the exception of the study of Luhman 16 AB at resolution of 100,000 using the VLT$+$CRIRES. This work yielded the first map of brown dwarf surface inhomogeneity, highlighting the importance and unique contribution of high spectral resolution observations. Here, we report on the time-resolved high spectral resolution observations of a nearby brown dwarf binary, 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB. We find no coherent spectral variability that is modulated with rotation. Based on simulations we conclude that the coverage of a single spot on 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB is smaller than 1\% or 6.25\% if spot contrast is 50\% or 80\% of its surrounding flux, respectively. Future high spectral resolution observations aided by adaptive optics systems can put tighter constraints on the spectral variability of 2MASSW J0746425+200032AB and other nearby brown dwarfs.
  • The masses, atmospheric makeups, spin-orbit alignments, and system architectures of extrasolar planets can be best studied when the planets orbit bright stars. We report the discovery of three bodies orbiting HD 106315, a bright (V = 8.97 mag) F5 dwarf targeted by our K2 survey for transiting exoplanets. Two small, transiting planets have radii of 2.23 (+0.30/-0.25) R_Earth and 3.95 (+0.42/-0.39) R_Earth and orbital periods of 9.55 d and 21.06 d, respectively. A radial velocity (RV) trend of 0.3 +/- 0.1 m/s/d indicates the likely presence of a third body orbiting HD 106315 with period >160 d and mass >45 M_Earth. Transits of this object would have depths of >0.1% and are definitively ruled out. Though the star has v sin i = 13.2 km/s, it exhibits short-timescale RV variability of just 6.4 m/s, and so is a good target for RV measurements of the mass and density of the inner two planets and the outer object's orbit and mass. Furthermore, the combination of RV noise and moderate v sin i makes HD 106315 a valuable laboratory for studying the spin-orbit alignment of small planets through the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. Space-based atmospheric characterization of the two transiting planets via transit and eclipse spectroscopy should also be feasible. This discovery demonstrates again the power of K2 to find compelling exoplanets worthy of future study.
  • We announce the discovery of KELT-16b, a highly irradiated, ultra-short period hot Jupiter transiting the relatively bright ($V = 11.7$) star TYC 2688-1839-1. A global analysis of the system shows KELT-16 to be an F7V star with $T_\textrm{eff} = 6236\pm54$ K, $\log{g_\star} = 4.253_{-0.036}^{+0.031}$, [Fe/H] = -0.002$_{-0.085}^{+0.086}$, $M_\star = 1.211_{-0.046}^{+0.043} M_\odot$, and $R_\star = 1.360_{-0.053}^{+0.064} R_\odot$. The planet is a relatively high mass inflated gas giant with $M_\textrm{P} = 2.75_{-0.15}^{+0.16} M_\textrm{J}$, $R_\textrm{P} = 1.415_{-0.067}^{+0.084} R_\textrm{J}$, density $\rho_\textrm{P} = 1.20\pm0.18$ g cm$^{-3}$, surface gravity $\log{g_\textrm{P}} = 3.530_{-0.049}^{+0.042}$, and $T_\textrm{eq} = 2453_{-47}^{+55}$ K. The best-fitting linear ephemeris is $T_\textrm{C} = 2457247.24791\pm0.00019$ BJD$_{tdb}$ and $P = 0.9689951 \pm 0.0000024$ d. KELT-16b joins WASP-18b, -19b, -43b, -103b, and HATS-18b as the only giant transiting planets with $P < 1$ day. Its ultra-short period and high irradiation make it a benchmark target for atmospheric studies by HST, Spitzer, and eventually JWST. For example, as a hotter, higher mass analog of WASP-43b, KELT-16b may feature an atmospheric temperature-pressure inversion and day-to-night temperature swing extreme enough for TiO to rain out at the terminator. KELT-16b could also join WASP-43b in extending tests of the observed mass-metallicity relation of the Solar System gas giants to higher masses. KELT-16b currently orbits at a mere $\sim$ 1.7 Roche radii from its host star, and could be tidally disrupted in as little as a few $\times 10^{5}$ years (for a stellar tidal quality factor of $Q_*' = 10^5$). Finally, the likely existence of a widely separated bound stellar companion in the KELT-16 system makes it possible that Kozai-Lidov oscillations played a role in driving KELT-16b inward to its current precarious orbit.
  • A vortex coronagraph is now available for high contrast observations with the Keck/NIRC2 instrument at L band. Reaching the optimal performance of the coronagraph requires fine control of the wavefront incident on the phase mask. In particular, centering errors can lead to significant stellar light leakage that degrades the contrast performance and prevents the observation of faint planetary companions around the observed stars. It is thus critical to correct for the possible slow drift of the star image from the phase mask center, generally due to mechanical flexures induced by temperature and/or gravity field variation, or to misalignment between the optics that rotate in pupil tracking mode. A control loop based on the QACITS algorithm for the vortex coronagraph has thus been developed and deployed for the Keck/NIRC2 instrument. This algorithm executes the entire observing sequence, including the calibration steps, initial centering of the star on the vortex center and stabilisation during the acquisition of science frames. On-sky data show that the QACITS control loop stabilizes the position of the star image down to 2.4 mas rms at a frequency of about 0.02 Hz. However, the accuracy of the estimator is probably limited by a systematic error due to a misalignment of the Lyot stop with respect to the entrance pupil, estimated to be on the order of 4.5 mas. A method to reduce the amplitude of this bias down to 1 mas is proposed. The QACITS control loop has been successfully implemented and provides a robust method to center and stabilize the star image on the vortex mask. In addition, QACITS ensures a repeatable pointing quality and significantly improves the observing efficiency compared to manual operations. It is now routinely used for vortex coronagraph observations at Keck/NIRC2, providing contrast and angular resolution capabilities suited for exoplanet and disk imaging.
  • HR4796A is surrounded by a debris disc, observed in scattered light as an inclined ring. Past observations raised several questions. First, a strong brightness asymmetry detected in polarized reflected light recently challenged our understanding of scattering by the dust particles in this system. Secondly, the morphology of the ring strongly suggests the presence of planets, although no planets have been detected to date. We obtained high-angular resolution coronagraphic images of the circumstellar environment around HR4796A with VLT/SPHERE during the commissioning of the instrument in May 2014 and during guaranteed-time observations in February 2015. The observations reveal for the first time the entire ring of dust, including the semi-minor axis that was previously hidden either behind the coronagraphic spot or in the speckle noise. We determine empirically the scattering phase function of the dust in the H band from 13.6deg to 166.6deg. It shows a prominent peak of forward scattering, never detected before, for scattering angles below 30deg. We analyse the reflectance spectra of the disc from the 0.95 to 1.6 microns, confirming the red colour of the dust, and derive detection limits on the presence of planetary mass objects. We confirm which side of the disc is inclined towards the Earth. The analysis of the phase function suggests that the dust population is dominated by particles much larger than the observation wavelength, of about 20 microns. Compact Mie grains of this size are incompatible with the spectral energy distribution of the disc, however the observed rise in scattering efficiency beyond 50deg points towards aggregates which could reconcile both observables. We do not detect companions orbiting the star but our high-contrast observations provide the most stringent constraints yet on the presence of planets responsible for the morphology of the dust.
  • We present here our observations and analysis of the dayside emission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-103b. We observed WASP-103b during secondary eclipse using two visits of the Hubble Space Telescope with the G141 grism on Wide Field Camera 3 in spatial scan mode. We generated secondary eclipse light curves of the planet in both blended white-light and spectrally binned wavechannels from 1.1-1.7 micron and corrected the light curves for flux contamination from a nearby companion star. We modeled the detector systematics and secondary eclipse spectrum using Gaussian process regression and found that the near-IR emission spectrum of WASP-103b is featureless across the observed near-IR region to down to a sensitivity of 175 ppm, and shows a shallow slope towards the red. The atmosphere has a single brightness temperature of T_B = 2890 K across this wavelength range. This region of the spectrum is indistinguishable from isothermal, but may not manifest from a physically isothermal system, i.e. pseudo-isothermal. A Solar-metallicity profile with a thermal inversion layer at 10^-2 bar fits WASP-103b's spectrum with high confidence, as do an isothermal profile with Solar metallicity and a monotonically decreasing atmosphere with C/O>1. The data rule out a monotonically decreasing atmospheric profile with Solar composition, and we rule out a low-metallicity decreasing profile as non-physical for this system. The pseudo-isothermal profile could be explained by a thermal inversion layer just above the layer probed by our observations, or by clouds or haze in the upper atmosphere. Transmission spectra at optical wavelengths would allow us to better differentiate between potential atmospheric models.
  • The development of adaptive optics (AO) played a major role in modern astronomy over the last three decades. By compensating for the atmospheric turbulence, these systems enable to reach the diffraction limit on large telescopes. In this review, we will focus on high contrast applications of adaptive optics, namely, imaging the close vicinity of bright stellar objects and revealing regions otherwise hidden within the turbulent halo of the atmosphere to look for objects with a contrast ratio lower than 10^-4 with respect to the central star. Such high-contrast AO-corrected observations have led to fundamental results in our current understanding of planetary formation and evolution as well as stellar evolution. AO systems equipped three generations of instruments, from the first pioneering experiments in the nineties, to the first wave of instruments on 8m-class telescopes in the years 2000, and finally to the extreme AO systems that have recently started operations. Along with high-contrast techniques, AO enables to reveal the circumstellar environment: massive protoplanetary disks featuring spiral arms, gaps or other asymmetries hinting at on-going planet formation, young giant planets shining in thermal emission, or tenuous debris disks and micron-sized dust leftover from collisions in massive asteroid-belt analogs. After introducing the science case and technical requirements, we will review the architecture of standard and extreme AO systems, before presenting a few selected science highlights obtained with recent AO instruments.
  • HD 141569 A is a pre-main sequence B9.5 Ve star surrounded by a prominent and complex circumstellar disk, likely still in a transition stage from protoplanetary to debris disk phase. Here, we present a new image of the third inner disk component of HD 141569 A made in the L' band (3.8 micron) during the commissioning of the vector vortex coronagraph recently installed in the near-infrared imager and spectrograph NIRC2 behind the W.M. Keck Observatory Keck II adaptive optics system. We used reference point spread function subtraction, which reveals the innermost disk component from the inner working distance of $\simeq 23$ AU and up to $\simeq 70$ AU. The spatial scale of our detection roughly corresponds to the optical and near-infrared scattered light, thermal Q, N and 8.6 micron PAH emission reported earlier. We also see an outward progression in dust location from the L'-band to the H-band (VLT/SPHERE image) to the visible (HST/STIS image), likely indicative of dust blowout. The warm disk component is nested deep inside the two outer belts imaged by HST NICMOS in 1999 (respectively at 406 and 245 AU). We fit our new L'-band image and spectral energy distribution of HD 141569 A with the radiative transfer code MCFOST. Our best-fit models favor pure olivine grains, and are consistent with the composition of the outer belts. While our image shows a putative very-faint point-like clump or source embedded in the inner disk, we did not detect any true companion within the gap between the inner disk and the first outer ring, at a sensitivity of a few Jupiter masses.
  • An optical vortex coronagraph has been implemented within the NIRC2 camera on the Keck II telescope and used to carry out on-sky tests and observations. The development of this new L'-band observational mode is described, and an initial demonstration of the new capability is presented: a resolved image of the low-mass companion to HIP79124, which had previously been detected by means of interferometry. With HIP79124 B at a projected separation of 186.5 mas, both the small inner working angle of the vortex coronagraph and the related imaging improvements were crucial in imaging this close companion directly. Due to higher Strehl ratios and more relaxed contrasts in L' band versus H band, this new coronagraphic capability will enable high-contrast small-angle observations of nearby young exoplanets and disks on a par with those of shorter-wavelength extreme adaptive optics coronagraphs.
  • Uncovering the ingredients and the architecture of planetary systems is a very active field of research that has fuelled many new theories on giant planet formation, migration, composition, and interaction with the circumstellar environment. We aim at discovering and studying new such systems, to further expand our knowledge of how low-mass companions form and evolve. We obtained high-contrast H-band images of the circumstellar environment of the F5V star HD206893, known to host a debris disc never detected in scattered light. These observations are part of the SPHERE High Angular Resolution Debris Disc Survey (SHARDDS) using the InfraRed Dual-band Imager and Spectrograph (IRDIS) installed on VLT/SPHERE. We report the detection of a source with a contrast of 3.6x10^{-5} in the H-band, orbiting at a projected separation of 270 milliarcsecond or 10 au, corresponding to a mass in the range 24 to 73 Mjup for an age of the system in the range 0.2 to 2 Gyr. The detection was confirmed ten months later with VLT/NaCo, ruling out a background object with no proper motion. A faint extended emission compatible with the disc scattered light signal is also observed. The detection of a low-mass companion inside a massive debris disc makes this system an analog of other young planetary systems such as beta Pictoris, HR8799 or HD95086 and requires now further characterisation of both components to understand their interactions.
  • We present the first resolved image of the debris disk around the 16+/-8 Myr old star, HD 114082. The observation was made in the H-band using the SPHERE instrument. The star is at a distance of 92+/-6 pc in the Lower Centaurus Crux association. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, we determined that the debris is likely in the form of a dust ring with an inner edge of 27.7+2.8/-3.5 au, position angle -74+0.5/-1.5 deg, and an inclination with respect to the line of sight of 6.7+3.8/-0.4 deg. The disk imaged in scattered light has a surface density declining with radius like ~r^(-4), steeper than expected for grain blowout by radiation pressure. We find only marginal evidence (2 sigma) of eccentricity, and rule out planets more massive than 1.0 Mjup orbiting within 1 au of the ring's inner edge, since such a planet would have disrupted the disk. The disk has roughly the same fractional disk luminosity (Ldisk/L*=3.3x10^(-3)) as HR4796A and Beta Pictoris, however it was not detected by previous instrument facilities most likely because of its small angular size (radius~0.4"), low albedo (~0.2) and low scattering efficiency far from the star due to high scattering anisotropy. With the arrival of extreme adaptive optics systems like SPHERE and GPI, the morphology of smaller, fainter and more distant debris disks are being revealed, providing clues to planet-disk interactions in young protoplanetary systems.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely red planetary-mass companion to 2MASS J22362452+4751425, a $\approx$0.6 $M_{\odot}$ late-K dwarf likely belonging to the $\sim$120 Myr AB Doradus moving group. 2M2236+4751 b was identified in multi-epoch NIRC2 adaptive optics imaging at Keck Observatory at a separation of 3.7$"$, or 230 $\pm$ 20 AU in projection at the kinematic distance of 63 $\pm$ 5 pc to its host star. Assuming membership in the AB Dor group, as suggested from its kinematics, the inferred mass of 2M2236+4751 b is 11-14 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$. Follow-up Keck/OSIRIS $K$-band spectroscopy of the companion reveals strong CO absorption similar to other faint red L dwarfs and lacks signs of methane absorption despite having an effective temperature of $\approx$900-1200 K. With a ($J$-$K$)$_\mathrm{MKO}$ color of 2.69 $\pm$ 0.12 mag, the near-infrared slope of 2M2236+4751 b is redder than all of the HR 8799 planets and instead resembles the $\approx$23 Myr isolated planetary-mass object PSO J318.5-22, implying that similarly thick photospheric clouds can persist in the atmospheres of giant planets at ages beyond 100 Myr. In near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams, 2M2236+4751 b is located at the tip of the red L dwarf sequence and appears to define the "elbow" of the AB Dor substellar isochrone separating low-gravity L dwarfs from the cooler young T dwarf track. 2M2236+4751 b is the reddest substellar companion to a star and will be a valuable benchmark to study the shared atmospheric properties of young low-mass brown dwarfs and extrasolar giant planets.