• Observations suggest that there is a significant fraction of O-stars in the field of the Milky Way that appear to have formed in isolation or in low mass clusters ($<$100 $M_\odot$). The existence of these high-mass stars that apparently formed in the field challenges the generally accepted paradigm, which requires star formation to occur in clustered environments. In order to understand the physical conditions for the formation of these stars, it is necessary to observe isolated high-mass stars while they are still forming. With the $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$, we observe the seven most isolated massive ($>$8 $M_\odot$) young stellar objects (MYSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations show that while these MYSOs are remote from other MYSOs, OB associations, and even from known giant molecular clouds, they are actually not isolated at all. Imaging reveals $\sim$100 to several hundred pre--main-sequence (PMS) stars in the vicinity of each MYSO. These previously undetected PMS stars form prominent compact clusters around the MYSOs, and in most cases they are also distributed sparsely across the observed regions. Contrary to what previous high-mass field star studies show, these observations suggest that high-mass stars may not be able to form in clusters with masses less than 100 $M_\odot$. If these MYSOs are indeed the best candidates for isolated high-mass star formation, then the lack of isolation is at odds with random sampling of the IMF. Moreover, while isolated MYSOs may not exist, we find evidence that isolated clusters containing O-stars can exist, which in itself is rare.
  • We report on the study of interstellar extinction across the Tarantula nebula (30 Doradus), in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using observations from the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project in the 0.3 - 1.6 micron range. The considerable and patchy extinction inside the nebula causes about 3500 red clump stars to be scattered along the reddening vector in the colour-magnitude diagrams, thereby allowing an accurate determination of the reddening slope in all bands. The measured slope of the reddening vector is remarkably steeper in all bands than in the the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. At optical wavelengths, the larger ratio of total-to-selective extinction, namely Rv = 4.5 +/- 0.2, implies the presence of a grey component in the extinction law, due to a larger fraction of large grains. The extra large grains are most likely ices from supernova ejecta and will significantly alter the extinction properties of the region until they sublimate in 50 - 100 Myr. We discuss the implications of this extinction law for the Tarantula nebula and in general for regions of massive star formation in galaxies. Our results suggest that fluxes of strongly star forming regions are likely to be underestimated by a factor of about 2 in the optical.
  • We have undertaken the largest systematic study of the high-mass stellar initial mass function (IMF) to date using the optical color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of 85 resolved, young (4 Myr < t < 25 Myr), intermediate mass star clusters (10^3-10^4 Msun), observed as part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program. We fit each cluster's CMD to measure its mass function (MF) slope for stars >2 Msun. For the ensemble of clusters, the distribution of stellar MF slopes is best described by $\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$ with a very small intrinsic scatter. The data also imply no significant dependencies of the MF slope on cluster age, mass, and size, providing direct observational evidence that the measured MF represents the IMF. This analysis implies that the high-mass IMF slope in M31 clusters is universal with a slope ($\Gamma=+1.45^{+0.03}_{-0.06}$) that is steeper than the canonical Kroupa (+1.30) and Salpeter (+1.35) values. Using our inference model on select Milky Way (MW) and LMC high-mass IMF studies from the literature, we find $\Gamma_{\rm MW} \sim+1.15\pm0.1$ and $\Gamma_{\rm LMC} \sim+1.3\pm0.1$, both with intrinsic scatter of ~0.3-0.4 dex. Thus, while the high-mass IMF in the Local Group may be universal, systematics in literature IMF studies preclude any definitive conclusions; homogenous investigations of the high-mass IMF in the local universe are needed to overcome this limitation. Consequently, the present study represents the most robust measurement of the high-mass IMF slope to date. We have grafted the M31 high-mass IMF slope onto widely used sub-solar mass Kroupa and Chabrier IMFs and show that commonly used UV- and Halpha-based star formation rates should be increased by a factor of ~1.3-1.5 and the number of stars with masses >8 Msun are ~25% fewer than expected for a Salpeter/Kroupa IMF. [abridged]
  • We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (a) fully exploits the information content of a given dataset; (b) accounts for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (c) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (d) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (e) is applicable to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high mass stellar MF (M > 1 Msun). Using simulated clusters and Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, {\alpha}, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, {\Delta}{\alpha}, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and stellar mass range they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are well-characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the lower limit precision on {\alpha} and provide an analytic approximation for {\Delta}{\alpha} as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. We find that ~ 3/4 of quoted literature uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find the literature studies yield <{\alpha}>=2.46 with a 1-{\sigma} dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the IMF. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires: (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates; (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses; and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the completeness for stars of a given mass. (abridged)
  • [Abridged] The stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF) suggests that sub-solar stars form in very large numbers. Most attractive places for catching low-mass star formation in the act are young stellar clusters and associations, still (half-)embedded in star-forming regions. The low-mass stars in such regions are still in their pre--main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary phase. The peculiar nature of these objects and the contamination of their samples by the evolved populations of the Galactic disk impose demanding observational techniques for the detection of complete numbers of PMS stars in the Milky Way. The Magellanic Clouds, the companion galaxies to our own, demonstrate an exceptional star formation activity. The low extinction and stellar field contamination in star-forming regions of these galaxies imply a more efficient detection of low-mass PMS stars than in the Milky Way, but their distance from us make the application of special detection techniques unfeasible. Nonetheless, imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope yield the discovery of solar and sub-solar PMS stars in the Magellanic Clouds from photometry alone. Unprecedented numbers of such objects are identified as the low-mass stellar content of their star-forming regions, changing completely our picture of young stellar systems outside the Milky Way, and extending the extragalactic stellar IMF below the persisting threshold of a few solar masses. This review presents the recent developments in the investigation of PMS stars in the Magellanic Clouds, with special focus on the limitations by single-epoch photometry that can only be circumvented by the detailed study of the observable behavior of these stars in the color-magnitude diagram. The achieved characterization of the low-mass PMS stars in the Magellanic Clouds allowed thus a more comprehensive understanding of the star formation process in our neighboring galaxies.
  • We have analyzed two epochs of HST/WFPC2 observations of the young Galactic starburst cluster in NGC 3603 with the aim to study its internal dynamics and stellar population. Relative proper motions measured over 10.15 yrs of more than 800 stars enable us to distinguish cluster members from field stars. The best-fitting isochrone yields Av=4.6-4.7 mag, a distance of 6.6-6.9 kpc, and an age of 1 Myr for NGC 3603 Young Cluster (NYC). We identify pre-main-sequence/main-sequence transition stars located in the short-lived radiative-convective gap, which in the NYC occurs in the mass range 3.5-3.8 Msun. We also identify a sparse population of stars with an age of 4 Myr, which appear to be the lower mass counterparts to previously discovered blue supergiants located in the giant HII region NGC 3603. For the first time, we are able to measure the internal velocity dispersion of a starburst cluster from 234 stars with I < 18.5 mag to {\sigma}_pm1D=141+/-27 {\mu}as/yr (4.5+/-0.8 km/s at a distance of 6.75 kpc). As stars with masses between 1.7 and 9 Msun all exhibit the same velocity dispersion, the cluster stars have not yet reached equipartition of kinetic energy (i.e., the cluster is not in virial equilibrium). The results highlight the power of combining high-precision astrometry and photometry, and emphasize the role of NYC as a benchmark object for testing stellar evolution models and dynamical models for young clusters and as a template for extragalactic starburst clusters.
  • In this photometric study of the stellar association LH 95 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) we focus on the pre-main Sequence (PMS) population in order to construct, for the first time, the sub-solar initial mass function (IMF) in the LMC. We use the deepest photometry ever performed in the LMC with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on-board the Hubble Space Telescope(HST). We carry out a Monte Carlo technique to subtract the contribution of the general field of LMC and we isolate the central region in the observed area of the association. We study the mass function of its field-subtracted population. For this purpose, we introduce a new set of evolutionary models, derived from the calculations on the evolution of PMS stars by Siess et al. We use these models with our observations of LH 95 to derive the IMF of the system, which is reliably constructed down to 0.43 M_sun, the lowest mass ever observed within reasonable completeness in the Magellanic Clouds. Consequently, its construction offers an outstanding improvement in our understanding of the low-mass star formation in the LMC. The system IMF of LH 95 shows a definite change in its slope at 1 M_sun, where it becomes more shallow. In general, the shape of this IMF agrees very well with the average Galactic IMF, down to the sub-solar regime. As far as the slope of this system IMF is concerned, it is found to be somewhat more shallow than the corresponding classical Galactic IMF in the sub-solar regime, probably due to unresolved binarity, while for stars with M>1M_sun it becomes slightly steeper. We do not find significant differences in the shape of the overall IMF of LH 95 from that of each of the three individual sub-clusters, suggesting that the IMF of LH 95 is not subject to local variability.