• We report on atomic-scale visualization of the structure of infinite-layer cuprate SrCuO2 thin films grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy study reveals stoichiometric copper oxide (CuO2) plane with a 2 x 2 surface reconstruction, prompted by preferential clustering of four adjacent CuO2 plaquettes. By imaging the subsurface Sr atoms, intra-unit-cell rotational symmetry breaking is observed, which, together with the adjacent CuO2 clustering, can be well accounted for by a periodic up-down buckling of oxygen ions on the CuO2 plane. Further post-annealing leads to an incommensurate stripe structure of the surface layer. Our findings provide important structural information for deeply understanding the electronic structure of superconducting CuO2 plane as well as high temperature superconductivity in cuprates.
  • We report on the direct observation of interface superconductivity in single-unit-cell SnSe2 films grown on graphitized SiC(0001) substrate by means of van der Waals epitaxy. Tunneling spectrum in the superconducting state reveals rather conventional character with a fully gapped order parameter. The occurrence of superconductivity is further confirmed by the presence of vortices under external magnetic field. Through interface engineering, we unravel the mechanism of superconductivity that originates from a two-dimensional electron gas formed at the interface of SnSe2 and graphene. Our finding opens up novel strategies to hunt for and understand interface superconductivity based on van der Waals heterostructures.
  • A single atomic slice of {\alpha}-tin-stanene-has been predicted to host quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature, offering an ideal platform to study low-dimensional and topological physics. While recent research has intensively focused on monolayer stanene, the quantum size effect in few-layer stanene could profoundly change material properties, but remains unexplored. By exploring the layer degree of freedom, we unexpectedly discover superconductivity in few-layer stanene down to a bilayer grown on PbTe, while bulk {\alpha}-tin is not superconductive. Through substrate engineering, we further realize a transition from a single-band to a two-band superconductor with a doubling of the transition temperature. In-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) together with first-principles calculations elucidate the corresponding band structure. Interestingly, the theory also indicates the existence of a topologically nontrivial band. Our experimental findings open up novel strategies for constructing two-dimensional topological superconductors.
  • The pairing mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains the biggest unresolved mystery in condensed matter physics. To solve the problem, one of the most effective approaches is to investigate directly the superconducting CuO2 layers. Here, by growing CuO2 monolayer films on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta} substrates, we identify two distinct and spatially separated energy gaps centered at the Fermi energy, a smaller U-like gap and a larger V-like gap on the films, and study their interactions with alien atoms by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The newly discovered U-like gap exhibits strong phase coherence and is immune to scattering by K, Cs and Ag atoms, suggesting its nature as a nodeless superconducting gap in the CuO2 layers, whereas the V-like gap agrees with the well-known pseudogap state in the underdoped regime. Our results support an s-wave superconductivity in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\delta}, which, we propose, originates from the modulation-doping resultant two-dimensional hole liquid confined in the CuO2 layers.
  • We report high temperature superconductivity in one unit-cell (1-UC) FeSe films grown on STO(110) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. By in-situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurement, we observed a superconducting gap as large as 17 meV. Transport measurements on 1-UC FeSe/STO(110) capped with FeTe layers reveal superconductivity with an onset TC of 31.6 K and an upper critical magnetic field of 30.2 T. We also find that the TC can be further increased by an external electric field, but the effect is smaller than that on STO(001) substrate. The study points out the important roles of interface related charge transfer and electron-phonon coupling in the high temperature superconductivity of FeSe/STO.
  • We report the superconductivity evolution of one unit cell (1-UC) and 2-UC FeSe films on SrTiO3(001) substrates with potassium (K) adsorption. By in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurement, we find that the superconductivity in 1-UC FeSe films is continuously suppressed with increasing K coverage, whereas non-superconducting 2-UC FeSe films become superconducting with a gap of ~17 meV or ~11 meV depending on whether the underlying 1-UC films are superconducting or not. This work explicitly reveals that the interface electron-phonon coupling is strongly related to the charge transfer at FeSe/STO interface and plays vital role in enhancing Cooper pairing in both 1-UC and 2-UC FeSe films.
  • Alkali-metal (potassium) adsorption on FeSe thin films with thickness from two unit cells (UC) to 4-UC on SrTiO3 grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated with a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope. At appropriate potassium coverage (0.2-0.3 monolayer), the tunneling spectra of the films all exhibit a superconducting-like gap larger than 11 meV (five times the gap value of bulk FeSe), and two distinct features of characteristic phonon modes at 11 meV and 21 meV. The results reveal the critical role of the interface enhanced electron-phonon coupling for possible high temperature superconductivity in the system and is consistent with recent theories. Our study provides compelling evidence for the conventional pairing mechanism for this type of heterostructure superconducting systems.
  • We systematically study the coherent transport (Josephson tunneling and counterflow current) and its breakdown which leads to incoherent charge flow in in the excitonic BCS condensate formed in GaAs bilayers at $\nu_{tot}=1/2+1/2$. The Josephson currents in samples with three different interlayer distances vary by four orders of magnitude. In contrast, the breakdown thresholds for the $\nu_{tot}=1$ quantum Hall state are comparable. Furthermore, Coulomb drag in a Corbino ring reveals that the coherent counterflow current coexists with the dissipative charge transport.