• The Maxwell-Proca electrodynamics corresponding to a finite photon mass causes a substantial change of the Maxwell stress tensor and, under certain circumstances, may cause the electromagnetic stresses to act effectively as "negative pressure." The paper describes a model where this negative pressure imitates gravitational pull and may produce forces comparable to gravity and even become dominant. The effect is associated with the random magnetic fields in the galactic disk with a scale exceeding the photon Compton wavelength. The presence of a weaker regular field does not affect the forces under consideration. The stresses act predominantly on the interstellar gas and cause an additional force pulling the gas towards the center and towards the galactic plane. The stars do not experience any significant direct force but get involved in this process via a "recycling loop" where rapidly evolving massive stars are formed from the gas undergoing galactic rotation and then lose their masses back to the gas within a time shorter than roughly 1/6 of the rotation period. This makes their dynamics inseparable from that of the rotating gas. The lighter, slowly evolving stars, as soon as they are formed, lose connection to the gas and are confined within the galaxy only gravitationally. Numerical examples based on the parameters of our galaxy reveal both opportunities and challenges of this model and motivate further analysis. The critical issue is the plausibility of formation of the irregular magnetic field that would be force free. Another challenge is developing a predictive model of the evolution of the gaseous and stellar population of the galaxy under the aforementioned scenario. It may be interesting to also explore possible broader cosmological implications of the negative-pressure model.
  • Energy levels of the nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond were investigated using optically detected magnetic-resonance spectroscopy near the electronic ground-state level anticrossing (GSLAC) at an axial magnetic field around 102.4 mT in diamond samples with low (1 ppm) and high (200 ppm) nitrogen concentration. By applying microwaves in the frequency ranges from 0 to 40 MHz and from 5.6 to 5.9 GHz, we observed transitions that involve eigenstates mixed by the hyperfine interactions. We developed a theoretical model that describes the level mixing, transition energies, and transition strengths between the ground-state sublevels, including coupling to the nuclear spin of the NV center's $^{14}$N nucleus. The calculations were combined with the results from a fitting procedure that extracted information about the polarization of nuclear spin from the experimental curves using the model. These results are important for the optimization of experimental conditions in GSLAC-based applications, e.g., microwave-free magnetometry and microwave-free nuclear-magnetic-resonance probes.
  • Owing to the ac-Stark effect, the lineshape of a weak optical transition in an atomic beam can become significantly distorted, when driven by an intense standing wave field. We use an Yb atomic beam to study the lineshape of the 6s2 1S0 -> 5d6s 3D1 transition, which is excited with light circulating in a Fabry-Perot resonator. We demonstrate two methods to avoid the distortion of the transition profile. Of these, one relies on the operation of the resonator in multiple longitudinal modes, and the other in multiple transverse modes.
  • Atomic comagnetometers are used in searches for anomalous spin-dependent interactions. Magnetic field gradients are one of the major sources of systematic errors in such experiments. Here we describe a comagnetometer based on the nuclear spins within an ensemble of identical molecules. The dependence of the measured spin-precession frequency ratio on the first-order magnetic field gradient is suppressed by over an order of magnitude compared to a comagnetometer based on overlapping ensembles of different molecules. Our single-species comagnetometer is shown to be capable of measuring the hypothetical spin-dependent gravitational energy of nuclei at the $10^{-17}$ eV level, comparable to the most stringent existing constraints. Combined with techniques for enhancing the signal such as parahydrogen-induced polarization, this method of comagnetometry offers the potential to improve constraints on spin-gravity coupling of nucleons by several orders of magnitude.
  • Various fundamental-physics experiments such as measurement of the birefringence of the vacuum, searches for ultralight dark matter (e.g., axions), and precision spectroscopy of complex systems (including exotic atoms containing antimatter constituents) are enabled by high-field magnets. We give an overview of current and future experiments and discuss the state-of-the-art DC- and pulsed-magnet technologies and prospects for future developments.
  • Understanding the mechanisms behind high-$T_{c}$ Type-II superconductors (SC) is still an open task in condensed matter physics. One way to gain further insight into the microscopic mechanisms leading to superconductivity is to study the magnetic properties of the SC in detail, for example by studying the properties of vortices and their dynamics. In this work we describe a new method of wide-field imaging magnetometry using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to image vortices in an yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) thin film. We demonstrate quantitative determination of the magnetic field strength of the vortex stray field, the observation of vortex patterns for different cooling fields and direct observation of vortex pinning in our disordered YBCO film. This method opens prospects for imaging of the magnetic-stray fields of vortices at frequencies from DC to several megahertz within a wide range of temperatures which allows for the study of both high-$T_{C}$ and low-$T_{C}$ SCs. The wide temperature range allowed by NV center magnetometry also makes our approach applicable for the study of phenomena like island superconductivity at elevated temperatures (e.g. in metal nano-clusters).
  • Magnetic-field sensing has contributed to the formulation of the plate-tectonics theory, the discovery and mapping of underground structures on Earth, and the study of magnetism in other planets. Filling the gap between space-based and near-Earth observation, we demonstrate a novel method for remote measurement of the geomagnetic field at an altitude of 85-100 km. The method consists of optical pumping of atomic sodium in the upper mesosphere with an intensity-modulated laser beam, and simultaneous ground-based observation of the resultant magneto-optical resonance when driving the atomic-sodium spins at the Larmor precession frequency. The experiment was carried out at the Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in La Palma (Canary Islands) where we validated this technique and remotely measured the Larmor precession frequency of sodium as 260.4(1) kHz, corresponding to a mesospheric magnetic field of 0.3720(1) G. We demonstrate a magnetometry accuracy level of 0.28 mG/$\sqrt{\text{Hz}}$ in good atmospheric conditions. In addition, these observations allow us to characterize various atomic-collision processes in the mesosphere. Remote detection of mesospheric magnetic fields has potential applications such as mapping of large-scale magnetic structures in the lithosphere and the study of electric-current fluctuations in the ionosphere.
  • Over the last decades, the use of magnetic nanoparticles in research and commercial applications has increased dramatically. However, direct detection of trace quantities remains a challenge in terms of equipment cost, operating conditions and data acquisition times, especially in flowing conditions within complex media. Here we present the in-line, non-destructive detection of magnetic nanoparticles using high performance atomic magnetometers at ambient conditions in flowing media. We achieve sub-picomolar sensitivities measuring $\sim$30 nm ferromagnetic iron and cobalt nanoparticles that are suitable for biomedical and industrial applications, under flowing conditions in water and whole blood. Additionally, we demonstrate real-time surveillance of the magnetic separation of nanoparticles from water and whole blood. Overall our system has the merit of inline direct measurement of trace quantities of ferromagnetic nanoparticles with so far unreached sensitivities and could be applied in the biomedical field (diagnostics and therapeutics) but also in the industrial sector.
  • Heretofore undiscovered spin-0 or spin-1 bosons can mediate exotic spin-dependent interactions between standard-model particles. Here we carry out the first search for semileptonic spin-dependent interactions between matter and antimatter. We compare theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements of the hyperfine structure of antiprotonic helium to constrain exotic spin- and velocity-dependent interactions between electrons and antiprotons.
  • The weak interaction does not conserve parity, which is apparent in many nuclear and atomic phenomena. However, thus far, parity nonconservation has not been observed in molecules. Here we consider nuclear-spin-dependent parity nonconserving contributions to the molecular Hamiltonian. These contributions give rise to a parity nonconserving indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling which can be distinguished from parity conserving interactions in molecules of appropriate symmetry, including diatomic molecules. We estimate the magnitude of the coupling, taking into account relativistic corrections. Finally, we propose and simulate an experiment to detect the parity nonconserving coupling using liquid-state zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance of electrically oriented molecules and show that $^{1}$H$^{19}$F should give signals within the detection limits of current atomic vapor-cell magnetometers.
  • The Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment (CASPEr) is a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment (NMR) seeking to detect axion and axion-like particles which could make up the dark matter present in the universe. We review the predicted couplings of axions and axion-like particles with baryonic matter that enable their detection via NMR. We then describe two measurement schemes being implemented in CASPEr. The first method, presented in the original CASPEr proposal, consists of a resonant search via continuous-wave NMR spectroscopy. This method offers the highest sensitivity for frequencies ranging from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz, corresponding to masses $ m_{\rm a} \sim 10^{-14}$--$10^{-6}$ eV. Sub-Hz frequencies are typically difficult to probe with NMR due to the diminishing sensitivity of magnetometers in this region. To circumvent this limitation, we suggest new detection and data processing modalities. We describe a non-resonant frequency-modulation detection scheme, enabling searches from mHz to Hz frequencies ($m_{\rm a} \sim 10^{-17}$--$10^{-14} $ eV), extending the detection bandwidth by three decades.
  • The Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment (CASPEr) seeks to measure oscillating torques on nuclear spins caused by axion or axion-like-particle (ALP) dark matter via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. A sample spin-polarized along a leading magnetic field experiences a resonance when the Larmor frequency matches the axion/ALP Compton frequency, generating precessing transverse nuclear magnetization. Here we demonstrate a Spin-Exchange Relaxation-Free (SERF) magnetometer with sensitivity $\approx 1~{\rm fT/\sqrt{Hz}}$ and an effective sensing volume of 0.1 $\rm{cm^3}$ that may be useful for NMR detection in CASPEr. A potential drawback of SERF-magnetometer-based NMR detection is the SERF's limited dynamic range. Use of a magnetic flux transformer to suppress the leading magnetic field is considered as a potential method to expand the SERF's dynamic range in order to probe higher axion/ALP Compton frequencies.
  • Dynamic hybrid optical pumping effects with a radio-frequency-field-driven nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (RF NMOR) scheme are studied in a dual-species paraffin coated vapor cell. By pumping K atoms and probing $^{87}$Rb atoms, we achieve an intrinsic magnetic resonance linewidth of 3 Hz and the observed resonance is immune to power broadening and light-shift effects. Such operation scheme shows favorable prospects for atomic magnetometry applications.
  • Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides complementary analysis modalities to those of high-field NMR and allows for ultra-high-resolution spectroscopy and measurement of untruncated spin-spin interactions. Unlike for the high-field case, however, universal quantum control -- the ability to perform arbitrary unitary operations -- has not been experimentally demonstrated in zero-field NMR. This is because the Larmor frequency for all spins is identically zero at zero field, making it challenging to individually address different spin species. We realize a composite-pulse technique for arbitrary independent rotations of $^1$H and $^{13}$C spins in a two-spin system. Quantum-information-inspired randomized benchmarking and state tomography are used to evaluate the quality of the control. We experimentally demonstrate single-spin control for $^{13}$C with an average gate fidelity of $0.9960(2)$ and two-spin control via a controlled-not (CNOT) gate with an estimated fidelity of $0.99$. The combination of arbitrary single-spin gates and a CNOT gate is sufficient for universal quantum control of the nuclear spin system. The realization of complete spin control in zero-field NMR is an essential step towards applications to quantum simulation, entangled-state-assisted quantum metrology, and zero-field NMR spectroscopy.
  • The weak interaction does not conserve parity and therefore induces energy shifts in chiral enantiomers that should in principle be detectable in molecular spectra. Unfortunately, the magnitude of the expected shifts are small and in spectra of a mixture of enantiomers, the energy shifts are not resolvable. We propose a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment in which we titrate the chirality (enantiomeric excess) of a solvent and measure the diasteriomeric splitting in the spectra of a chiral solute in order to search for an anomalous offset due to parity nonconservation (PNC). We present a proof-of-principle experiment in which we search for PNC in the \textsuperscript{13}C resonances of small molecules, and use the \textsuperscript{1}H resonances, which are insensitive to PNC, as an internal reference. We set a new constraint on molecular PNC in \textsuperscript{13}C chemical shifts at a level of $10^{-5}$\,ppm, and provide a discussion of important considerations in the search for molecular PNC using NMR spectroscopy.
  • The nonlinear Zeeman effect can induce splitting and asymmetries of magnetic-resonance lines in the geophysical magnetic field range. This is a major source of "heading error" for scalar atomic magnetometers. We demonstrate a method to suppress the nonlinear Zeeman effect and heading error based on spin locking. In an all-optical synchronously pumped magnetometer with separate pump and probe beams, we apply a radio-frequency field which is in-phase with the precessing magnetization. In an earth-range field, a multi-component asymmetric magnetic-resonance line with ? 60 Hz width collapses into a single peak with a width of 22 Hz, whose position is largely independent of the orientation of the sensor. The technique is expected to be broadly applicable in practical magnetometry, potentially boosting the sensitivity and accuracy of earth-surveying magnetometers by increasing the magnetic resonance amplitude, decreasing its width and removing the important and limiting heading-error systematic.
  • We review instrumentation for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in zero and ultra-low magnetic field (ZULF, below 0.1 $\mu$T) where detection is based on a low-cost, non-cryogenic, spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) $^{87}$Rb atomic magnetometer. The typical sensitivity is 20-30 fT/Hz$^{1/2}$ for signal frequencies below 1 kHz and NMR linewidths range from Hz all the way down to tens of mHz. These features enable precision measurements of chemically informative nuclear spin-spin couplings as well as nuclear spin precession in ultra-low magnetic fields.
  • We present experimental results demonstrating controllable dispersion in a ring laser by monitoring the lasing-frequency response to cavity-length variations. Pumping on an N-type level configuration in ${}^{87}$Rb, we tailor the intra-cavity dispersion slope by varying experimental parameters such as pump-laser frequency, atomic density, and pump power. As a result, we can tune the pulling factor (PF), i.e. the ratio of the laser frequency shift to the empty cavity frequency shift, of our laser by more than an order of magnitude.
  • In this Letter we explore the potential of probing new light force-carriers, with spin-independent couplings to the electron and the neutron, using precision isotope shift spectroscopy. We develop a formalism to interpret linear King plots as bounds on new physics with minimal theory inputs. We focus only on bounding the new physics contributions that can be calculated independently of the Standard Model nuclear effects. We apply our method to existing Ca+ data and project its sensitivity to possibly existing new bosons using narrow transitions in other atoms and ions (specifically, Sr and Yb). Future measurements are expected to improve the relative precision by five orders of magnitude, and can potentially lead to an unprecedented sensitivity for bosons within the 10 keV to 10 MeV mass range.
  • We demonstrate how the orientation of the Rb cell can significantly affect the intensity and spectral characteristics of both the frequency up- and down-converted fields generated by nonlinear processes in Rb vapour. The efficiency of parametric wave mixing in Rb vapour excited to the 5D5/2 level by two-colour resonant laser light can be significantly increased by seeding the excitation region with coherent and directional radiation at 5.23 um that is resonant with the population inverted 5D5/2-6P3/2 transition. It has been shown that the process of velocity insensitive two-photon excitation is central to understanding the observed coherent blue and mid-IR light enhancements and that the velocity insensitive and velocity selective two-photon excitations could produce two co-existing but spectrally and spatially distinguishable mid-IR fields at 5.23 um.
  • Agreement between theoretical calculations of atomic structure and spectroscopic measurements is used to constrain possible contribution of exotic spin-dependent interactions between electrons to the energy differences between states in helium-4. In particular, constraints on dipole-dipole interactions associated with the exchange of pseudoscalar bosons (such as axions or axion-like particles, ALPs) with masses $10^{-2}~{\rm eV} \lesssim m \lesssim 10^{4}~{\rm eV}$ are improved by a factor of $\sim 100$. The first atomic-scale constraints on several exotic velocity-dependent dipole-dipole interactions are established as well.
  • We present a method which allows for the extraction of physical quantities directly from zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) data. A numerical density matrix evolution is used to simulate ZULF NMR spectra of several molecules in order to fit experimental data. The method is utilized to determine the indirect spin-spin couplings ($J$-couplings) in these, which is achieved with precision of $10^{-2}$--$10^{-4}$ Hz. The simulated and measured spectra are compared to earlier research. Agreement and precision improvement for most of the $J$-coupling estimates are achieved. The availability of an efficient, flexible fitting method for ZULF NMR enables a new generation of precision-measurement experiments for spin-dependent interactions and physics beyond the Standard Model.
  • Recent developments in magnetic field sensing with negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centers (NV) in diamond employ magnetic-field (MF) dependent features in the photoluminescence (PL) and eliminate the need for microwaves (MW). Here, we study two approaches towards improving the magnetometric sensitivity using the ground-state level anti-crossing (GSLAC) feature of the NV center at a background MF of 102.4\,mT. Following the first approach, we investigate the feature parameters for precise alignment in a dilute diamond sample; the second approach extends the sensing protocol into absorption via detection of the GSLAC in the diamond transmission of a 1042\,nm laser beam. This leads to an increase of GSLAC contrast and results in a magnetometer with a sensitivity of 0.45\,nT/$\sqrt{\text{Hz}}$ and a photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 12.2 pT/$\sqrt{\rm{Hz}}$.
  • We propose methods of optical pumping that are applicable to open, high-angular-momentum transitions in atoms and molecules, for which conventional optical pumping would lead to significant population loss. Instead of applying circularly polarized cw light, as in conventional optical pumping, we propose to use techniques for coherent population transfer (e.g., adiabatic fast passage) to arrange the atoms so as to increase the entropy removed from the system with each spontaneous decay from the upper state. This minimizes the number of spontaneous-emission events required to produce a stretched state, thus reducing the population loss due to decay to other states. To produce a stretched state in a manifold with angular momentum J, conventional optical pumping requires about 2J spontaneous decays per atom, one of our proposed methods reduces this to about log_2(2J), while another of the methods reduces it to about one spontaneous decay, independent of J.
  • Radio-frequency (rf) Paul traps operated with multifrequency rf trapping potentials provide the ability to independently confine charged particle species with widely different charge-to-mass ratios. In particular, these traps may find use in the field of antihydrogen recombination, allowing antiproton and positron clouds to be trapped and confined in the same volume without the use of large superconducting magnets. We explore the stability regions of two-frequency Paul traps and perform numerical simulations of small, multispecies charged-particle mixtures that indicate the promise of these traps for antihydrogen recombination.