• Time-reversal symmetry suppresses electron backscattering in a quantum-spin-Hall edge, yielding quantized conductance at zero temperature. Understanding the dominant corrections in finite-temperature experiments remains an unsettled issue. We study a novel mechanism for conductance suppression: backscattering caused by incoherent electromagnetic noise. Specifically, we show that an electric potential fluctuating randomly in time can backscatter electrons inelastically without constraints faced by electron-electron interactions. We quantify noise-induced corrections to the dc conductance in various regimes and propose an experiment to test this scenario.
  • Weyl fermions in an external magnetic field exhibit the chiral anomaly, a non-conservation of chiral fermions. In a Weyl semimetal, a spatially inhomogeneous Weyl node separation causes similar effect by creating an intrinsic pseudo-magnetic field with an opposite sign for nodes of opposite chirality. In the present work we study the interplay of external and intrinsic fields. In particular, we focus on quantum oscillations due to bulk-boundary trajectories. When caused by an external field, such oscillations are a proven experimental technique to detect Weyl semimetals. We show that the intrinsic field leaves hallmarks on such oscillations by decreasing the period of the oscillations in an analytically traceable manner. The oscillations can thus be used to test the effect of an intrinsic field and to extract its strength.
  • Quantum computation by non-Abelian Majorana zero modes (MZMs) offers an approach to achieve fault tolerance by encoding quantum information in the non-local charge parity states of semiconductor nanowire networks in the topological superconductor regime. Thus far, experimental studies of MZMs chiefly relied on single electron tunneling measurements which leads to decoherence of the quantum information stored in the MZM. As a next step towards topological quantum computation, charge parity conserving experiments based on the Josephson effect are required, which can also help exclude suggested non-topological origins of the zero bias conductance anomaly. Here we report the direct measurement of the Josephson radiation frequency in InAs nanowires with epitaxial aluminium shells. For the first time, we observe the $4\pi$-periodic Josephson effect above a magnetic field of $\approx 200\,$mT, consistent with the estimated and measured topological phase transition of similar devices.
  • We show that burying of the Dirac point in semiconductor-based quantum-spin-Hall systems can generate unexpected robustness of edge states to magnetic fields. A detailed ${\bf k\cdot p}$ band-structure analysis reveals that InAs/GaSb and HgTe/CdTe quantum wells exhibit such buried Dirac points. By simulating transport in a disordered system described within an effective model, we further demonstrate that buried Dirac points yield nearly quantized edge conduction out to large magnetic fields, consistent with recent experiments.
  • Junctions created by coupling two superconductors via a semiconductor nanowire in the presence of high magnetic fields are the basis for detection, fusion, and braiding of Majorana bound states. We study NbTiN/InSb nanowire/NbTiN Josephson junctions and find that their critical currents in the few mode regime are strongly suppressed by magnetic field. Furthermore, the dependence of the critical current on magnetic field exhibits gate-tunable nodes. Based on a realistic numerical model we conclude that the Zeeman effect induced by the magnetic field and the spin-orbit interaction in the nanowire are insufficient to explain the observed evolution of the Josephson effect. We find the interference between the few occupied one-dimensional modes in the nanowire to be the dominant mechanism responsible for the critical current behavior. The suppression and non-monotonic evolution of critical currents at finite magnetic field should be taken into account when designing circuits based on Majorana bound states.
  • We discuss the signatures of a Kramers pair of Majorana modes formed in a Josephson junction on top of a quantum spin Hall system. We show that, while ignoring interactions on the quantum spin Hall edge allows arbitrary Andreev process in the system, moderate repulsive interactions stabilize Andreev transmission - the hole goes into the opposite lead from where the electron has arrived. We analyze the renormalization group equations and deduce the existence of a non-trivial critical point for sufficiently strong interactions.
  • Motivated by the recent advances in studying Majorana states in nanowires under conditions of superconducting proximity effect, we address the correspondence between the common topological transition in infinite system and the topological transition of other type that manifests itself in the positions of the poles of the scattering matrices. We establish a universal dependence of the pole positions in the vicinity of the common transition on the parameter controlling the transition, and discuss the manifestations of the pole transitions in the differential conductance.