• Cosmic rays passing through large astrospheres can be efficiently cooled inside these "cavities" in the interstellar medium. Moreover, the energy spectra of these energetic particles are already modulated in front of the astrospherical bow shocks. We study the cosmic ray flux in and around lambda Cephei as an example for an astrosphere. The large-scale plasma flow is modeled hydrodynamically with radiative cooling. We studied the cosmic ray flux in a stellar wind cavity using a transport model based on stochastic differential equations. The required parameters, most importantly, the elements of the diffusion tensor, are based on the heliospheric parameters. The magnetic field required for the diffusion coefficients is calculated kinematically. We discuss the transport in an astrospheric scenario with varying parameters for the transport coefficients. We show that large stellar wind cavities can act as sinks for the galactic cosmic ray flux and thus can give rise to small-scale anisotropies in the direction to the observer. Small-scale cosmic ray anisotropies can naturally be explained by the modulation of cosmic ray spectra in huge stellar wind cavities.
  • Magnetic fields are an important ingredient of the interstellar medium (ISM). Besides their importance for star formation, they govern the transport of cosmic rays, relevant to the launch and regulation of galactic outflows and winds, which in turn are pivotal in shaping the structure of halo magnetic fields. Mapping the small-scale structure of interstellar magnetic fields in many nearby galaxies is crucial to understand the interaction between gas and magnetic fields, in particular how gas flows are affected. Elucidation of the magnetic role in, e.g., triggering star formation, forming and stabilising spiral arms, driving outflows, gas heating by reconnection and magnetising the intergalactic medium has the potential to revolutionise our physical picture of the ISM and galaxy evolution in general. Radio polarisation observations in the very nearest galaxies at high frequencies (>= 3 GHz) and with high spatial resolution (<= 5") hold the key here. The galaxy survey with SKA1 that we propose will also be a major step to understand the galactic dynamo, which is important for models of galaxy evolution and for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics in general. Field amplification by turbulent gas motions, which is crucial for efficient dynamo action, has been investigated so far only in simulations, while compelling evidence of turbulent fields from observations is still lacking.
  • The SKA will be a state of the art radiotelescope optimized for both large area surveys as well as for deep pointed observations. In this paper we analyze the impact that the SKA will have on Galactic studies, starting from the immense legacy value of the all-sky survey proposed by the continuum SWG but also presenting some areas of Galactic Science that particularly benefit from SKA observations both surveys and pointed. The planned all-sky survey will be characterized by unique spatial resolution, sensitivity and survey speed, providing us with a wide-field atlas of the Galactic continuum emission. Synergies with existing, current and planned radio Galactic Plane surveys will be discussed. SKA will give the opportunity to create a sensitive catalog of discrete Galactic radio sources, most of them representing the interaction of stars at various stages of their evolution with the environment: complete census of all stage of HII regions evolution; complete census of late stages of stellar evolution such as PNe and SNRs; detection of stellar winds, thermal jets, Symbiotic systems, Chemically Peculiar and dMe stars, active binary systems in both flaring and quiescent states. Coherent emission events like Cyclotron Maser in the magnetospheres of different classes of stars can be detected. Pointed, deep observations will allow new insights into the physics of the coronae and plasma processes in active stellar systems and single stars, enabling the detection of flaring activity in larger stellar population for a better comprehension of the mechanism of energy release in the atmospheres of stars with different masses and age.
  • We investigate the cosmic ray driven dynamo in the interstellar medium of irregular galaxy. The observations (Chyzy et al. 2000, 2003) show that the magnetic field in irregular galaxies is present and its value reaches the same level as in spiral galaxies. However the conditions in the medium of irregular galaxy are very unfavorable for amplification the magnetic field due to slow rotation and low shearing rate. In this work we present numerical model of the interstellar medium in irregular galaxies. The model includes magnetohydrodynamical dynamo driven by cosmic rays in the interstellar medium provided by random supernova explosions. We describe models characterized by different shear and rotation. We find that even slow galactic rotation with low shearing rate gives amplification of the magnetic field. Simulations have shown that high amount of the magnetic energy flow out off the simulation region becoming an efficient source of intergalactic magnetic fields.
  • We observed 5 Hickson Compact Groups with the ESO/MPI 2.2m telescope and WFI to investigate the dwarf galaxy content and distribution in these galaxy groups. Our deep imaging and careful selection of the candidate galaxies revealed a rich population of mainly passively evolving dwarf galaxies, which is spatially much more extended than the originally defined Hickson Compact groups. The composite luminosity function of the 5 groups shows a bimodal structure with a very steep rise in the low luminosity regime. The faint end slope is close to the predictions of CDM theory for the slope of the Dark Matter halo mass function.