• This document presents (off-line) computing requrements and challenges for Cosmic Frontier science, covering the areas of data management, analysis, and simulations. We invite contributions to extend the range of covered topics and to enhance the current descriptions.
  • We study the gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae through the detonation phase and into homologous expansion. In the GCD model, a detonation is triggered by the surface flow due to single point, off-center flame ignition in carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. The simulations are unique in terms of the degree to which non-idealized physics is used to treat the reactive flow, including weak reaction rates and a time dependent treatment of material in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE). Careful attention is paid to accurately calculating the final composition of material which is burned to NSE and frozen out in the rapid expansion following the passage of a detonation wave over the high density core of the white dwarf; and an efficient method for nucleosynthesis post-processing is developed which obviates the need for costly network calculations along tracer particle thermodynamic trajectories. Observational diagnostics are presented for the explosion models, including abundance stratifications and integrated yields. We find that for all of the ignition conditions studied here, a self regulating process comprised of neutronization and stellar expansion results in final \iso{Ni}{56} masses of $\sim$1.1\msun. But, more energetic models result in larger total NSE and stable Fe peak yields. The total yield of intermediate mass elements is $\sim0.1$\msun and the explosion energies are all around 1.5$\times10^{51}$ ergs. The explosion models are briefly compared to the inferred properties of recent Type Ia supernova observations. The potential for surface detonation models to produce lower luminosity (lower \iso{Ni}{56} mass) supernovae is discussed.
  • We identify new structures in the halo of the Milky Way Galaxy from positions, colors and magnitudes of five million stars detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Most of these stars are within 1.26 degrees of the celestial equator. We present color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for stars in two previously discovered, tidally disrupted structures. The CMDs and turnoff colors are consistent with those of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, as had been predicted. In one direction, we are even able to detect a clump of red stars, similar to that of the Sagittarius dwarf, from stars spread across 110 square degrees of sky. Focusing on stars with the colors of F turnoff objects, we identify at least five additional overdensities of stars. Four of these may be pieces of the same halo structure, which would cover a region of the sky at least 40 degrees in diameter, at a distance of 11 kpc from the Sun (18 kpc from the center of the Galaxy). The turnoff is significantly bluer than that of thick disk stars, and closer to the Galactic plane than a power-law spheroid. We suggest two models to explain this new structure. One possibility is that this new structure could be a new dwarf satellite of the Milky Way, hidden in the Galactic plane, and in the process of being tidally disrupted. The other possibility is that it could be part of a disk-like distribution of stars which is metal-poor, with a scale height of approximately 2 kpc and a scale length of approximately 10 kpc. The fifth overdensity, which is 20 kpc away, is some distance from the Sagittarius dwarf streamer orbit and is not associated with any known structure in the Galactic plane. It is likely that there are many smaller streams of stars in the Galactic halo.
  • The discovery of an optical counterpart to GRB010222 (detected by BeppoSAX; Piro 2001) was announced 4.4 hrs after the burst by Henden (2001a). The Sloan Digital Sky Survey's 0.5m photometric telescope (PT) and 2.5m survey telescope were used to observe the afterglow of GRB010222 starting 4.8 hours after the GRB. The 0.5m PT observed the afterglow in five, 300 sec g' band exposures over the course of half an hour, measuring a temporal decay rate in this short period of F_nu \propto t^{-1.0+/-0.5}. The 2.5m camera imaged the counterpart nearly simultaneously in five filters (u' g' r' i' z'), with r' = 18.74+/-0.02 at 12:10 UT. These multicolor observations, corrected for reddening and the afterglow's temporal decay, are well fit by the power-law F_nu \propto nu^{-0.90+/-0.03} with the exception of the u' band UV flux which is 20% below this slope. We examine possible interpretations of this spectral shape, including source extinction in a star forming region.