• We use near-IR grism spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope to examine the strength of [Ne~III] 3869 relative to H-beta, [O~II] 3727 and [O~III] 5007 in 236 low mass (7.5 < log (Mstar/Msolar) < 10.5) star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. By stacking the data by stellar mass, we show that the [Ne~III]/[O~II] ratios of the z ~ 2 universe are marginally higher than those seen in a comparable set of local SDSS galaxies, and that [Ne~III]/[O~III] is enhanced by ~0.2 dex. We consider the possible explanations for this ~4-sigma result, including higher oxygen depletion out of the gas-phase, denser H~II regions, higher production of Ne22 via Wolf-Rayet stars, and the existence of a larger population of X-ray obscured AGN at z ~ 2 compared to z ~ 0. None of these simple scenarios, alone, are favored to explain the observed line ratios. We conclude by suggesting several avenues of future observations to further explore the mystery of enhanced [Ne~III] emission.
  • We measure the acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Data Release 8 imaging catalog that includes 872,921 galaxies over ~ 10,000 deg^2 between 0.45<z<0.65. The extensive spectroscopic training set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) luminous galaxies allows precise estimates of the true redshift distributions of galaxies in our imaging catalog. Utilizing the redshift distribution information, we build templates and fit to the power spectra of the data, which are measured in our companion paper, Ho et al. 2011, to derive the location of Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) while marginalizing over many free parameters to exclude nearly all of the non-BAO signal. We derive the ratio of the angular diameter distance to the sound horizon scale D_A/r_s= 9.212 + 0.416 -0.404 at z=0.54, and therefore, D_A= 1411+- 65 Mpc at z=0.54; the result is fairly independent of assumptions on the underlying cosmology. Our measurement of angular diameter distance D_A is 1.4 \sigma higher than what is expected for the concordance LCDM (Komatsu et al. 2011), in accordance to the trend of other spectroscopic BAO measurements for z >~ 0.35. We report constraints on cosmological parameters from our measurement in combination with the WMAP7 data and the previous spectroscopic BAO measurements of SDSS (Percival et al. 2010) and WiggleZ (Blake et al. 2011). We refer to our companion papers (Ho et al. 2011; de Putter et al. 2011) for investigations on information of the full power spectrum.
  • We analyze the three-year SDSS-II Superernova (SN) Survey data and identify a sample of 1070 photometric SN Ia candidates based on their multi-band light curve data. This sample consists of SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, with a subset of 210 candidates having spectroscopic redshifts of their host galaxies measured, while the remaining 860 candidates are purely photometric in their identification. We describe a method for estimating the efficiency and purity of photometric SN Ia classification when spectroscopic confirmation of only a limited sample is available, and demonstrate that SN Ia candidates from SDSS-II can be identified photometrically with ~91% efficiency and with a contamination of ~6%. Although this is the largest uniform sample of SN candidates to date for studying photometric identification, we find that a larger spectroscopic sample of contaminating sources is required to obtain a better characterization of the background events. A Hubble diagram using SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, but with host galaxy spectroscopic redshifts, yields a distance modulus dispersion that is only ~20 - 40% larger than that of the spectroscopically-confirmed SN Ia sample alone with no significant bias. A Hubble diagram with purely photometric classification and redshift-distance measurements, however, exhibit biases that require further investigation for precision cosmology.
  • Supernova rates are directly coupled to high mass stellar birth and evolution. As such, they are one of the few direct measures of the history of cosmic stellar evolution. In this paper we describe an probabilistic technique for identifying supernovae within spectroscopic samples of galaxies. We present a study of 52 type Ia supernovae ranging in age from -14 days to +40 days extracted from a parent sample of \simeq 50,000 spectra from the SDSS DR5. We find a Supernova Rate (SNR) of 0.472^{+0.048}_{-0.039}(Systematic)^{+0.081}_{-0.071}(Statistical)SNu at a redshift of <z> = 0.1. This value is higher than other values at low redshift at the 1{\sigma}, but is consistent at the 3{\sigma} level. The 52 supernova candidates used in this study comprise the third largest sample of supernovae used in a type Ia rate determination to date. In this paper we demonstrate the potential for the described approach for detecting supernovae in future spectroscopic surveys.
  • We present a catalog of over 130,000 quasars candidates with NIR photometric properties, with an areal coverage of approximately 1,200 deg^2. This is achieved by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in the optical ugriz bands, to the UKIRT Infrared Digital Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) in the near-infrared YJHK bands. We match the ~1 million SDSS DR6 Photometric Quasar catalog to Data Release 3 of the UKIDSS LAS (ULAS), and produce a catalog with 130,827 objects with detections in one or more NIR bands, of which 74,351 objects have optical and K-band detections and 42,133 objects have the full 9-band photometry. The majority ~85 of the SDSS objects were not matched simply because there were not covered by the ULAS. Our matched catalog has a surface density of ~53 deg^-2 for K >18.27 objects; tests using our matched catalog, along with data from the UKIDSS DXS, implies that our limiting magnitude is i ~ 20.6. Color-redshift diagrams, for the optical and NIR, show the close agreement between our matched catalog and recent quasar color models at redshift z > 2.0, while at higher redshifts, the models generally appear to be bluer than the mean observed quasar colors. The gJK and giK color-spaces are used to examine methods of differentiating between stars and (mid-redshift) quasars, key to currently ongoing quasar surveys. Finally, we report on the NIR photometric properties of high, z>4.6, and very high, z>5.7, redshift previously discovered quasars.
  • We use UV/optical and X-ray observations of 272 radio-quiet Type 1 AGNs and quasars to investigate the CIV Baldwin Effect (BEff). The UV/optical spectra are drawn from the Hubble Space Telescope, International Ultraviolet Explorer and Sloan Digital Sky Survey archives. The X-ray spectra are from the Chandra and XMM-Newton archives. We apply correlation and partial-correlation analyses to the equivalent widths, continuum monochromatic luminosities, and alpha_ox, which characterizes the relative X-ray to UV brightness. The equivalent width of the CIV 1549 emission line is correlated with both alpha_ox and luminosity. We find that by regressing l_UV with EW(CIV) and alpha_ox, we can obtain tighter correlations than by regressing l_UV with only EW(CIV). Both correlation and regression analyses imply that l_UV is not the only factor controlling the changes of EW(CIV); alpha_ox (or, equivalently, the soft X-ray emission) plays a fundamental role in the formation and variation of CIV. Variability contributes at least 60% of the scatter of the EW(CIV)-l_UV relation and at least 75% of the scatter of the of the EW(CIV)-alpha_ox relation. In our sample, narrow Fe Kalpha 6.4 keV emission lines are detected in 50 objects. Although narrow Fe Kalpha exhibits a BEff similar to that of CIV, its equivalent width has almost no dependence on either alpha_ox or EW(CIV). This suggests that the majority of narrow Fe Kalpha emission is unlikely to be produced in the broad emission-line region. We do find suggestive correlations between the emission-line luminosities of CIV and Fe Kalpha, which could be potentially used to estimate the detectability of the Fe Kalpha line of quasars from rest-frame UV spectroscopic observations.
  • Abridged: We estimate the distances to ~48 million stars detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and map their 3D number density distribution in 100 < D < 20 kpc range over 6,500 deg^2 of sky. The data show strong evidence for a Galaxy consisting of an oblate halo, a disk component, and a number of localized overdensities with exponential disk parameters (bias-corrected for an assumed 35% binary fraction) H_1 = 300 pc, L_1 = 2600 pc, H_2 = 900 pc, L_2 = 3600 pc, and local density normalization of 12%. We find the halo to be oblate, with best-fit axis ratio c/a = 0.64, r^{-2.8} profile, and the local halo-to-thin disk normalization of 0.5%. We estimate the errors of derived model parameters to be no larger than ~20% (disk scales) and ~10% (thick disk normalization). While generally consistent with the above model, the density distribution shows a number of statistically significant localized deviations. We detect two overdensities in the thick disk region at (R, Z) ~ (6.5, 1.5)kpc and (R, Z) ~ (9.5, 0.8) kpc, and a remarkable density enhancement in the halo covering >1000deg^2 of sky towards the constellation of Virgo, at distances of ~6-20 kpc. Compared to a region symmetric with respect to the l=0 line, the Virgo overdensity is responsible for a factor of 2 number density excess and may be a nearby tidal stream or a low-surface brightness dwarf galaxy merging with the Milky Way. After removal of the resolved overdensities, the remaining data are consistent with a smooth density distribution; we detect no evidence of further unresolved clumpy substructure at scales ranging from ~50pc in the disk, to ~1 - 2 kpc in the halo.
  • We present the "C4 Cluster Catalog", a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster--finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects which plagued previous optical clusters selection. The present C4 catalog covers ~2600 square degrees of sky with groups containing 10 members to massive clusters having over 200 cluster members with redshifts. We provide cluster properties like sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r--band optical luminosity (L_r), velocity dispersion, and measures of substructure. We use new mock galaxy catalogs to investigate the sensitivity to the various algorithm parameters, as well as to quantify purity and completeness. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is ~90% complete and 95% pure above M_200 = 1x10^14 solar masses and within 0.03 <=z <= 0.12. The C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 <= z <= 0.12. We show that the L_r of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M_200) than the line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster. L_r. The final SDSS data will provide ~2500 C4 clusters and will represent one of the largest and most homogeneous samples of local clusters.
  • We examine the properties of the host galaxies of 22,623 narrow-line AGN with 0.02<z<0.3 selected from a complete sample of 122,808 galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We focus on the luminosity of the [OIII]$\lambda$5007 emission line as a tracer of the strength of activity in the nucleus. We study how AGN host properties compare to those of normal galaxies and how they depend on L[OIII]. We find that AGN of all luminosities reside almost exclusively in massive galaxies and have distributions of sizes, stellar surface mass densities and concentrations that are similar to those of ordinary early-type galaxies in our sample. The host galaxies of low-luminosity AGN have stellar populations similar to normal early-types. The hosts of high- luminosity AGN have much younger mean stellar ages. The young stars are not preferentially located near the nucleus of the galaxy, but are spread out over scales of at least several kiloparsecs. A significant fraction of high- luminosity AGN have strong H$\delta$ absorption-line equivalent widths, indicating that they experienced a burst of star formation in the recent past. We have also examined the stellar populations of the host galaxies of a sample of broad-line AGN. We conclude that there is no significant difference in stellar content between type 2 Seyfert hosts and QSOs with the same [OIII] luminosity and redshift. This establishes that a young stellar population is a general property of AGN with high [OIII] luminosities.
  • The discovery of an optical counterpart to GRB010222 (detected by BeppoSAX; Piro 2001) was announced 4.4 hrs after the burst by Henden (2001a). The Sloan Digital Sky Survey's 0.5m photometric telescope (PT) and 2.5m survey telescope were used to observe the afterglow of GRB010222 starting 4.8 hours after the GRB. The 0.5m PT observed the afterglow in five, 300 sec g' band exposures over the course of half an hour, measuring a temporal decay rate in this short period of F_nu \propto t^{-1.0+/-0.5}. The 2.5m camera imaged the counterpart nearly simultaneously in five filters (u' g' r' i' z'), with r' = 18.74+/-0.02 at 12:10 UT. These multicolor observations, corrected for reddening and the afterglow's temporal decay, are well fit by the power-law F_nu \propto nu^{-0.90+/-0.03} with the exception of the u' band UV flux which is 20% below this slope. We examine possible interpretations of this spectral shape, including source extinction in a star forming region.