• Broad absorption lines (BALs) found in a significant fraction of quasar spectra identify high-velocity outflows that might be present in all quasars and could be a major factor in feedback to galaxy evolution. Understanding the nature of these flows requires further constraints on their physical properties, including their column densities, for which well-studied BALs, such as CIV 1548,1551, typically provide only a lower limit because of saturation effects. Low-abundance lines, such as PV 1118,1128, indicate large column densities, implying outflows more powerful than measurements of CIV alone would indicate. We search through a sample of 2694 BAL quasars from the SDSS-III/BOSS DR9 quasar catalog for such absorption, and we identify 81 `definite' and 86 `probable' detections of PV broad absorption, yielding a firm lower limit of 3.0-6.2% for the incidence of such absorption among BAL quasars. The PV-detected quasars tend to have stronger CIV and SiIV absorption, as well as a higher incidence of LoBAL absorption, than the overall BAL quasar population. Many of the PV-detected quasars have CIV troughs that do not reach zero intensity (at velocities where PV is detected), confirming that the outflow gas only partially covers the UV continuum source. PV appears significantly in a composite spectrum of non-PV-detected BAL quasars, indicating that PV absorption (and large column densities) are much more common than indicated by our search results. Our sample of PV detections significantly increases the number of known PV detections, providing opportunities for follow-up studies to better understand BAL outflow energetics.
  • We present JHK near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 25 candidate Type II quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, using Triplespec on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m telescope, FIRE at the Magellan/Baade 6.5m telescope, and GNIRS on Gemini. At redshifts of 2 < z < 3.4, our NIR spectra probe the rest-frame optical region of these targets, which were initially selected to have strong lines of CIV and Ly alpha, with FWHM<2000 km/s from the SDSS pipeline. We use the [OIII]5007 line shape as a model for the narrow line region emission, and find that \halpha\ consistently requires a broad component with FWHMs ranging from 1000 to 7500 km/s. Interestingly, the CIV lines also require broad bases, but with considerably narrower widths of 1000 to 4500 km/s. Estimating the extinction using the Balmer decrement and also the relationship in lower-z quasars between rest equivalent width and luminosity in the [OIII] line, we find typical A_V values of 0-2 mag, which naturally explain the attenuated CIV lines relative to Halpha. We propose that our targets are moderately obscured quasars. We also describe one unusual object with three distinct velocity peaks in its [OIII] spectrum.
  • We present HST-COS spectra of ten quasars located behind M31, selected to investigate the properties of gas associated with its extended disk and high velocity clouds (HVCs). The sightlines have impact parameters ranging between b= 13 kpc and 112 kpc. No absorption is detected in the four sightlines beyond b=57 kpc. Of the six remaining sightlines, all of which lie at b<32 kpc and within the N(HI)= 2E18 cm^{-2} boundary of the HI disk of M31, we detect low-ionization absorption at M31 velocities along four of them (three of which include MgII absorption). We also detect MgII absorption from an HVC. We find that along sightlines where both are detected, the velocity location of the low-ion gas tracks the peak in 21 cm emission. High-ionization absorption is detected along the three inner sightlines, but not along the three outer sightlines, for which CIV data exist. As inferred from 21 cm emission line maps, only one sightline may have a damped Ly-alpha system. This sightline has b= 17.5 kpc, and we detect both low- and high-ion absorption lines associated with it. The impact parameters through M31 are similar to the impact parameters of galaxies identified with MgII absorbers at redshifts 0.1<z<1.0 in a 2011 study by Rao et al. However, the M31 MgII2796 rest equivalent width values are significantly smaller. In comparison, moderate-to-strong MgII absorption from Milky Way gas is detected along all ten sightlines. Thus, this study indicates that M31 does not present itself as an absorbing galaxy which is typical of higher-redshift galaxies inferred to give rise to moderate-strength quasar absorption lines. M31 also appears not to possess an extensive large gaseous cross section, at least not along the direction of its major axis. (Abridged.)
  • We present a new measurement of the optical Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine (DR9), we select a uniform sample of 22,301 i<=21.8 quasars over an area of 2236 sq. deg with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2<z<3.5, filling in a key part of the luminosity-redshift plane for optical quasar studies. We derive the completeness of the survey through simulated quasar photometry, and check this completeness estimate using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar k-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M_i(z=2.2) = -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z=3.5. We find that a log-linear relation (in log[Phi*] - M*) for a luminosity and density evolution (LEDE) model adequately describes our data within the range 2.2<z<3.5; across this interval the break luminosity increases by a factor of ~2.3 while Phi* declines by a factor of ~6. At z<2.2 our data is reasonably well fit by a pure luminosity evolution (PLE) model. We see only a weak signature of "AGN downsizing", in line with recent studies of the hard X-ray luminosity function. We compare our measured QLF to a number of theoretical models and find that models making a variety of assumptions about quasar triggering and halo occupation can fit our data over a wide range of redshifts and luminosities.
  • Strong foreground absorption features from singly-ionized Magnesium (Mg II) are commonly observed in the spectra of quasars and are presumed to probe a wide range of galactic environments. To date, measurements of the average dark matter halo masses of intervening Mg II absorbers by way of large-scale cross-correlations with luminous galaxies have been limited to z<0.7. In this work we cross-correlate 21 strong (W{\lambda}2796>0.6 {\deg}A) Mg II absorption systems detected in quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 with ~32,000 spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at 0.7<z<1.45 from the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey. We measure dark matter (DM) halo biases of b_G=1.44\pm0.02 and b_A=1.49\pm0.45 for the DEEP2 galaxies and Mg II absorbers, respectively, indicating that their clustering amplitudes are roughly consistent. Haloes with the bias we measure for the Mg II absorbers have a corresponding mass of 1.8(+4.2/-1.6) \times 10^12h-1M_sun, although the actual mean absorber halo mass will depend on the precise distribution of absorbers within DM haloes. This mass estimate is consistent with observations at z=0.6, suggesting that the halo masses of typical Mg II absorbers do not significantly evolve from z~1. We additionally measure the average W{\lambda}2796>0.6 \AA gas covering fraction to be f =0.5 within 60 h-1kpc around the DEEP2 galaxies, and we find an absence of coincident strong Mg II absorption beyond a projected separation of ~40 h-1kpc. Although the star-forming z>1 DEEP2 galaxies are known to exhibit ubiquitous blueshifted Mg II absorption, we find no direct evidence in our small sample linking W{\lambda}2796>0.6 \AA absorbers to galaxies with ongoing star formation.
  • We present measurements of the Hubble diagram for 103 Type Ia supernovae (SNe) with redshifts 0.04 < z < 0.42, discovered during the first season (Fall 2005) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. These data fill in the redshift "desert" between low- and high-redshift SN Ia surveys. We combine the SDSS-II measurements with new distance estimates for published SN data from the ESSENCE survey, the Supernova Legacy Survey, the Hubble Space Telescope, and a compilation of nearby SN Ia measurements. Combining the SN Hubble diagram with measurements of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy sample and with CMB temperature anisotropy measurements from WMAP, we estimate the cosmological parameters w and Omega_M, assuming a spatially flat cosmological model (FwCDM) with constant dark energy equation of state parameter, w. For the FwCDM model and the combined sample of 288 SNe Ia, we find w = -0.76 +- 0.07(stat) +- 0.11(syst), Omega_M = 0.306 +- 0.019(stat) +- 0.023(syst) using MLCS2k2 and w = -0.96 +- 0.06(stat) +- 0.12(syst), Omega_M = 0.265 +- 0.016(stat) +- 0.025(syst) using the SALT-II fitter. We trace the discrepancy between these results to a difference in the rest-frame UV model combined with a different luminosity correction from color variations; these differences mostly affect the distance estimates for the SNLS and HST supernovae. We present detailed discussions of systematic errors for both light-curve methods and find that they both show data-model discrepancies in rest-frame $U$-band. For the SALT-II approach, we also see strong evidence for redshift-dependence of the color-luminosity parameter (beta). Restricting the analysis to the 136 SNe Ia in the Nearby+SDSS-II samples, we find much better agreement between the two analysis methods but with larger uncertainties.
  • Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 3 (SDSS DR3) we investigate how narrow (<700km/s) CIV and MgII quasar absorption line systems are distributed around quasars. The CIV absorbers lie in the redshift range 1.6 < z < 4 and the MgII absorbers in the range 0.4<z<2.2. By correlating absorbers with quasars on different but neighbouring lines-of-sight, we measure the clustering of absorbers around quasars on comoving scales between 4 and 30Mpc. The observed comoving correlation lengths are r_o~5h^-1Mpc, similar to those observed for bright galaxies at these redshifts. Comparing with correlations between absorbers and the quasars in whose spectra they are identified then implies: (i) that quasars destroy absorbers to comoving distances of ~300kpc (CIV) and ~800kpc (MgII) along their lines-of-sight; (ii) that >40% of CIV absorbers within 3,000km/s of the QSO are not a result of large-scale clustering but rather are directly associated with the quasar itself; (iii) that this intrinsic absorber population extends to outflow velocities of order 12,000km/s; (iv) that this outflow component is present in both radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars; and (v) that a small high-velocity outflow component is observed in the MgII population, but any further intrinsic absorber component is undetectable in our clustering analysis. We also find an indication that absorption systems within 3,000km/s are more abundant for radio-loud than for radio-quiet quasars. This suggests either that radio-loud objects live in more massive halos, or that their radio activity generates an additional low-velocity outflow, or both.
  • This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05 - 0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.
  • We quantify the variability of faint unresolved optical sources using a catalog based on multiple SDSS imaging observations. The catalog covers SDSS Stripe 82, and contains 58 million photometric observations in the SDSS ugriz system for 1.4 million unresolved sources. In each photometric bandpass we compute various low-order lightcurve statistics and use them to select and study variable sources. We find that 2% of unresolved optical sources brighter than g=20.5 appear variable at the 0.05 mag level (rms) simultaneously in the g and r bands. The majority (2/3) of these variable sources are low-redshift (<2) quasars, although they represent only 2% of all sources in the adopted flux-limited sample. We find that at least 90% of quasars are variable at the 0.03 mag level (rms) and confirm that variability is as good a method for finding low-redshift quasars as is the UV excess color selection (at high Galactic latitudes). We analyze the distribution of lightcurve skewness for quasars and find that is centered on zero. We find that about 1/4 of the variable stars are RR Lyrae stars, and that only 0.5% of stars from the main stellar locus are variable at the 0.05 mag level. The distribution of lightcurve skewness in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram on the main stellar locus is found to be bimodal (with one mode consistent with Algol-like behavior). Using over six hundred RR Lyrae stars, we demonstrate rich halo substructure out to distances of 100 kpc. We extrapolate these results to expected performance by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and estimate that it will obtain well-sampled 2% accurate, multi-color lightcurves for ~2 million low-redshift quasars, and will discover at least 50 million variable stars.
  • We report the first result of the clustering analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars. We compute the two-point correlation function (2PCF) of SDSS quasars in redshift space at $8h^{-1}{\rm Mpc} < s < 500h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$, with particular attention to its baryonic signature. Our sample consists of 19986 quasars extracted from the SDSS Data Release 4 (DR4). The redshift range of the sample is $0.72 \le z \le 2.24$ (the mean redshift is $\bar z = 1.46$) and the reddening-corrected $i$-band apparent magnitude range is $15.0 \le m_{i,{\rm rc}} \le 19.1$. Due to the relatively low number density of the quasar sample, the bump in the power spectrum due to the baryon density, $\Omega_{\rm b}$, is not clearly visible. The effect of the baryon density is, however, to distort the overall shape of the 2PCF.The degree of distortion makes it an interesting alternate measure of the baryonic signature. Assuming a scale-independent linear bias and the spatially flat universe, i.e., $\Omega_{\rm b} + \Omega_{\rm d} + \Omega_\Lambda =1$, where $\Omega_{\rm d}$ and $\Omega_\Lambda$ denote the density parameters of dark matter and the cosmological constant, we combine the observed quasar 2PCF and the predicted matter 2PCF to put constraints on $\Omega_{\rm b}$ and $\Omega_\Lambda$. Our result is fitted as $0.80- 2.8\Omega_{\rm b} < \Omega_\Lambda < 0.90 - 1.4\Omega_{\rm b}$ at the 2$\sigma$ confidence level, which is consistent with results from other cosmological observations such as WMAP. (abridged)
  • We perform an objective classification of 170,000 galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using the Karhunen-Lo\`eve (KL) transform. With about one-sixth of the total set of galaxy spectra which will be obtained by the survey, we are able to carry out the most extensive analysis of its kind to date. The formalism proposed by Connolly and Szalay is adopted to correct for gappy regions in the spectra, and to derive eigenspectra and eigencoefficients. From this analysis, we show that this gap-correction formalism leads to a converging set of eigenspectra and KL-repaired spectra. Furthermore, KL eigenspectra of galaxies are found to be convergent not only as a function of iteration, but also as a function of the number of randomly selected galaxy spectra used in the analysis. From these data a set of ten eigenspectra of galaxy spectra are constructed, with rest-wavelength coverage 3450-8350 angstrom. The eigencoefficients describing these galaxies naturally place the spectra into several classes defined by the plane formed by the first three eigencoefficients of each spectrum. Spectral types, corresponding to different Hubble-types and galaxies with extreme emission lines, are identified for the 170,000 spectra and are shown to be complementary to existing spectral classifications. From a non-parametric classification technique, we find that the population of galaxies can be divided into three classes which correspond to early late- through to intermediate late-types galaxies. (Abridged)