• We have synthesized the anti-symmetric spin exchange interaction (ASI), which is also called the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, in a superconducting circuit containing five superconducting qubits connected to a bus resonator, by periodically modulating the transition frequencies of the qubits with different modulation phases. This allows us to show the chiral spin dynamics in three-, four- and five-spin clusters. We also demonstrate a three-spin chiral logic gate and entangle up to five qubits in Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. Our results pave the way for quantum simulation of magnetism with ASI and quantum computation with chiral spin states.
  • The law of statistical physics dictates that generic closed quantum many-body systems initialized in nonequilibrium will thermalize under their own dynamics. However, the emergence of many-body localization (MBL) owing to the interplay between interaction and disorder, which is in stark contrast to Anderson localization that only addresses noninteracting particles in the presence of disorder, greatly challenges this concept because it prevents the systems from evolving to the ergodic thermalized state. One critical evidence of MBL is the long-time logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy, and a direct observation of it is still elusive due to the experimental challenges in multiqubit single-shot measurement and quantum state tomography. Here we present an experiment of fully emulating the MBL dynamics with a 10-qubit superconducting quantum processor, which represents a spin-1/2 XY model featuring programmable disorder and long-range spin-spin interactions. We provide essential signatures of MBL, such as the imbalance due to the initial nonequilibrium, the violation of eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, and, more importantly, the direct evidence of the long-time logarithmic growth of entanglement entropy. Our results lay solid foundations for precisely simulating the intriguing physics of quantum many-body systems on the platform of large-scale multiqubit superconducting quantum processors.
  • Here we report on the production and tomography of genuinely entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states with up to 10 qubits connecting to a bus resonator in a superconducting circuit, where the resonator-mediated qubit-qubit interactions are used to controllably entangle multiple qubits and to operate on different pairs of qubits in parallel. The resulting 10-qubit density matrix is unambiguously probed, with a fidelity of $0.668 \pm 0.025$. Our results demonstrate the largest entanglement created so far in solid-state architectures, and pave the way to large-scale quantum computation.
  • Superconducting quantum circuits are promising candidate for building scalable quantum computers. Here, we use a four-qubit superconducting quantum processor to solve a two-dimensional system of linear equations based on a quantum algorithm proposed by Harrow, Hassidim, and Lloyd [Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{103}, 150502 (2009)], which promises an exponential speedup over classical algorithms under certain circumstances. We benchmark the solver with quantum inputs and outputs, and characterize it by non-trace-preserving quantum process tomography, which yields a process fidelity of $0.837\pm0.006$. Our results highlight the potential of superconducting quantum circuits for applications in solving large-scale linear systems, a ubiquitous task in science and engineering.
  • High quality factor coplanar resonators are critical elements in superconducting quantum circuits. We describe the design, fabrication and measurement of stepped impedance resonators (SIRs), which have more compact size than commonly used uniform impedance resonators (UIRs). With properly chosen impedance ratio, SIRs can be much shorter in total length than that of UIRs. Two kinds of designs containing both SIRs and UIRs are fabricated and measured. The power dependence of the extracted internal quality factors (Qi) for all the resonators indicated that SIRs and UIRs had comparable performance at high incident power. However, as the incident power decreased, the internal quality factor of SIRs decreased much slower than that of UIRs. All the SIRs in design I kept near half-million Qi at single-photon level, while the two UIRs on the same chip decreased heavily to less than $2\times10^5$. These results indicate potential advantages of SIRs in quantum computer architectures: they consume less space than UIRs, while perform excellent under single-photon level. The resonators in design II were measured under a large residual magnetic field. The measured results showed that the internal quality factor of all the SIRs and UIRs were more or less suppressed. Such behavior confirmed that trapped vortices in the coplanar resonators provide another loss channel.
  • Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an attractive nonconventional lithographic technique in the fabrication of superconducting nanowires for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) with large effective detection areas or multi-element devices consisting of hundreds of SNSPDs, due to its low cost and high throughput. In this work, NIL was used to pattern superconducting nanowires with meander-type structures based on ultra-thin (~4 nm) Nb films deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering at room temperature. A combination of thermal-NIL and UV-NIL was exploited to transfer the meander pattern from the imprint hard mold to Nb films. The hard mold based on Si wafer was defined by e-beam lithography (EBL), which was almost nonexpendable due to the application of IPS as a soft mold to transfer the patterns to the imprint resist in the NIL process. The specimens fabricated by NIL keep good superconducting properties which are comparable to that by conventional EBL process.