• We report the discovery of a new quasar: SDSS J022155.26-064916.6. This object was discovered while reducing spectra of a sample of stars being considered as spectrophotometric standards for the Dark Energy Survey. The flux and wavelength calibrated spectrum is presented with four spectral lines identified. From these lines, the redshift is determined to be z is approximately equal to 0.806. In addition, the rest-frame u-, g-, and r-band luminosity, determined using a k-correction obtained with synthetic photometry of a proxy QSO, are reported as 7.496 $\times 10^{13}$ solar luminosities, 2.049 $\times 10^{13}$ solar luminosities, and $1.896 \times 10^{13}$ solar luminosities, respectively.
  • We report on SPT-CLJ2011-5228, a giant system of arcs created by a cluster at $z=1.06$. The arc system is notable for the presence of a bright central image. The source is a Lyman Break galaxy at $z_s=2.39$ and the mass enclosed within the 14 arc second radius Einstein ring is $10^{14.2}$ solar masses. We perform a full light profile reconstruction of the lensed images to precisely infer the parameters of the mass distribution. The brightness of the central image demands that the central total density profile of the lens be shallow. By fitting the dark matter as a generalized Navarro-Frenk-White profile---with a free parameter for the inner density slope---we find that the break radius is $270^{+48}_{-76}$ kpc, and that the inner density falls with radius to the power $-0.38\pm0.04$ at 68 percent confidence. Such a shallow profile is in strong tension with our understanding of relaxed cold dark matter halos; dark matter only simulations predict the inner density should fall as $r^{-1}$. The tension can be alleviated if this cluster is in fact a merger; a two halo model can also reconstruct the data, with both clumps (density going as $r^{-0.8}$ and $r^{-1.0}$) much more consistent with predictions from dark matter only simulations. At the resolution of our Dark Energy Survey imaging, we are unable to choose between these two models, but we make predictions for forthcoming Hubble Space Telescope imaging that will decisively distinguish between them.
  • We present the discovery and preliminary characterization of a gravitationally lensed quasar with a source redshift $z_{s}=2.74$ and image separation of $2.9"$ lensed by a foreground $z_{l}=0.40$ elliptical galaxy. Since the images of gravitationally lensed quasars are the superposition of multiple point sources and a foreground lensing galaxy, we have developed a morphology independent multi-wavelength approach to the photometric selection of lensed quasar candidates based on Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM) supervised machine learning. Using this technique and $gi$ multicolour photometric observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES), near IR $JK$ photometry from the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) and WISE mid IR photometry, we have identified a candidate system with two catalogue components with $i_{AB}=18.61$ and $i_{AB}=20.44$ comprised of an elliptical galaxy and two blue point sources. Spectroscopic follow-up with NTT and the use of an archival AAT spectrum show that the point sources can be identified as a lensed quasar with an emission line redshift of $z=2.739\pm0.003$ and a foreground early type galaxy with $z=0.400\pm0.002$. We model the system as a single isothermal ellipsoid and find the Einstein radius $\theta_E \sim 1.47"$, enclosed mass $M_{enc} \sim 4 \times 10^{11}$M$_{\odot}$ and a time delay of $\sim$52 days. The relatively wide separation, month scale time delay duration and high redshift make this an ideal system for constraining the expansion rate beyond a redshift of 1.
  • We present low-resolution, rest-frame ~ 5 - 12 micron Spitzer/IRS spectra of two lensed z ~ 2 UV-bright star-forming galaxies, SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3. Using the magnification boost from lensing, we are able to study the physical properties of these objects in greater detail than is possible for unlensed systems. In both targets, we detect strong PAH emission at 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3 microns, indicating the presence of vigorous star formation. For J1206, we find a steeply rising continuum and significant [S IV] emission, suggesting that a moderately hard radiation field is powering continuum emission from small dust grains. The strength of the [S IV] emission also implies a sub-solar metallicity of ~ 0.5 Z_{Sun}, confirming published rest-frame optical measurements. In J0901, the PAH lines have large rest-frame equivalent widths (> 1 micron) and the continuum rises slowly with wavelength, suggesting that any AGN contribution to L_{IR} is insignificant, in contrast to the implications of optical emission-line diagnostics. Using [O III] line flux as a proxy for AGN strength, we estimate that the AGN in J0901 provides only a small fraction of its mid-infrared continuum flux. By combining the detection of [Ar II] with an upper limit on [Ar III] emission, we infer a metallicity of > 1.3 Z_{Sun}. This work highlights the importance of combining rest-frame optical and mid-IR spectroscopy in order to understand the detailed properties of star-forming galaxies at high redshift.
  • We present Keck II NIRSPEC rest-frame optical spectra for three recently discovered lensed galaxies: the Cosmic Horseshoe (z = 2.38), the Clone (z = 2.00), and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 (z = 2.26). The boost in signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) from gravitational lensing provides an unusually detailed view of the physical conditions in these objects. A full complement of high S/N rest-frame optical emission lines is measured, spanning from rest-frame 3600 to 6800AA, including robust detections of fainter lines such as H-gamma, [SII]6717,6732, and in one instance [NeII]3869. SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 shows evidence for AGN activity, and therefore we focus our analysis on star-forming regions in the Cosmic Horseshoe and the Clone. For these two objects, we estimate a wide range of physical properties, including star-formation rate (SFR), metallicity, dynamical mass, and dust extinction. In all respects, the lensed objects appear fairly typical of UV-selected star-forming galaxies at z~2. The Clone occupies a position on the emission-line diagnostic diagram of [OIII]/H-beta vs. [NII]/H-alpha that is offset from the locations of z~0 galaxies. Our new NIRSPEC measurements may provide quantitative insights into why high-redshift objects display such properties. From the [SII] line ratio, high electron densities (~1000 cm^(-3)) are inferred compared to local galaxies, and [OIII]/[OII] line ratios indicate higher ionization parameters compared to the local population. Building on previous similar results at z~2, these measurements provide further evidence (at high S/N) that star-forming regions are significantly different in high-redshift galaxies, compared to their local counterparts (abridged).
  • We report on the discovery of a very bright z = 2.00 star-forming galaxy that is strongly lensed by a foreground z=0.422 luminous red galaxy (LRG). This system was found in a systematic search for bright arcs lensed by LRGs and brightest cluster galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 sample. Follow-up observations on the Subaru 8.2m telescope on Mauna Kea and the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory confirmed the lensing nature of this system. A simple lens model for the system, assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid mass distribution, yields an Einstein radius of 3.82 +/- 0.03 arcsec or 14.8 +/- 0.1 kpc/h at the lens redshift. The total projected mass enclosed within the Einstein radius is 2.10 +/- 0.03 x 10^12 M_sun/h, and the magnification factor for the source galaxy is 27 +/- 1. Combining the lens model with our gVriz photometry, we find an (unlensed) star formation rate for the source galaxy of 32 M_sun/h / yr, adopting a fiducial constant star formation rate model with an age of 100 Myr and E(B-V) = 0.25. With an apparent magnitude of r = 19.9, this system is among the very brightest lensed z >= 2 galaxies, and provides an excellent opportunity to pursue detailed studies of the physical properties of an individual high-redshift star-forming galaxy.
  • We continue our series of papers describing the results of a photometric survey of open star clusters, primarily in the southern hemisphere, taken in the u'g'r'i'z' filter system. The entire observed sample covered more than 100 clusters, but here we present data only on NGC 188, which is one of the oldest open clusters known in the Milky Way. We fit the Padova theoretical isochrones to our data. Assuming a solar metallicity for NGC 188, we find a distance of 1700+/-100 pc, an age of 7.5+/-0.7 Gyr, and a reddening E(B-V) of 0.025+/-0.005. This yields a distance modulus of 11.23+/-0.14.
  • The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a 5000 sq deg griz imaging survey to be conducted using a proposed 3 sq deg (2.2deg-diameter) wide-field mosaic camera on the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The primary scientific goal of the DES is to constrain dark energy cosmological parameters via four complementary methods: galaxy cluster counting, weak lensing, galaxy angular correlations, and Type Ia supernovae, supported by precision photometric redshifts. Here we present the photometric calibration plans for the DES, including a discussion of standard stars and field-to-field calibrations.
  • We report on the serendipitous discovery of the brightest Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) currently known, a galaxy at z=2.73 that is being strongly lensed by the z=0.38 Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) SDSS J002240.91+143110.4. The arc of this gravitational lens system, which we have dubbed the "8 o'clock arc" due to its time of discovery, was initially identified in the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4); followup observations on the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory confirmed the lensing nature of this system and led to the identification of the arc's spectrum as that of an LBG. The arc has a spectrum and a redshift remarkably similar to those of the previous record-holder for brightest LBG (MS 1512-cB58, a.k.a "cB58"), but, with an estimated total magnitude of (g,r,i) = (20.0,19.2,19.0) and surface brightness of (mu_g,mu_r,mu_i) = (23.3, 22.5, 22.3) mag/arcsec^2, the 8 o'clock arc is thrice as bright. The 8 o'clock arc, which consists of three lensed images of the LBG, is 162deg (9.6arcsec) long and has a length-to-width ratio of 6:1. A fourth image of the LBG -- a counter-image -- can also be identified in the ARC 3.5m g-band images. A simple lens model for the system assuming a singular isothermal ellipsoid potential yields an Einstein radius of 2.91+/-0.14 arcsec, a total mass for the lensing LRG (within the (10.6+/-0.5)/h kpc enclosed by the lensed images) of 1.04x10^12/h Msun, and a magnification factor for the LBG of 12.3(+15/-3.6). The LBG itself is intrinsically quite luminous (approximately 6L*) and shows indications of massive recent star formation, perhaps as high as 160/h Msun/year.
  • We report improved transformation equations between the $u'g'r'i'z'$ and $UBVR_CI_C$ photometric systems. Although the details of the transformations depend on luminosity class, we find a typical rms scatter on the order of 0.001 magnitude if the sample is limited to main sequence stars. Furthermore, we find an accurate transformation requires complex, multi-color dependencies for the bluer bandpasses. Results for giant stars will be reported in a subsequent paper.
  • We identify galaxy groups and clusters in volume-limited samples of the SDSS redshift survey, using a redshift-space friends-of-friends algorithm. We optimize the friends-of-friends linking lengths to recover galaxy systems that occupy the same dark matter halos, using a set of mock catalogs created by populating halos of N-body simulations with galaxies. Extensive tests with these mock catalogs show that no combination of perpendicular and line-of-sight linking lengths is able to yield groups and clusters that simultaneously recover the true halo multiplicity function, projected size distribution, and velocity dispersion. We adopt a linking length combination that yields, for galaxy groups with ten or more members: a group multiplicity function that is unbiased with respect to the true halo multiplicity function; an unbiased median relation between the multiplicities of groups and their associated halos; a spurious group fraction of less than ~1%; a halo completeness of more than ~97%; the correct projected size distribution as a function of multiplicity; and a velocity dispersion distribution that is ~20% too low at all multiplicities. These results hold over a range of mock catalogs that use different input recipes of populating halos with galaxies. We apply our group-finding algorithm to the SDSS data and obtain three group and cluster catalogs for three volume-limited samples that cover 3495.1 square degrees on the sky. We correct for incompleteness caused by fiber collisions and survey edges, and obtain measurements of the group multiplicity function, with errors calculated from realistic mock catalogs. These multiplicity function measurements provide a key constraint on the relation between galaxy populations and dark matter halos.
  • We present a new catalog of isolated galaxies obtained through an automated systematic search. These 2980 isolated galaxies were found in approximately 2099 sq deg of sky in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1 (SDSS DR1) photometry. The selection algorithm, implementing a variation on the criteria developed by Karachentseva in 1973, proved to be very efficient and fast. This catalog will be useful for studies of the general galaxy characteristics. Here we report on our results.
  • We present initial results of a photometric survey of open star clusters, primarily in the southern hemisphere, taken in the u'g'r'i'z' filter system. While our entire observed sample covers more than 100 clusters, here we present data for NGC2548 (M48) which is a cluster characterized in the UBV and DDO photometric systems. We compare our results to the published values from other observers and to the Padova theoretical isochrones and metallicity curves. These observations demonstrate that the u'g'r'i'z' filters can play an important role in determining the metallicity of stars and clusters. We begin this series of papers with a study of NGC2548 because we have obtained data of this cluster not only with our main program telescope, the CTIO Curtis-Schmidt, but also with the US Naval Observatory (USNO) 1.0m telescope (the telescope used to define the u'g'r'i'z' system), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 0.5m Photometric Telescope (the photometric monitoring telescope used to calibrate the SDSS 2.5m telescope imaging data). We have used the data from this study to validate our ability to transform measurements obtained on other telescopes to the standard USNO 1.0m u'g'r'i'z' system. This validation is particularly important for very red stars, for which the original u'g'r'i'z' standard star network is poorly constrained.
  • The discovery of an optical counterpart to GRB010222 (detected by BeppoSAX; Piro 2001) was announced 4.4 hrs after the burst by Henden (2001a). The Sloan Digital Sky Survey's 0.5m photometric telescope (PT) and 2.5m survey telescope were used to observe the afterglow of GRB010222 starting 4.8 hours after the GRB. The 0.5m PT observed the afterglow in five, 300 sec g' band exposures over the course of half an hour, measuring a temporal decay rate in this short period of F_nu \propto t^{-1.0+/-0.5}. The 2.5m camera imaged the counterpart nearly simultaneously in five filters (u' g' r' i' z'), with r' = 18.74+/-0.02 at 12:10 UT. These multicolor observations, corrected for reddening and the afterglow's temporal decay, are well fit by the power-law F_nu \propto nu^{-0.90+/-0.03} with the exception of the u' band UV flux which is 20% below this slope. We examine possible interpretations of this spectral shape, including source extinction in a star forming region.
  • We have used a sample of 15749 galaxies taken from the Las Campanas Redshift Survey to investigate the effects of environment on the rate of star formation (SFR) in galaxies. The size and homogeneity of this data set allows us to sample, for the first time, the entire range of galactic environment, from the voids to the clusters, in a uniform manner, thus, we could decouple the local galaxy density from the membership in associations. This decoupling is very crucial for constraining the physical processes responsible for the environmental dependencies of SFR. On the other hand, the use of an automatically-measured concentration index (C), rather than Hubble type, allows us to cleanly separate the morphological component from the SFR vs. environment relationship. We find that cluster galaxies exhibit lower SFR for the same C than field galaxies, while a further division of clusters by `richness' reveals a new possible excitation of `starbursts' in poor clusters. Meanwhile, a more general environmental investigation reveals that the SFR of a given C shows a continuous correlation with the local density. Interestingly, this trend is also observed both inside and outside of clusters, implying that physical processes responsible for this correlation might not be intrinsic to the cluster environment. On the other hand, galaxies with differing levels of SFR appear to respond differently to the local density. Low levels of SFR are more sensitive to environment inside than outside of clusters. In contrast, high levels of SFR, identified as ``starbursts'', are as sensitive to local density in the field as in clusters. We conclude that at least two separate processes are responsible for the environmental sensitivity of the SFR.
  • The Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS) contains 23697 galaxies, with an average redshift $z = 0.1$, distributed over six $1.5\arcdeg$ by $80\arcdeg$ slices in the North and South galactic caps. We have computed the power spectrum $P(k)$ for LCRS galaxies over wavelengths $\lambda = 2\pi / k = 5 - 400\ h^{-1}$~Mpc. The LCRS $P(k)$ may be approximated as $\propto k^{-1.8 \pm 0.1}$ for small scales $\lambda = 5 - 30\ h^{-1}$~Mpc, changing to $\propto k^{1 \pm 1}$ for large scales $\lambda \approx 200 - 400\ h^{-1}$~Mpc. The overall amplitude corresponds to $\sigma_8 = 1.0 \pm 0.1$ in redshift space. Comparisons to the power spectra of other redshift surveys will be presented; the LCRS results agree best with those from the combined Center for Astrophysics and Southern Sky redshift surveys. We find evidence for type- dependent clustering differences in the LCRS, such that galaxies brighter than about $M^* - 1$ appear about 50\% more strongly clustered than those fainter, and that a sample of emission galaxies shows 30\% weaker clustering than the full LCRS sample. On large scales $\lambda \gtrsim 40\ h^{-1}$~Mpc, we have also fit the LCRS results to various linear CDM models, and find that a number of them could meet the constraints set by the LCRS power spectrum, the Hubble constant range $0.5 \lesssim h \lesssim 0.8$, the abundance of galaxy clusters, and the reasonable assumption that LCRS galaxies are roughly unbiased tracers of the mass, relative to the normalization provided by the 4-year COBE DMR data. The possibilites include open CDM or flat non-zero cosmological-constant CDM models with $\Omega_0 \approx 0.4-0.6$ and shape parameter $\Gamma \approx 0.2-0.3$, as well as flat $\Omega_0 = 1$ models with massive neutrino density $\Omega_\nu \approx 0.2-0.3$ or a spectral tilt $n \approx 0.7-0.8$. (abridged)
  • The Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS) consists of 26418 redshifts of galaxies selected from a CCD-based catalog obtained in the $R$ band. The survey covers over 700 square degrees in 6 strips, each 1.5$\arcdeg$ x 80$\arcdeg$, three each in the North and South galactic caps. The median redshift in the survey is about 30000 km~s$^{-1}$. Essential features of the galaxy selection and redshift measurement methods are described and tabulated here. These details are important for subsequent analysis of the LCRS data. Two dimensional representations of the redshift distributions reveal many repetitions of voids, on the scale of about 5000 km~s$^{-1}$, sharply bounded by large walls of galaxies as seen in nearby surveys. Statistical investigations of the mean galaxy properties and of clustering on the large scale are reported elsewhere. These include studies of the luminosity function, power spectrum in two and three dimensions, correlation function, pairwise velocity distribution, identification of large scale structures, and a group catalog. The LCRS redshift catalog will be made available to interested investigators at an internet web site and in archival form as an Astrophysical Journal CD-ROM.