• During its four years of photometric observations, the Kepler space telescope detected thousands of exoplanets and exoplanet candidates. One of Kepler's greatest heritages has been the confirmation and characterization of hundreds of multi-planet systems via Transit Timing Variations (TTVs). However, there are many interesting candidate systems displaying TTVs on such long time scales that the existing Kepler observations are of insufficient length to confirm and characterize them by means of this technique. To continue with Kepler's unique work we have organized the "Kepler Object of Interest Network" (KOINet). The goals of KOINet are, among others, to complete the TTV curves of systems where Kepler did not cover the interaction timescales well. KOINet has been operational since March, 2014. Here we show some promising first results obtained from analyzing seven primary transits of KOI-0410.01, KOI-0525.01, KOI-0760.01, and KOI-0902.01 in addition to Kepler data, acquired during the first and second observing seasons of KOINet. While carefully choosing the targets we set demanding constraints about timing precision (at least 1 minute) and photometric precision (as good as 1 part per thousand) that were achieved by means of our observing strategies and data analysis techniques. For KOI-0410.01, new transit data revealed a turn-over of its TTVs. We carried out an in-depth study of the system, that is identified in the NASA's Data Validation Report as false positive. Among others, we investigated a gravitationally-bound hierarchical triple star system, and a planet-star system. While the simultaneous transit fitting of ground and space-based data allowed for a planet solution, we could not fully reject the three-star scenario. New data, already scheduled in the upcoming 2018 observing season, will set tighter constraints on the nature of the system.
  • Extrasolar planets on eccentric short-period orbits provide a laboratory in which to study radiative and tidal interactions between a planet and its host star under extreme forcing conditions. Studying such systems probes how the planet's atmosphere redistributes the time-varying heat flux from its host and how the host star responds to transient tidal distortion. Here, we report the insights into the planet-star interactions in HAT-P-2's eccentric planetary system gained from the analysis of 350 hr of 4.5 micron observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The observations show no sign of orbit-to-orbit variability nor of orbital evolution of the eccentric planetary companion, HAT-P-2 b. The extensive coverage allows us to better differentiate instrumental systematics from the transient heating of HAT-P-2 b's 4.5 micron photosphere and yields the detection of stellar pulsations with an amplitude of approximately 40 ppm. These pulsation modes correspond to exact harmonics of the planet's orbital frequency, indicative of a tidal origin. Transient tidal effects can excite pulsation modes in the envelope of a star, but, to date, such pulsations had only been detected in highly eccentric stellar binaries. Current stellar models are unable to reproduce HAT-P-2's pulsations, suggesting that our understanding of the interactions at play in this system is incomplete.
  • We report the discovery of the sixth known eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) system, SDSS J1152+0248, with a 2.3968 +/- 0.0003 h orbital period, in data from the Kepler Mission's K2 continuation. Analysing and modelling the K2 data together with ground-based fast photometry, spectroscopy, and radial-velocity measurements, we determine that the primary is a DA-type WD with mass M1 = 0.47 +/- 0.11 Msun, radius R1 = 0.0197 +/- 0.0035 Rsun, and cooling age t1 = 52 +/- 36 Myr. No lines are detected, to within our sensitivity, from the secondary WD, but it is likely also of type DA. Its central surface brightness, as measured from the secondary eclipse, is 0.31 of the primary's surface brightness. Its mass, radius, and cooling age, respectively, are M2 = 0.44 +/- 0.09 Msun, R2 = 0.0223 +0.0064 -0.0050 Rsun, and t2 = 230 +/- 100 Myr. SDSS J1152+0248 is a near twin of the double-lined eclipsing WD system CSS 41177.
  • We report the detection and characterization of two short-period, Neptune-sized planets around the active host star Kepler-210. The host star's parameters derived from those planets are (a) mutually inconsistent and (b) do not conform to the expected host star parameters. We furthermore report the detection of transit timing variations (TTVs) in the O-C diagrams for both planets. We explore various scenarios that explain and resolve those discrepancies. A simple scenario consistent with all data appears to be one that attributes substantial eccentricities to the inner short-period planets and that interprets the TTVs as due to the action of another, somewhat longer period planet. To substantiate our suggestions, we present the results of N-body simulations that modeled the TTVs and that checked the stability of the Kepler-210 system.
  • The past three decades have seen prodigious advances in astronomy and astrophysics. Beginning with the exploration of our solar system and continuing through the pioneering Explorers and Great Observatories of today, NASA missions have made essential contributions to these advances. This roadmap presents a science-driven 30-year vision for the future of NASA Astrophysics that builds on these achievements to address some of our most ancient and fundamental questions: Are we alone? How did we get here? How does the universe work? The search for the answers constitutes the Enduring Quests of this roadmap. Building on the priorities identified in New Worlds, New Horizons, we envision future science investigations laid out in three Eras, with each representing roughly ten years of mission development in a given field. The immediate Near-Term Era covers ongoing NASA-led activities and planned missions. This will be followed by the missions of the Formative Era, which will build on the preceding technological developments and scientific discoveries, with remarkable capabilities that will enable breakthroughs across the landscape of astrophysics. These will then lay the foundations for the Daring Visions of the Visionary Era: missions and explorations that will take us deep into unchartered scientific and technological terrain. The roadmap outlined herein will require the vision and wherewithal to undertake highly ambitious programs over the next 30 years. The discoveries that emerge will inspire generations of citizen scientists young and old, and inspire all of humanity for decades to come.
  • Unlike hot Jupiters or other gas giants, super-Earths are expected to have a wide variety of compositions, ranging from terrestrial bodies like our own to more gaseous planets like Neptune. Observations of transiting systems, which allow us to directly measure planet masses and radii and constrain atmospheric properties, are key to understanding the compositional diversity of the planets in this mass range. Although Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting super-Earth candidates over the past four years, the majority of these planets orbit stars that are too far away and too faint to allow for detailed atmospheric characterization and reliable mass estimates. Ground-based transit surveys focus on much brighter stars, but most lack the sensitivity to detect planets in this size range. One way to get around the difficulty of finding these smaller planets in transit is to start by choosing targets that are already known to contain super-Earth sized bodies detected using the radial velocity technique. Here we present results from a Spitzer program to observe six of the most favorable RV detected super-Earth systems, including HD 1461, HD 7924, HD 156668, HIP 57274, and GJ 876. We find no evidence for transits in any of their 4.5 micron flux light curves, and place limits on the allowed transit depths and corresponding planet radii that rule out even the most dense and iron-rich compositions for these objects. We also observed HD 97658, but the observation window was based on a possible ground-based transit detection (Henry et al. 2011) that was later ruled out; thus the window did not include the predicted time for the transit detection recently made by MOST (Dragomir et al. 2013).
  • Variations in the timing of transiting exoplanets provide a powerful tool detecting additional planets in the system. Thus, the aim of this paper is to discuss the plausibility of transit timing variations on the Qatar-1 system by means of primary transit light curves analysis. Furthermore, we provide an interpretation of the timing variation. We observed Qatar-1 between March 2011 and October 2012 using the 1.2 m OLT telescope in Germany and the 0.6 m PTST telescope in Spain. We present 26 primary transits of the hot Jupiter Qatar-1b. In total, our light curves cover a baseline of 18 months. We report on indications for possible long-term transit timing variations (TTVs). Assuming that these TTVs are true, we present two different scenarios that could explain them. Our reported $\sim$ 190 days TTV signal can be reproduced by either a weak perturber in resonance with Qatar-1b, or by a massive body in the brown dwarf regime. More observations and radial velocity monitoring are required to better constrain the perturber's characteristics. We also refine the ephemeris of Qatar-1b, which we find to be \mbox{$T_0 = 2456157.42204 \pm 0.0001$ \bjdtdb} and \mbox{$P = 1.4200246 \pm 0.0000007$ days}, and improve the system orbital parameters.
  • We present three transits of GJ 1214b, observed as part of the Apache Point Observatory Survey of Transit Lightcurves of Exoplanets (APOSTLE). We used APOSTLE r-band lightcurves in conjunction with previously gathered data of GJ 1214b to re-derive system parameters. By using parameters such as transit duration and ingress/egress length we are able to reduce the degeneracies between parameters in the fitted transit model, which is a preferred condition for Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques typically used to quantify uncertainties in measured parameters. The joint analysis of this multi-wavelength dataset confirms earlier estimates of system parameters including planetary orbital period, the planet-to-star radius ratio and stellar density. We fit the photometric spectralenergy distribution of GJ 1214 to derive stellar luminosity, which we then use to derive its absolute mass and radius. From these derived stellar properties and previously published radial velocity data we were able to refine estimates of the absolute parameters for the planet GJ 1214b. Transit times derived from our study show no evidence for strong transit timing variations. Some lightcurves we present show features that we believe are due to stellar activity. During the first night we observed a rise in the out-of-eclipse flux of GJ 1214 with a characteristic fast-rise exponential decay shape commonly associated with stellar flares. On the second night we observed a minor brightening during transit, which we believe might have been caused by the planet obscuring a star-spot on the stellar disk.
  • We present observations of seven transits and seven eclipses of the transiting planet system HD 189733 taken with Spitzer IRAC at 8 microns. We use a new correction for the detector ramp variation with a double-exponential function. Our main findings are: (1) an upper limit on the variability of the day-side planet flux of 2.7% (68% confidence); (2) the most precise set of transit times measured for a transiting planet, with an average accuracy of 3 seconds; (3) a lack of transit-timing variations, excluding the presence of second planets in this system above 20% of the mass of Mars in low-order mean-motion resonance at 95% confidence; (4) a confirmation of the planet's phase variation, finding the night side is 64% as bright as the day side, as well as an upper limit on the night-side variability of 17% (68% confidence); (5) a better correction for stellar variability at 8 micron causing the phase function to peak 3.5 hrs before secondary eclipse, confirming that the advection and radiation timescales are comparable at the 8 micron photosphere; (6) variation in the depth of transit, which possibly implies variations in the surface brightness of the portion of the star occulted by the planet, posing a fundamental limit on non-simultaneous multi-wavelength transit absorption measurements of planet atmospheres; (7) a measurement of the infrared limb-darkening of the star, in agreement with stellar atmosphere models; (8) an offset in the times of secondary eclipse of 69 sec, which is mostly accounted for by a 31 sec light travel time delay and 33 sec delay due to the shift of ingress and egress by the planet hot spot; this confirms that the phase variation is due to an offset hot spot on the planet; (9) a retraction of the claimed eccentricity of this system due to the offset of secondary eclipse; and (10) high precision measurements of the parameters of this system.
  • CoRoT, the pioneer space-based transit search, steadily provides thousands of high-precision light curves with continuous time sampling over periods of up to 5 months. The transits of a planet perturbed by an additional object are not strictly periodic. By studying the transit timing variations (TTVs), additional objects can be detected in the system. A transit timing analysis of CoRoT-1b is carried out to constrain the existence of additional planets in the system. We used data obtained by an improved version of the CoRoT data pipeline (version 2.0). Individual transits were fitted to determine the mid-transit times, and we analyzed the derived $O-C$ diagram. N-body integrations were used to place limits on secondary planets. No periodic timing variations with a period shorter than the observational window (55 days) are found. The presence of an Earth-mass Trojan is not likely. A planet of mass greater than $\sim 1$ Earth mass can be ruled out by the present data if the object is in a 2:1 (exterior) mean motion resonance with CoRoT-1b. Considering initially circular orbits: (i) super-Earths (less than 10 Earth-masses) are excluded for periods less than about 3.5 days, (ii) Saturn-like planets can be ruled out for periods less than about 5 days, (iii) Jupiter-like planets should have a minimum orbital period of about 6.5 days.
  • [Abridged] To simulate the kinds of observations that will eventually be obtained for exoplanets, the Deep Impact spacecraft obtained light curves of Earth at seven wavebands spanning 300-1000 nm as part of the EPOXI mission of opportunity. In this paper we analyze disc-integrated light curves, treating Earth as if it were an exoplanet, to determine if we can detect the presence of oceans and continents. We present two observations each spanning one day, taken at gibbous phases. The rotation of the planet leads to diurnal albedo variations of 15-30%, with the largest relative changes occuring at the reddest wavelengths. To characterize these variations in an unbiased manner we carry out a principal component analysis of the multi-band light curves; this analysis reveals that 98% of the diurnal color changes of Earth are due to only 2 dominant eigencolors. We use the time-variations of these two eigencolors to construct longitudinal maps of the Earth, treating it as a non-uniform Lambert sphere. We find that the spectral and spatial distributions of the eigencolors correspond to cloud-free continents and oceans; this despite the fact that our observations were taken on days with typical cloud cover. We also find that the near-infrared wavebands are particularly useful in distinguishing between land and water. Based on this experiment we conclude that it should be possible to infer the existence of water oceans on exoplanets with time-resolved broadband observations taken by a large space-based coronagraphic telescope.
  • We present the results of the first long-term (2.2 years) spectroscopic monitoring of a gravitationally lensed quasar, namely the Einstein Cross Q2237+0305. We spatially deconvolve deep VLT/FORS1 spectra to accurately separate the spectrum of the lensing galaxy from the spectra of the quasar images. Accurate cross-calibration of the observations at 31 epochs from October 2004 to December 2006 is carried out using foreground stars observed simultaneously with the quasar. The quasar spectra are further decomposed into a continuum component and several broad emission lines. We find prominent microlensing events in the quasar images A and B, while images C and D are almost quiescent on a timescale of a few months. The strongest variations are observed in the continuum, and their amplitude is larger in the blue than in the red, consistent with microlensing of an accretion disk. Variations in the intensity and profile of the broad emission lines are also reported, most prominently in the wings of the CIII] and in the center of the CIV emission lines. During a strong microlensing episode observed in quasar image A, the broad component of the CIII] is more magnified than the narrow component. In addition, the emission lines with higher ionization potentials are more magnified than the lines with lower ionization potentials, consistent with the stratification of the broad line region (BLR) infered from reverberation mapping observations.
  • The periodic eclipses of the pre-main-sequence binary, KH 15D, have been explained by a circumbinary dust ring inclined to the orbital plane, which causes occultations of the stars as they pass behind the ring edge. We compute the extinction and forward scattering of light by the edge of the dust ring to explain (1) the gradual slope directly preceding total eclipse, (2) the gradual decline at the end of ingress, and (3) the slight rise in flux at mid-eclipse. The size of the forward scattering halo indicates that the dust grains have a radius of a ~ 6 (D/3 AU) microns, where D is the distance of the edge of the ring from the system barycenter. This dust size estimate agrees well with estimates of the dust grain size from polarimetry, adding to the evidence that the ring lies at several AU. Finally, the ratio of the fluxes inside and outside eclipse independently indicates that the ring lies at a few astronomical units.
  • We present the results of the first long-term (2.2 years) spectroscopic monitoring of a gravitationally lensed quasar, namely the Einstein Cross Q2237+0305. The goal of this paper is to present the observational facts to be compared in follow-up papers with theoretical models to constrain the inner structure of the source quasar. We spatially deconvolve deep VLT/FORS1 spectra to accurately separate the spectrum of the lensing galaxy from the spectra of the quasar images. Accurate cross-calibration of the 58 observations at 31-epoch from October 2004 to December 2006 is carried out with non-variable foreground stars observed simultaneously with the quasar. The quasar spectra are further decomposed into a continuum component and several broad emission lines to infer the variations of these spectral components. We find prominent microlensing events in the quasar images A and B, while images C and D are almost quiescent on a timescale of a few months. The strongest variations are observed in the continuum of image A. Their amplitude is larger in the blue (0.7 mag) than in the red (0.5 mag), consistent with microlensing of an accretion disk. Variations in the intensity and profile of the broad emission lines are also reported, most prominently in the wings of the CIII] and center of the CIV emission lines. During a strong microlensing episode observed in June 2006 in quasar image A, the broad component of the CIII] is more highly magnified than the narrow component. In addition, the emission lines with higher ionization potentials are more magnified than the lines with lower ionization potentials, consistent with the results obtained with reverberation mapping. Finally, we find that the V-band differential extinction by the lens, between the quasar images, is in the range 0.1-0.3 mag.
  • We present results from Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the mid-infrared phase variations of three short-period extrasolar planetary systems: HD 209458, HD 179949 and 51 Peg. We gathered IRAC images in multiple wavebands at eight phases of each planet's orbit. We find the uncertainty in relative photometry from one epoch to the next to be significantly larger than the photon counting error at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron. We are able to place 2-sigma upper limits of only 2% on the phase variations at these wavelengths. At 8 micron the epoch-to-epoch systematic uncertainty is comparable to the photon counting noise and we detect a phase function for HD 179949 which is in phase with the planet's orbit and with a relative peak-to-trough amplitude of 0.00141(33). Assuming that HD 179949b has a radius R_J < R_p < 1.2R_J, it must recirculate less than 21% of incident stellar energy to its night side at the 1-sigma level (where 50% signifies full recirculation). If the planet has a small Bond albedo, it must have a mass less than 2.4 M_J (1-sigma). We do not detect phase variations for the other two systems but we do place the following 2-sigma upper limits: 0.0007 for 51 Peg, and 0.0015 for HD 209458. Due to its edge-on configuration, the upper limit for HD 209458 translates, with appropriate assumptions about Bond albedo, into a lower limit on the recirculation occuring in the planet's atmosphere. HD 209458b must recirculate at least 32% of incident stellar energy to its night side, at the 1-sigma level, which is consistent with other constraints on recirculation from the depth of secondary eclipse depth at 8 micron and the low optical albedo. These data indicate that different Hot Jupiter planets may experience different recirculation efficiencies.
  • We present results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar H 1413+117. Our spatial and spectral analysis of a recent deep Chandra observation confirms a microlensing event in a previous Chandra observation performed about 5 years earlier. We present constraints on the structure of the accretion flow in H 1413+117 based on the time-scale of this microlensing event. Our analysis of the combined spectrum of all the images indicates the presence of two emission peaks at rest-frame energies of 5.35 keV and 6.32 keV detected at the > 98% and > 99% confidence levels, respectively. The double peaked Fe emission line is fit well with an accretion-disk line model, however, the best-fitting model parameters are neither well constrained nor unique. Additional observations are required to constrain the model parameters better and to confirm the relativistic interpretation of the double peaked Fe Kalpha line. Another possible interpretation of the Fe emission is fluorescent Fe emission from the back-side of the wind. The spectra of images C and D show significant high-energy broad absorption features that extend up to rest-frame energies of 9 keV and 15 keV respectively. We propose that a likely cause of these differences is significant variability of the outflow on time-scales that are shorter than the time-delays between the images. The Chandra observation of H 1413+117 has made possible for the first time the detection of the inner regions of the accretion disk and/or wind and the high ionization component of the outflowing wind of a LoBAL quasar.
  • The transits of a planet on a Keplerian orbit occur at time intervals exactly equal to the period of the orbit. If a second planet is introduced the orbit is not Keplerian and the transits are no longer exactly periodic. We compute the magnitude of these variations in the timing of the transits, dt. We investigate analytically several limiting cases: (i) interior perturbing planets with much smaller periods; (ii) exterior perturbing planets on eccentric orbits with much larger periods; (iii) both planets on circular orbits with arbitrary period ratio but not in resonance; and (iv) planets on initially circular orbits locked in resonance. Case (iv) is perhaps the most interesting case since some systems are known to be in resonances and the perturbations are the largest. As long as the perturber is more massive than the transiting planet, the timing variations would be of order of the period regardless of the perturber mass! For lighter perturbers, we show that the timing variations are smaller than the period by the perturber to transiting planet mass ratio. An earth mass planet in 2:1 resonance with a 3-day period transiting planet (e.g. HD 209458b) would cause timing variations of order 3 minutes, which would be accumulated over a year. These are easily detectable with current ground-based measurements. For the case of both planets on eccentric orbits, we compute numerically the transit timing variations for several cases of known multiplanet systems assuming they were edge-on. Transit timing measurements may be used to constrain the masses and radii of the planetary system and, when combined with radial velocity measurements, to break the degeneracy between mass and radius of the host star. (abstract truncated)
  • We present new results uncovered by a re-analysis of a Chandra observation of the gravitationally lensed, low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar H 1413+117. Previous analyses of the same Chandra observation led to the detection of a strong, redshifted Fe Kalpha line from the combined spectrum of all images. We show that the redshifted Fe Kalpha line is only significant in the brighter image A. The X-ray flux fraction of image A is larger by a factor of 1.55 +/- 0.17 than the optical R-band flux fraction, indicating that image A is significantly enhanced in the X-ray band. We also find that the Fe Kalpha line and the continuum are enhanced by different factors. A microlensing event could explain both the energy-dependent magnification and the significant detection of Fe Kalpha line emission in the spectrum of image A only. In the context of this interpretation we provide constraints on the spatial extent of the inferred scattered continuum and reprocessed Fe Kalpha line emission regions in a LoBAL quasar.
  • We present the observations of the gravitationally lensed system QSO 2237+0305 performed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory on 2000 Sept. 6, and on 2001 Dec. 8 for 30.3 ks and 9.5 ks, respectively. Imaging analysis resolves the four X-ray images of the Einstein Cross. A possible fifth image is detected; however, this detection less certain. Fits to the combined spectrum of all images of the Einstein Cross assuming a simple power law with Galactic and intervening absorption at the lensing galaxy yield a photon index of 1.90(+0.05,-0.05). For the first observation, this spectral model yields a 0.4-8.0 keV X-ray flux of 4.6e-13 erg cm-2 s-1 and a 0.4-8.0 keV lensed luminosity of 1.0e46 erg s-1. The source exhibits variability both over long and short time scales. The X-ray flux has dropped by 20% between the two observations, and the K-S test showed that image A is variable at the 97% confidence level within the first observation. Furthermore, a possible time-delay of 2.7(+0.5,-0.9) hours between images A and B with image A leading is detected in the first observation. The X-ray flux ratios of the images are consistent with the optical flux ratios which are affected by microlensing suggesting that the X-ray emission is also microlensed. A comparison between our measured column densities and those inferred from extinction measurements suggests a higher dust-to-gas ratio in the lensing galaxy than the average value of our Galaxy. Finally, we report the detection at the 99.99% confidence level of a broad emission feature near the redshifted energy of the Fe K\alpha line in only the spectrum of image A. The rest frame energy, width, and equivalent width of this feature are E = 5.7(+0.2,-0.3) keV, sigma = 0.87(+0.30,-0.15) keV, and EW = 1200(+300,-200) eV, respectively.
  • We use published mid-IR and V-band flux ratios for images A and B of Q2237+0305 to demonstrate that the size of the mid-IR emission region has a scale comparable to or larger than the microlens Einstein Radius (ER, ~10^17 cm for solar mass stars). Q2237+0305 has been monitored extensively in the R and V-bands for ~15 years. The variability record shows significant microlensing variability of the optical emission region, and has been used by several studies to demonstrate that the optical emission region is much smaller than the ER for solar-mass objects. For the majority of the monitoring history, the optical flux ratios have differed significantly from those predicted by macro-models. In contrast, recent observations in mid-IR show flux ratios similar to those measured in the radio, and to predictions of some lens models, implying that the mid-IR flux is emitted from a region that is at least 2 orders of magnitude larger than the optical emission region. We have calculated the likeli-hood of the observed mid-IR flux ratio as a function of mid-IR source size given the observed V-band flux ratio. The expected flux ratio for a source having dimensions of ~1 ER is a sensitive function of the macro model adopted. However we find that the probability of source size given the observed flux ratios is primarily sensitive to the ratio of the macro-model magnifications. The majority of published macro models for Q2237+0305 yield a flux ratio for images B and A of 0.8 - 1.1. By combining probabilities from the ratios A/B and C/D we infer that the diameter of a circular IR emission region is >1ER with >95% confidence. For microlensing by low-mass stars, this source size limit rules out non-thermal processes such as synchrotron as mechanisms for mid-IR emission.
  • Published parametric models of the Einstein Cross gravitational lens demonstrate that the image geometry can be reproduced by families of models. In particular, the slope of the mass-profile for the lens galaxy is unconstrained. However, recent models predict a dependence of image flux ratios on the slope of the mass profile. We use this dependence to constrain the mass profile by calculating the likelihood of the slope using published mid-IR flux ratios (including microlensing variability). We find that the galaxy is likely to be flatter than isothermal, and therefore that the mass-to-light ratio is decreasing in the inner kpc.
  • We present results from monitoring of the distant (z = 2.64), gravitationally lensed quasar MG J0414+0534 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. An Fe Ka line at 6.49 +/- 0.09 keV (rest-frame) with an equivalent width of ~ 190eV consistent with fluorescence from a cold medium is detected at the 99 percent confidence level in the spectrum of the brightest image A. During the last two observations of our monitoring program we detected a five-fold increase of the equivalent width of a narrow Fe Ka line in the spectrum of image B but not in the brighter image A whereas image C is too faint to resolve the line. The continuum emission component of image B did not follow the sudden enhancement of the iron line in the last two observations. We propose that the sudden increase in the iron line strength from ~ 190eV to 900eV only in image B can be explained with a caustic crossing due to microlensing that selectively enhances a strip of the line emission region of the accretion disk. The non-enhancement of the continuum emission in the spectrum of image B suggests that the continuum emission region is concentrated closer to the center of the accretion disk than the iron line emission region and the magnification caustic has not reached close enough to the former region to amplify it. A model of a caustic crossing event predicts discontinuities in the light-curve of the magnification and provides an upper limit of ~ 5 x 10^(-4) pc on the outer radius of the Fe Ka emission region. The non-detection of any relativistic or Doppler shifts of the iron line in the spectrum of image B implies that the magnification caustic for the last two observations was located at a radius greater than ~ 100 gravitational radii.
  • We extend our models of the vertical structure and emergent radiation field of accretion disks around supermassive black holes described in previous papers of this series. Our models now include both a self-consistent treatment of Compton scattering and the effects of continuum opacities of the most important metal species (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, Ni). With these new effects incorporated, we compute the predicted spectrum from black holes accreting at nearly the Eddington luminosity (L/L_Edd = 0.3) and central masses of 10^6, 10^7, and 10^8 M_sun. We also consider two values of the Shakura-Sunyaev alpha parameter, 0.1 and 0.01. Although it has little effect when M > 10^8 M_sun, Comptonization grows in importance as the central mass decreases and the central temperature rises. It generally produces an increase in temperature with height in the uppermost layers of hot atmospheres. Compared to models with coherent electron scattering, Comptonized models have enhanced EUV/soft X-ray emission, but they also have a more sharply declining spectrum at very high frequencies. Comptonization also smears the hydrogen and the He II Lyman edges. The effects of metals on the overall spectral energy distribution are smaller than the effects of Comptonization for these parameters. Compared to pure hydrogen-helium models, models with metal continuum opacities have reduced flux in the high frequency tail, except at the highest frequencies, where the flux is very low. Metal photoionization edges are not present in the overall disk-integrated model spectra. In addition to our new grid of models, we also present a simple analytic prescription for the vertical temperature structure of the disk in the presence of Comptonization, and show under what conditions a hot outer layer (a corona) is formed.
  • The central regions of the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 can be indirectly resolved on nano-arcsecond scales if viewed spectrophotometricly during a microlensing high magnification event (HME). Q2237+0305 is currently being monitored from the ground (eg. OGLE collaboration, Apache Point Observatory), with the goal, among others, of triggering ground and spacecraft based target of opportunity (TOO) observations of an HME. In this work we investigate the rate of change (trigger) in image brightness that signals an imminent HME and importantly, the separation between the trigger and the event peak. In addition, we produce colour dependent model light-curves by combining high-resolution microlensing simulations with a realistic model for a thermal accretion disc source. We make hypothetical target of opportunity spectroscopic observations using our determination of the appropriate trigger as a guide. We find that if the source spectrum varies with source radius, a 3 observation TOO program should be able to observe a microlensing change in the continuum slope following a light-curve trigger with a success rate of >80%.