• We present an analysis of a deep (1$\sigma$=13 $\mu$Jy) cosmological 1.2-mm continuum map based on ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. In the 1 arcmin$^2$ covered by ASPECS we detect nine sources at $>3.5\sigma$ significance at 1.2-mm. Our ALMA--selected sample has a median redshift of $z=1.6\pm0.4$, with only one galaxy detected at z$>$2 within the survey area. This value is significantly lower than that found in millimeter samples selected at a higher flux density cut-off and similar frequencies. Most galaxies have specific star formation rates similar to that of main sequence galaxies at the same epoch, and we find median values of stellar mass and star formation rates of $4.0\times10^{10}\ M_\odot$ and $\sim40~M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Using the dust emission as a tracer for the ISM mass, we derive depletion times that are typically longer than 300 Myr, and we find molecular gas fractions ranging from $\sim$0.1 to 1.0. As noted by previous studies, these values are lower than using CO--based ISM estimates by a factor $\sim$2. The 1\,mm number counts (corrected for fidelity and completeness) are in agreement with previous studies that were typically restricted to brighter sources. With our individual detections only, we recover $55\pm4\%$ of the extragalactic background light (EBL) at 1.2 mm measured by the Planck satellite, and we recover $80\pm7\%$ of this EBL if we include the bright end of the number counts and additional detections from stacking. The stacked contribution is dominated by galaxies at $z\sim1-2$, with stellar masses of (1-3)$\times$10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$. For the first time, we are able to characterize the population of galaxies that dominate the EBL at 1.2 mm.
  • We present a search for [CII] line and dust continuum emission from optical dropout galaxies at $z>6$ using ASPECS, our ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF). Our observations, which cover the frequency range $212-272$ GHz, encompass approximately the range $6<z<8$ for [CII] line emission and reach a limiting luminosity of L$_{\rm [CII]}\sim$(1.6-2.5)$\times$10$^{8}$ L$_{\odot}$. We identify fourteen [CII] line emitting candidates in this redshift range with significances $>$4.5 $\sigma$, two of which correspond to blind detections with no optical counterparts. At this significance level, our statistical analysis shows that about 60\% of our candidates are expected to be spurious. For one of our blindly selected [CII] line candidates, we tentatively detect the CO(6-5) line in our parallel 3-mm line scan. None of the line candidates are individually detected in the 1.2 mm continuum. A stack of all [CII] candidates results in a tentative detection with $S_{1.2mm}=14\pm5\mu$Jy. This implies a dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) of $(3\pm1)$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. We find that the two highest--SFR objects have candidate [CII] lines with luminosities that are consistent with the low-redshift $L_{\rm [CII]}$ vs. SFR relation. The other candidates have significantly higher [CII] luminosities than expected from their UV--based SFR. At the current sensitivity it is unclear whether the majority of these sources are intrinsically bright [CII] emitters, or spurious sources. If only one of our line candidates was real (a scenario greatly favored by our statistical analysis), we find a source density for [CII] emitters at $6<z<8$ that is significantly higher than predicted by current models and some extrapolations from galaxies in the local universe.
  • We present a molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) that covers the entire 3mm window (79-115 GHz) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our CO redshift coverage spans z<0.45, 1<z<1.9 and all z>2. We reach a CO detection limit that is deep enough to detect essentially all z>1 CO lines reported in the literature so far. We have developed and applied different line searching algorithms, resulting in the discovery of 17 line candidates. We estimate that the rate of false positive line detections is ~2/17. We identify optical/NIR counterparts from the deep ancillary database of the HDF-N for seven of these candidates and investigate their available SEDs. Two secure CO detections in our scan are identified with star-forming galaxies at z=1.784 and at z=2.047. These galaxies have colors consistent with the `BzK' color selection and they show relatively bright CO emission compared with galaxies of similar dust continuum luminosity. We also detect two spectral lines in the submillimeter galaxy HDF850.1 at z=5.183. We consider an additional 9 line candidates as high quality. Our observations also provide a deep 3mm continuum map (1-sigma noise level = 8.6 $\mu$Jy/beam). Via a stacking approach, we find that optical/MIR bright galaxies contribute only to <50% of the SFR density at 1<z<3, unless high dust temperatures are invoked. The present study represents a first, fundamental step towards an unbiased census of molecular gas in `normal' galaxies at high-z, a crucial goal of extragalactic astronomy in the ALMA era.
  • We present direct constraints on the CO luminosity function at high redshift and the resulting cosmic evolution of the molecular gas density, $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z), based on a blind molecular line scan in the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our line scan of the entire 3mm window (79-115 GHz) covers a cosmic volume of ~7000 Mpc$^3$, and redshift ranges z<0.45, 1.01<z<1.89 and z>2. We use the rich multiwavelength and spectroscopic database of the HDF-N to derive some of the best constraints on CO luminosities in high redshift galaxies to date. We combine the blind CO detections in our molecular line scan (presented in a companion paper) with stacked CO limits from galaxies with available spectroscopic redshifts (slit or mask spectroscopy from Keck and grism spectroscopy from HST) to give first blind constraints on high-z CO luminosity functions and the cosmic evolution of the H2 mass density $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) out to redshifts z~3. A comparison to empirical predictions of $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) shows that the securely detected sources in our molecular line scan already provide significant contributions to the predicted $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) in the redshift bins <z>~1.5 and <z>~2.7. Accounting for galaxies with CO luminosities that are not probed by our observations results in cosmic molecular gas densities $\rho_{\rm H2}$(z) that are higher than current predictions. We note however that the current uncertainties (in particular the luminosity limits, number of detections, as well as cosmic volume probed) are significant, a situation that is about to change with the emerging ALMA observatory.
  • We analyze the star-forming and structural properties of 45 massive (log(M/Msun)>10) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 2<z<3 to explore whether they are progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2. The optical/NIR and far-IR Spitzer/Herschel colors indicate that most compact SFGs are heavily obscured. Nearly half (47%) host an X-ray bright AGN. In contrast, only about 10% of other massive galaxies at that time host AGNs. Compact SFGs have centrally-concentrated light profiles and spheroidal morphologies similar to quiescent galaxies, and are thus strikingly different from other SFGs. Most compact SFGs lie either within the SFR-M main sequence (65%) or below (30%), on the expected evolutionary path towards quiescent galaxies. These results show conclusively that galaxies become more compact before they lose their gas and dust, quenching star formation. Using extensive HST photometry from CANDELS and grism spectroscopy from the 3D-HST survey, we model their stellar populations with either exponentially declining (tau) star formation histories (SFHs) or physically-motivated SFHs drawn from semi-analytic models (SAMs). SAMs predict longer formation timescales and older ages ~2 Gyr, which are nearly twice as old as the estimates of the tau models. While both models yield good SED fits, SAM SFHs better match the observed slope and zero point of the SFR-M main sequence. Some low-mass compact SFGs (log(M/Msun)=10-10.6) have younger ages but lower sSFRs than that of more massive galaxies, suggesting that the low-mass galaxies reach the red sequence faster. If the progenitors of compact SFGs are extended SFGs, state-of-the-art SAMs show that mergers and disk instabilities are both able to shrink galaxies, but disk instabilities are more frequent (60% versus 40%) and form more concentrated galaxies. We confirm this result via high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations.
  • The Hubble Deep Field (HDF) is a region in the sky that provides one of the deepest multi-wavelength views of the distant universe and has led to the detection of thousands of galaxies seen throughout cosmic time. An early map of the HDF at a wavelength of 850 microns that is sensitive to dust emission powered by star formation revealed the brightest source in the field, dubbed HDF850.1. For more than a decade, this source remained elusive and, despite significant efforts, no counterpart at shorter wavelengths, and thus no redshift, size or mass, could be identified. Here we report, using a millimeter wave molecular line scan, an unambiguous redshift determination for HDF850.1 of z=5.183. This places HDF850.1 in a galaxy overdensity at z~5.2 in the HDF, corresponding to a cosmic age of only 1.1 Gyr after the Big Bang. This redshift is significantly higher than earlier estimates and higher than most of the >100 sub-millimeter bright galaxies identified to date. The source has a star formation rate of 850 M_sun/yr and is spatially resolved on scales of 5 kpc, with an implied dynamical mass of ~1.3x10^11 M_sun, a significant fraction of which is present in the form of molecular gas. Despite our accurate redshift and position, a counterpart arising from starlight remains elusive.
  • The signal of isospin-asymmetric phase transition in the evolution of the chemical potential was observed for hot quasi-projectiles produced in the reactions 40,48Ca + 27Al confirming an analogous observation in the lighter system 28Si + 112,124Sn. With increasing mass, the properties of hot quasi-projectiles become increasingly influenced by the secondary emission. Thermodynamical observables exhibit no sensitivity to the different number of missing neutrons in the two reactions 40,48Ca + 27Al, thus providing a signal of dynamical emission of neutrons, which can be related to formation of a very neutron-rich low-density region (neck) between the projectile and target.
  • Edge-on spiral galaxies offer a unique perspective on disks. One can accurately determine the height distribution of stars and ISM and the line-of-sight integration allows for the study of faint structures. The Spitzer IRAC camera is an ideal instrument to study both the ISM and stellar structure in nearby galaxies; two of its channels trace the old stellar disk with little extinction and the 8 micron channel is dominated by the smallest dust grains (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, PAHs). Dalcanton et al. (2004) probed the link between the appearance of dust lanes and the disk stability. In a sample of bulge-less disks they show how in massive disks the ISM collapses into the characteristic thin dust lane. Less massive disks are gravitationally stable and their dust morphology is fractured. The transition occurs at 120 km/s for bulgeless disks. Here we report on our results of our Spitzer/IRAC survey of nearby edge-on spirals and its first results on the NIR Tully-Fischer relation, and ISM disk stability.
  • Edge-on spiral galaxies offer a unique perspective on disks. One can accurately determine the height distribution of stars and ISM and the line-of-sight integration allows for the study of faint structures. The Spitzer IRAC camera is an ideal instrument to study both the ISM and stellar structure in nearby galaxies; two of its channels trace the old stellar disk with little extinction and the 8 micron channel is dominated by the smallest dust grains (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, PAHs). Dalcanton et al. (2004) probed the link between the appearance of dust lanes and the disk stability. In a sample of bulge-less disks they show how in massive disks the ISM collapses into the characteristic thin dust lane. Less massive disks are gravitationally stable and their dust morphology is fractured. The transition occurs at 120 km/s for bulgeless disks. Here we report on our results of our Spitzer/IRAC survey of nearby edge-on spirals and its first results on the NIR Tully-Fischer relation, and ISM disk stability.
  • We present XMM data for the supercluster A901/2, at z ~ 0.17, which is combined with deep imaging and 17-band photometric redshifts (from the COMBO-17 survey), 2dF spectra and Spitzer 24um data, to identify AGN in the supercluster. The 90ksec XMM image contains 139 point sources, of which 11 are identified as supercluster AGN with L_X(0.5-7.5keV) > 1.7x10^41 erg/cm2/s. The host galaxies have M_R < -20 and only 2 of 8 sources with spectra could have been identified as AGN by the detected optical emission lines. Using a large sample of 795 supercluster galaxies we define control samples of massive galaxies with no detected AGN. The local environments of the AGN and control samples differ at >98 per cent significance. The AGN host galaxies lie predominantly in areas of moderate projected galaxy density and with more local blue galaxies than the control sample, with the exception of one very bright Type I AGN very near the centre of a cluster. These environments are similar to, but not limited to, cluster outskirts and blue groups. Despite the large number of potential host galaxies, no AGN are found in regions with the highest galaxy density (excluding some cluster cores where emission from the ICM obscures moderate luminosity AGN). AGN are also absent from the areas with lowest galaxy density. We conclude that the prevalence of cluster AGN is linked to their environment.
  • Simultaneous measurement of both neutrons and charged particles emitted in the reaction $^{64}$Zn + $^{64}$Zn at 45 MeV/nucleon allows comparison of the neutron to proton ratio at midrapidity with that at projectile rapidity. The evolution of N/Z in both rapidity regimes with increasing centrality is examined. For the completely re-constructed midrapidity material one finds that the neutron-to-proton ratio is above that of the overall $^{64}$Zn + $^{64}$Zn system. In contrast, the re-constructed ratio for the quasiprojectile is below that of the overall system. This difference provides the most complete evidence to date of neutron enrichment of midrapidity nuclear matter at the expense of the quasiprojectile.
  • We show that the large sequential decay corrections obtained by Ono {\it et al} [nucl-ex/0507018], is in contradiction with both the other dynamical and statistical model calculations carried out for the same systems and energy. On the other hand, the conclusion of Shetty {\it {et al.}} $[$Phys. Rev. C 70, 011601R (2004)$]$, that the experimental data favors Gogny$-$AS interaction (obtained assuming a significantly smaller sequential decay effects), is consistent with several other independent studies.
  • The isoscaling properties of isotopically resolved projectile residues from peripheral collisions of 86Kr (25 MeV/nucleon), 64Ni (25 MeV/nucleon) and 136Xe (20 MeV/nucleon) beams on various target pairs are employed to probe the symmetry energy coefficient of the nuclear binding energy. The present study focuses on heavy projectile fragments produced in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions near the onset of multifragment emission E*/A = 2-3 MeV). For these fragments, the measured average velocities are used to extract excitation energies. The excitation energies, in turn, are used to estimate the temperatures of the fragmenting quasiprojectiles in the framework the Fermi gas model. The isoscaling analysis of the fragment yields provided the isoscaling parameters "alpha" which, in combination with temperatures and isospin asymmetries provided the symmetry energy coefficient of the nuclear binding energy of the hot fragmenting quasiprojectiles. The extracted values of the symmetry energy coefficient at this excitation energy range (2-3 MeV/nucleon) are lower than the typical liquid-drop model value ~25 MeV corresponding to ground-state nuclei and show a monotonic decrease with increasing excitation energy. This result is of importance in the formation of hot nuclei in heavy-ion reactions and in hot stellar environments such as supernova.
  • The isotopic properties of the primary and secondary fragment yield distribution in the multifragmentation of $^{58}$Fe + $^{58}$Ni and $^{58}$Fe + $^{58}$Fe reactions are studied with respect to the $^{58}$Ni + $^{58}$Ni reaction at 30, 40 and 47 MeV/nucleon. The reduced neutron and proton densities from the observed fragment yield distribution show primary fragment yield distribution to undergo strongly secondary de-excitations. The effect is small at the lowest excitation energy and smallest neutron-to-proton ratio and becomes large at higher excitation energies and higher neutron-to-proton ratio. The symmetry energy of the primary fragments deduced from the reduced neutron density is significantly lower than that for the normal nuclei at saturation density, indicating that the fragments are highly excited and formed at a reduced density. Furthermore, the symmetry energy is also observed to decrease slowly with increasing excitation energy. The observed effect is explained using the statistical multifragmentation model.
  • As a step towards our understanding of galaxy evolution and for testing predictions of cosmological models we started a survey for galaxy clusters intending to identify candidates out to redshifts of ~1.5: HIROCS (= Heidelberg InfraRed/Optical Cluster Survey) is a multi-color survey (B, R, i, z and H) covering 11 square degrees in four fields on the sky. Our survey aims at a 5sigma detection of an L*+1 elliptical galaxy at z = 1.5. Classification of all objects and determination of photometric redshifts is done by the multi-color-classification scheme developed for the CADIS and COMBO-17 surveys. Cluster identification will be done by identifying overdensities in 3D-space (RA, DEC, zphot). First tests of our cluster finding algorithm on fields observed within CADIS and COMBO-17 revealed several cluster candidates.
  • The isoscaling parameter $\alpha$, from the fragments produced in the multifragmentation of $^{58}$Ni + $^{58}$Ni, $^{58}$Fe + $^{58}$Ni and $^{58}$Fe + $^{58}$Fe reactions at 30, 40 and 47 MeV/nucleon, was compared with that predicted by the antisymmetrized molecular dynamic (AMD) calculation based on two different nucleon-nucleon effective forces, namely the Gogny and Gogny-AS interaction. The results show that the data agrees better with the choice of Gogny-AS effective interaction, resulting in a symmetry energy of $\sim$ 18-20 MeV. The observed value indicate that the fragments are formed at a reduced density of $\sim$ 0.08 fm$^{-3}$.
  • A novel method was developed for the extraction of short emission times of light particles from the projectile-like fragments in peripheral deep-inelastic collisions in the Fermi energy domain. We have taken an advantage of the fact that in the external Coulomb field particles are evaporated asymmetrically. It was possible to determine the emission times in the interval 50-500 fm/c using the backward emission anisotropy of alpha-particles relative to the largest residue, in the reaction 28Si + 112Sn at 50 MeV/nucleon. The extracted times are consistent with predictions based on the evaporation decay widths calculated with the statistical evaporation model generalized for the case of the Coulomb interaction with the target.