• We obtained an optical spectrum of a star we identify as the optical counterpart of the M31 Chandra source CXO J004318.8+412016, because of prominent emission lines of the Balmer series, of neutral helium, and a He II line at 4686 Angstrom. The continuum energy distribution and the spectral characteristics demonstrate the presence of a red giant of K or earlier spectral type, so we concluded that the binary is likely to be a symbiotic system. CXO J004318.8+412016 has been observed in X-rays as a luminous supersoft source (SSS) since 1979, with effective temperature exceeding 40 eV and variable X-ray luminosity, oscillating between a few times 10(35) erg/s and a few times 10(37) erg/s. The optical, infrared and ultraviolet colors of the optical object are consistent with an an accretion disk around a compact object companion, which may either be a white dwarf, or a black hole, depending on the system parameters. If the origin of the luminous supersoft X-rays is the atmosphere of a white dwarf that is burning hydrogen in shell, it is as hot and luminous as post-thermonuclear flash novae, yet no major optical outburst has ever been observed, suggesting that the white dwarf is very massive (m>1.2 M(sol)) and it is accreting and burning at the high rate (mdot>10(-8)M(sol)/year) expected for type Ia supernovae progenitors. In this case, the X-ray variability may be due to a very short recurrence time of only mildly degenerate thermonuclear flashes.
  • We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD), in which convection is treated according to the novel scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. (2014). The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few percent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients of the ambient and of the convective element, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the "calibrated" MT theory for main sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, one which is simpler and more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.
  • In this paper we explore the possibility that isolated CO-WDs with mass smaller than the Chandrasekhar limit may undergo nuclear runaway and SNa explosion, triggered by the energy produced by under-barrier pycno-nuclear reactions between carbon and light elements. Such reactions would be due to left over impurities of the light elements, which would remain inactive until the WDs transit from the liquid to the solid state. We devise a simple formulation for the coulombian potential and the local density in a ionic lattice affected by impurities and introduce it in the known rates of pycno-nuclear reactions for multi-component plasmas. Our semi-analytical results indicate that the energy generated by these pycno-nuclear reactions exceeds the WD luminosity and provides enough energy to elementary cells of matter to balance the energy cost for C-ignition at much younger ages than the age of the Universe, even for WDs with masses as low as $\simeq 0.85\, M_\odot$. A thermonuclear runaway may thus be triggered in isolated WDs. The explosion would occur from few hundred thousand to a few million years after the WD formation in the mass interval $0.85 - 1.2\, M_\odot$.
  • In this paper we present a study and comparison of the star formation rates (SFR) in the fields around NGC 1898 and NGC 2154, two intermediate-age star clusters located in very different regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud. We also present a photometric study of NGC 1898, and of seven minor clusters which happen to fall in the field of NGC 1898, for which basic parameters were so far unknown. We do not focus on NGC 2154, because this cluster was already investigated in Baume et al. 2007, using the same theoretical tools. The ages of the clusters were derived by means of the isochrone fitting method on their $clean$ color-magnitude diagrams. Two distinct populations of clusters were found: one cluster (NGC 2154) has a mean age of 1.7 Gyr, with indication of extended star formation over roughly a 1 Gyr period, while all the others have ages between 100 and 200 Myr. The SFRs of the adjacent fields were inferred using the downhill-simplex algorithm. Both SFRs show enhancements at 200, 400, 800 Myr, and at 1, 6, and 8 Gyr. These bursts in the SFR are probably the result of dynamical interactions between the Magellanic Clouds (MCs), and of the MCs with the Milky Way.
  • In this paper we discuss the cluster and field star formation in the central part of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The main goal is to study the correlation between young objects and their interstellar environment. The ages of about 164 associations and 311 clusters younger than 1 Gyr are determined using isochrone fitting. The spatial distribution of the clusters is compared with the HI maps, with the HI velocity dispersion field, with the location of the CO clouds and with the distribution of young field stars. The cluster age distribution supports the idea that clusters formed in the last 1 Gyr of the SMC history in a roughly continuous way with periods of enhancements. The two super-shells 37A and 304A detected in the HI distribution are clearly visible in the age distribution of the clusters: an enhancement in the cluster formation rate has taken place from the epoch of the shell formation. A tight correlation between young clusters and the HI intensity is found. The degree of correlation is decreasing with the age of the clusters. Clusters older than 300 Myr are located away from the HI peaks. Clusters and associations younger than 10 Myr are related to the CO clouds in the SW region of the SMC disk. A positive correlation between the location of the young clusters and the velocity dispersion field of the atomic gas is derived only for the shell 304A, suggesting that the cloud-cloud collision is probably not the most important mechanism of cluster formation. Evidence of gravitational triggered episode due to the most recent close interaction between SMC and LMC is found both in the cluster and field star distribution.