• The Polarized Instrument for Long-wavelengthObservation of the Tenuous interstellar medium (PILOT) is a balloon-borne experiment aiming at measuring the polarized emission of thermal dust at a wavelength of 240 mm(1.2 THz). A first PILOT flight (flight#1) of the experiment took place from Timmins, Ontario, Canada, in September 2015 and a second flight (flight#2) took place from Alice Springs, Australia in april 2017. In this paper, we present the inflight performance of the instrument during these two flights. We concentrate on performances during flight#2, but allude to flight#1 performances if significantly different.We first present a short description of the instrument and the flights. We determine the time constants of our detectors combining inflight information from the signal decay following high energy particle impacts (glitches) and of our internal calibration source. We use these time constants to deconvolve the data timelines and analyse the optical quality of the instrument as measured on planets. We then analyse the structure and polarization of the instrumental background. We measure the detector response flat field and its time variations using the signal from the residual atmosphere and of our internal calibration source. Finally, we analyze the detector noise spectral and temporal properties. The in-flight performances are found to be satisfactory and globally in line with expectations from ground calibrations. We conclude by assessing the expected in-flight sensitivity of the instrument in light of the above in-flight performances.
  • Context: Exoplanet science has made staggering progress in the last two decades, due to the relentless exploration of new detection methods and refinement of existing ones. Yet astrometry offers a unique and untapped potential of discovery of habitable-zone low-mass planets around all the solar-like stars of the solar neighborhood. To fulfill this goal, astrometry must be paired with high precision calibration of the detector. Aims: We present a way to calibrate a detector for high accuracy astrometry. An experimental testbed combining an astrometric simulator and an interferometric calibration system is used to validate both the hardware needed for the calibration and the signal processing methods. The objective is an accuracy of 5e-6 pixel on the location of a Nyquist sampled polychromatic point spread function. Methods: The interferometric calibration system produced modulated Young fringes on the detector. The Young fringes were parametrized as products of time and space dependent functions, based on various pixel parameters. The minimization of func- tion parameters was done iteratively, until convergence was obtained, revealing the pixel information needed for the calibration of astrometric measurements. Results: The calibration system yielded the pixel positions to an accuracy estimated at 4e-4 pixel. After including the pixel position information, an astrometric accuracy of 6e-5 pixel was obtained, for a PSF motion over more than five pixels. In the static mode (small jitter motion of less than 1e-3 pixel), a photon noise limited precision of 3e-5 pixel was reached.
  • Theia is an astrometric mission proposed to ESA in 2014 for which one of the scientific objectives is detecting Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby solar-type stars. This objective requires the capability to measure stellar centroids at the precision of 1e-5 pixel. Current state-of-the-art methods for centroid estimation have reached a precision of about 3e-5 pixel at two times Nyquist sampling, this was shown at the JPL by the VESTA experiment. A metrology system was used to calibrate intra and inter pixel quantum efficiency variations in order to correct pixelation errors. The Theia consortium is operating a testbed in vacuum in order to achieve 1e-5 pixel precision for the centroid estimation. The goal is to provide a proof of concept for the precision requirement of the Theia spacecraft. The testbed consists of two main sub-systems. The first one produces pseudo stars: a blackbody source is fed into a large core fiber and lights-up a pinhole mask in the object plane, which is imaged by a mirror on the CCD. The second sub-system is the metrology, it projects young fringes on the CCD. The fringes are created by two single mode fibers facing the CCD and fixed on the mirror. In this paper we present the latest experiments conducted and the results obtained after a series of upgrades on the testbed was completed. The calibration system yielded the pixel positions to an accuracy estimated at 4e-4 pixel. After including the pixel position information, an astrometric accuracy of 6e-5 pixel was obtained, for a PSF motion over more than 5 pixels. In the static mode (small jitter motion of less than 1e-3 pixel), a photon noise limited precision of 3e-5 pixel was reached.
  • Herschel observations of nearby molecular clouds suggest that interstellar filaments and prestellar cores represent two fundamental steps in the star formation process. The observations support a picture of low-mass star formation according to which ~ 0.1 pc-wide filaments form first in the cold interstellar medium, probably as a result of large-scale compression of interstellar matter by supersonic turbulent flows, and then prestellar cores arise from gravitational fragmentation of the densest filaments. Whether this scenario also applies to regions of high-mass star formation is an open question, in part because Herschel data cannot resolve the inner width of filaments in the nearest regions of massive star formation. We used the bolometer camera ArTeMiS on the APEX telescope to map the central part of the NGC6334 complex at a factor of > 3 higher resolution than Herschel at 350 microns. Combining ArTeMiS data with Herschel data allowed us to study the structure of the main filament of the complex with a resolution of 8" or < 0.07 pc at d ~ 1.7 kpc. Our study confirms that this filament is a very dense, massive linear structure with a line mass ranging from ~ 500 Msun/pc to ~ 2000 Msun/pc over nearly 10 pc. It also demonstrates that its inner width remains as narrow as W ~ 0.15 +- 0.05 pc all along the filament length, within a factor of < 2 of the characteristic 0.1 pc value found with Herschel for lower-mass filaments in the Gould Belt. While it is not completely clear whether the NGC 6334 filament will form massive stars or not in the future, it is two to three orders of magnitude denser than the majority of filaments observed in Gould Belt clouds, and yet has a very similar inner width. This points to a common physical mechanism for setting the filament width and suggests that some important structural properties of nearby clouds also hold in high-mass star forming regions.
  • NEAT is an astrometric mission proposed to ESA with the objectives of detecting Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby solar-type stars. NEAT requires the capability to measure stellar centroids at the precision of 5e-6 pixel. Current state-of-the-art methods for centroid estimation have reached a precision of about 2e-5 pixel at two times Nyquist sampling, this was shown at the JPL by the VESTA experiment. A metrology system was used to calibrate intra and inter pixel quantum efficiency variations in order to correct pixelation errors. The European part of the NEAT consortium is building a testbed in vacuum in order to achieve 5e-6 pixel precision for the centroid estimation. The goal is to provide a proof of concept for the precision requirement of the NEAT spacecraft. The testbed consists of two main sub-systems. The first one produces pseudo stars: a blackbody source is fed into a large core fiber and lights-up a pinhole mask in the object plane, which is imaged by a mirror on the CCD. The second sub-system is the metrology, it projects young fringes on the CCD. The fringes are created by two single mode fibers facing the CCD and fixed on the mirror. In this paper we present the experiments conducted and the results obtained since July 2013 when we had the first light on both the metrology and pseudo stars. We explain the data reduction procedures we used.
  • NEAT is an astrometric mission proposed to ESA with the objectives of detecting Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby solar-type stars. NEAT requires the capability to measure stellar centroids at the precision of 5e-6 pixel. Current state-of-the-art methods for centroid estimation have reached a precision of about 2e-5 pixel at two times Nyquist sampling, this was shown at the JPL by the VESTA experiment. A metrology system was used to calibrate intra and inter pixel quantum efficiency variations in order to correct pixelation errors. The European part of the NEAT consortium is building a testbed in vacuum in order to achieve 5e-6 pixel precision for the centroid estimation. The goal is to provide a proof of concept for the precision requirement of the NEAT spacecraft. In this paper we present the metrology and the pseudo stellar sources sub-systems, we present a performance model and an error budget of the experiment and we report the present status of the demonstration. Finally we also present our first results: the experiment had its first light in July 2013 and a first set of data was taken in air. The analysis of this first set of data showed that we can already measure the pixel positions with an accuracy of about 1e-4 pixel.
  • We present APEX/P-ArT\'eMiS 450\mu m continuum observations of RCW 36 and the adjacent ridge, a high-mass high-column density filamentary structure at the centre of the Vela C molecular cloud. These observations, at higher resolution than Herschel's SPIRE camera, reveal clear fragmentation of the central star-forming ridge. Combined with PACS far-infrared and SPIRE sub-millimetre observations from the Herschel HOBYS project we build a high resolution column density map of the region mapped with P-ArT\'eMiS. We extract the radial density profile of the Vela C ridge which with a ~ 0.1pc central width is consistent with that measured for low-mass star-forming filaments in the Herschel Gould Belt survey. Direct comparison with Serpens South, of the Gould Belt Aquila complex, reveals many similarities between the two regions. Despite likely different formation mechanisms and histories, the Vela C ridge and Serpens South filament share common characteristics, including their filament central widths.
  • A new concept of bolometer arrays is used for the imager of PACS, one of the three instruments aboard the future Herschel space observatory. Within the framework of PACS photometer characterization, irradiation tests were performed on a dedicated bolometer array in order to study long-term and short-term radiation effects. The main objective was to study particles impacts on the detectors applicable to future observations in orbit and possible hard and/or soft curing to restore its performances. Cobalt-60 gamma ray irradiations did not show significant degradation, so we mainly focused on single events effects (SEE). Protons and alphas irradiations were then performed at the Van de Graaf tandem accelerator at the Institut de Physique Nucleaire (IPN, Orsay, France), respectively at 20MeV and 30MeV. Observation showed that the shape of signal perturbations clearly depends on the location of the impacts either on the detector itself or the read-out circuit. Software curing has then to be anticipated in order to deglitch the signal. This test gives also a unique opportunity to measure some parameters of the detector: electrical crosstalk and thermo- electrical time constant. However a detailed bolometer model is necessary to understand the contribution of the thermal response in relation with the electrical response. It will be the second step of our study. Finally the complete radiation evaluation proved that this detector can be used in spatial experiments.
  • The Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) is one of the three science instruments on ESA's far infrared and submillimetre observatory. It employs two Ge:Ga photoconductor arrays (stressed and unstressed) with 16x25 pixels, each, and two filled silicon bolometer arrays with 16x32 and 32x64 pixels, respectively, to perform integral-field spectroscopy and imaging photometry in the 60-210\mu\ m wavelength regime. In photometry mode, it simultaneously images two bands, 60-85\mu\ m or 85-125\mu\m and 125-210\mu\ m, over a field of view of ~1.75'x3.5', with close to Nyquist beam sampling in each band. In spectroscopy mode, it images a field of 47"x47", resolved into 5x5 pixels, with an instantaneous spectral coverage of ~1500km/s and a spectral resolution of ~175km/s. We summarise the design of the instrument, describe observing modes, calibration, and data analysis methods, and present our current assessment of the in-orbit performance of the instrument based on the Performance Verification tests. PACS is fully operational, and the achieved performance is close to or better than the pre-launch predictions.
  • Context: The earliest phases of massive star formation are currently much debated. Aims. In an effort to make progress, we took a census of Class0-like protostellar dense cores in the NGC 3576 region, one of the nearest and most luminous embedded sites of high-mass star formation in the Galaxy. Methods: We used the P-ArTeMiS bolometer camera on the APEX telescope to produce the first 450-micron dust continuum map of the filamentary dense clump associated with NGC 3576. Results: Combining our 450-micron observations with existing data at other wavelengths, we have identified seven massive protostellar sources along the NGC 3576 filament and placed them in the M_env - L_bol evolutionary diagram for protostars. Conclusions: Comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks suggests that these seven protostellar sources will evolve into massive stars with masses M* ~ 15-50 Msun. Four sources are classified as candidate high-mass Class 0 objects, two sources as massive Class I objects, and one source appears to be at an intermediate stage.