• The main characteristics in the radio continuum spectra of Supernova Remnants (SNRs) result from simple synchrotron emission. In addition, electron acceleration mechanisms can shape the spectra in specific ways, especially at high radio frequencies. These features are connected to the age and the peculiar conditions of the local interstellar medium interacting with the SNR. Whereas the bulk radio emission is expected at up to $20-50$ GHz, sensitive high-resolution images of SNRs above 10 GHz are lacking and are not easily achievable, especially in the confused regions of the Galactic Plane. In the framework of the early science observations with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in February-March 2016, we obtained high-resolution images of SNRs Tycho, W44 and IC443 that provided accurate integrated flux density measurements at 21.4 GHz: 8.8 $\pm$ 0.9 Jy for Tycho, 25 $\pm$ 3 Jy for W44 and 66 $\pm$ 7 Jy for IC443. We coupled the SRT measurements with radio data available in the literature in order to characterise the integrated and spatially-resolved spectra of these SNRs, and to find significant frequency- and region-dependent spectral slope variations. For the first time, we provide direct evidence of a spectral break in the radio spectral energy distribution of W44 at an exponential cutoff frequency of 15 $\pm$ 2 GHz. This result constrains the maximum energy of the accelerated electrons in the range $6-13$ GeV, in agreement with predictions indirectly derived from AGILE and \textit{Fermi}-LAT gamma-ray observations. With regard to IC443, our results confirm the noticeable presence of a bump in the integrated spectrum around $20-70$ GHz that could result from a spinning dust emission mechanism.
  • In September 2016, the microquasar Cygnus X-3 underwent a giant radio flare, which was monitored for 6 days with the Medicina Radio Astronomical Station and the Sardinia Radio Telescope. Long observations were performed in order to follow the evolution of the flare on a hourly scale, covering six frequency ranges from 1.5 GHz to 25.6 GHz. The radio emission reached a maximum of 13.2 +/- 0.7 Jy at 7.2 GHz and 10 +/- 1 Jy at 18.6 GHz. Rapid flux variations were observed at high radio frequencies at the peak of the flare, together with rapid evolution of the spectral index: alpha steepened from 0.3 to 0.6 within 5 hours. This is the first time that such fast variations are observed, giving support to the evolution from optically thick to optically thin plasmons in expansion moving outward from the core. Based on the Italian network (Noto, Medicina and SRT) and extended to the European antennas (Torun, Yebes, Onsala), VLBI observations were triggered at 22 GHz on five different occasions, four times prior to the giant flare, and once during its decay phase. Flux variations of 2-hour duration were recorded during the first session. They correspond to a mini-flare that occurred close to the core ten days before the onset of the giant flare. From the latest VLBI observation we infer that four days after the flare peak the jet emission was extended over 30 mas.
  • Observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) are a powerful tool for investigating the later stages of stellar evolution, the properties of the ambient interstellar medium, and the physics of particle acceleration and shocks. For a fraction of SNRs, multi-wavelength coverage from radio to ultra high-energies has been provided, constraining their contributions to the production of Galactic cosmic rays. Although radio emission is the most common identifier of SNRs and a prime probe for refining models, high-resolution images at frequencies above 5 GHz are surprisingly lacking, even for bright and well-known SNRs such as IC443 and W44. In the frameworks of the Astronomical Validation and Early Science Program with the 64-m single-dish Sardinia Radio Telescope, we provided, for the first time, single-dish deep imaging at 7 GHz of the IC443 and W44 complexes coupled with spatially-resolved spectra in the 1.5-7 GHz frequency range. Our images were obtained through on-the-fly mapping techniques, providing antenna beam oversampling and resulting in accurate continuum flux density measurements. The integrated flux densities associated with IC443 are S_1.5GHz = 134 +/- 4 Jy and S_7GHz = 67 +/- 3 Jy. For W44, we measured total flux densities of S_1.5GHz = 214 +/- 6 Jy and S_7GHz = 94 +/- 4 Jy. Spectral index maps provide evidence of a wide physical parameter scatter among different SNR regions: a flat spectrum is observed from the brightest SNR regions at the shock, while steeper spectral indices (up to 0.7) are observed in fainter cooling regions, disentangling in this way different populations and spectra of radio/gamma-ray-emitting electrons in these SNRs.
  • [Abridged] The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) is the new 64-m dish operated by INAF (Italy). Its active surface will allow us to observe at frequencies of up to 116 GHz. At the moment, three receivers, one per focal position, have been installed and tested. The SRT was officially opened in October 2013, upon completion of its technical commissioning phase. In this paper, we provide an overview of the main science drivers for the SRT, describe the main outcomes from the scientific commissioning of the telescope, and discuss a set of observations demonstrating the SRT's scientific capabilities. One of the main objectives of scientific commissioning was the identification of deficiencies in the instrumentation and/or in the telescope sub-systems for further optimization. As a result, the overall telescope performance has been significantly improved. As part of the scientific commissioning activities, different observing modes were tested and validated, and first astronomical observations were carried out to demonstrate the science capabilities of the SRT. In addition, we developed astronomer-oriented software tools, to support future observers on-site. The astronomical validation activities were prioritized based on technical readiness and scientific impact. The highest priority was to make the SRT available for joint observations as part of European networks. As a result, the SRT started to participate (in shared-risk mode) in EVN (European VLBI Network) and LEAP (Large European Array for Pulsars) observing sessions in early 2014. The validation of single-dish operations for the suite of SRT first light receivers and backends continued in the following years, and was concluded with the first call for shared-risk/early-science observations issued at the end of 2015.
  • We report on the spectral and timing properties of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J00291+5934 observed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR during its 2015 outburst. The source is in a hard state dominated at high energies by a comptonization of soft photons ($\sim0.9$ keV) by an electron population with kT$_e\sim30$ keV, and at lower energies by a blackbody component with kT$\sim0.5$ keV. A moderately broad, neutral Fe emission line and four narrow absorption lines are also found. By investigating the pulse phase evolution, we derived the best-fitting orbital solution for the 2015 outburst. Comparing the updated ephemeris with those of the previous outbursts, we set a $3\sigma$ confidence level interval $-6.6\times 10^{-13}$ s/s $< \dot{P}_{orb} < 6.5 \times 10^{-13}$ s/s on the orbital period derivative. Moreover, we investigated the pulse profile dependence on energy finding a peculiar behaviour of the pulse fractional amplitude and lags as a function of energy. We performed a phase-resolved spectroscopy showing that the blackbody component tracks remarkably well the pulse-profile, indicating that this component resides at the neutron star surface (hot-spot).
  • In the frame of the Astronomical Validation activities for the 64m Sardinia Radio Telescope, we performed 5-22 GHz imaging observations of the complex-morphology supernova remnants (SNRs) W44 and IC443. We adopted innovative observing and mapping techniques providing unprecedented accuracy for single-dish imaging of SNRs at these frequencies, revealing morphological details typically available only at lower frequencies through interferometry observations. High-frequency studies of SNRs in the radio range are useful to better characterize the spatially-resolved spectra and the physical parameters of different regions of the SNRs interacting with the ISM. Furthermore, synchrotron-emitting electrons in the high-frequency radio band are also responsible for the observed high-energy phenomenology as -e.g.- Inverse Compton and bremsstrahlung emission components observed in gamma-rays, to be disentangled from hadron emission contribution (providing constraints on the origin of cosmic rays).
  • A background of nanohertz gravitational waves from supermassive black hole binaries could soon be detected by pulsar timing arrays, which measure the times-of-arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars with very high precision. The European Pulsar Timing Array uses five large European radio telescopes to monitor high-precision millisecond pulsars, imposing in this way strong constraints on a gravitational wave background. To achieve the necessary precision needed to detect gravitational waves, the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) performs simultaneous observations of pulsars with all five telescopes, which allows us to coherently add the radio pulses, maximize the signal-to-noise of pulsar signals and increase the precision of times-of-arrival. We report on the progress made and results obtained by the LEAP collaboration, and in particular on the addition of the Sardinia Radio Telescope to the LEAP observations during its scientific validation phase. In addition, we discuss how LEAP can be used to monitor strong-gravity systems such as double neutron star systems and impose strong constraints on post-keplerian parameters.
  • We present new observations of the galaxy cluster 3C 129 obtained with the Sardinia Radio Telescope in the frequency range 6000-7200 MHz, with the aim to image the large-angular-scale emission at high-frequency of the radio sources located in this cluster of galaxies. The data were acquired using the recently-commissioned ROACH2-based backend to produce full-Stokes image cubes of an area of 1 deg x 1 deg centered on the radio source 3C 129. We modeled and deconvolved the telescope beam pattern from the data. We also measured the instrumental polarization beam patterns to correct the polarization images for off-axis instrumental polarization. Total intensity images at an angular resolution of 2.9 arcmin were obtained for the tailed radio galaxy 3C 129 and for 13 more sources in the field, including 3C 129.1 at the galaxy cluster center. These data were used, in combination with literature data at lower frequencies, to derive the variation of the synchrotron spectrum of 3C 129 along the tail of the radio source. If the magnetic field is at the equipartition value, we showed that the lifetimes of radiating electrons result in a radiative age for 3C 129 of t_syn = 267 +/- 26 Myrs. Assuming a linear projected length of 488 kpc for the tail, we deduced that 3C 129 is moving supersonically with a Mach number of M=v_gal/c_s=1.47. Linearly polarized emission was clearly detected for both 3C 129 and 3C 129.1. The linear polarization measured for 3C 129 reaches levels as high as 70% in the faintest region of the source where the magnetic field is aligned with the direction of the tail.
  • 4U 1705-44 is one of the most-studied type I X-ray burster and Atoll sources. This source represents a perfect candidate to test different models proposed to self-consistently track the physical changes occurring between different spectral states because it shows clear spectral state transitions. The broadband coverage, the sensitivity and energy resolution of the BeppoSAX satellite offers the opportunity to disentangle the components that form the total X-ray spectrum and to study their changes according to the spectral state. Using two BeppoSAX observations carried out in August and October 2000, respectively, for a total effective exposure time of about 100 ks, we study the spectral evolution of the source from a soft to hard state. Energy spectra are selected according to the source position in the color-color diagram (CCD) Results. We succeeded in modeling the spectra of the source using a physical self-consistent scenario for both the island and banana branches (the double Comptonization scenario). The components observed are the soft Comptonization and hard Comptonization, the blackbody, and a reflection component with a broad iron line. When the source moves from the banana state to the island state, the parameters of the two Comptonization components change significantly and the blackbody component becomes too weak to be detected. We interpret the soft Comptonization component as emission from the hot plasma surrounding the neutron star, hard Comptonization as emission from the disk region, and the blackbody component as emission from the inner accretion disk. The broad feature in the iron line region is compatible with reflection from the inner accretion disk.
  • Multi-messenger astronomy is becoming the key to understanding the Universe from a comprehensive perspective. In most cases, the data and the technology are already in place, therefore it is important to provide an easily-accessible package that combines datasets from multiple telescopes at different wavelengths. In order to achieve this, we are working to produce a data analysis pipeline that allows the data reduction from different instruments without needing detailed knowledge of each observation. Ideally, the specifics of each observation are automatically dealt with, while the necessary information on how to handle the data in each case is provided by a tutorial that is included in the program. We first focus our project on the study of pulsars and their wind nebulae (PWNe) at radio and gamma-ray frequencies. In this way, we aim to combine time-domain and imaging datasets at two extremes of the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the emission has the same non-thermal origin in pulsars at radio and gamma-ray frequencies, and the population of electrons is believed to be the same at these energies in PWNe. The final goal of the project will be to unveil the properties of these objects by tracking their behaviour using all of the available multi-wavelength data.
  • Iron emission lines at 6.4-6.97 keV, identified with Kalpha radiative transitions, are among the strongest discrete features in the X-ray band. These are one of the most powerful probes to infer the properties of the plasma in the innermost part of the accretion disk around a compact object. In this paper we present a recent Suzaku observation, 100-ks effective exposure, of the atoll source and X-ray burster 4U 1705-44, where we clearly detect signatures of a reflection component which is distorted by the high-velocity motion in the accretion disk. The reflection component consists of a broad iron line at about 6.4 keV and a Compton bump at high X-ray energies, around 20 keV. All these features are consistently fitted with a reflection model, and we find that in the hard state the smearing parameters are remarkably similar to those found in a previous XMM-Newton observation performed in the soft state. In particular, we find that the inner disk radius is Rin = 17 +/- 5 Rg (where Rg is the Gravitational radius, GM/c^2), the emissivity dependence from the disk radius is -2.5 +/- 0.5, the inclination angle with respect to the line of sight is i = 43 +/- 5 degrees, and the outer radius of the emitting region in the disk is Rout > 200 Rg. We note that the accretion disk does not appear to be truncated at large radii, although the source is in a hard state at about 3 % of the Eddington luminosity for a neutron star. We also find evidence of a broad emission line at low energies, at 3.03 +/- 0.03 keV, compatible with emission from mildly ionized Argon (Ar XVI-XVII). Argon transitions are not included in the self-consistent reflection models that we used and we therefore added an extra component to our model to fit this feature. The low energy line appears compatible with being smeared by the same inner disk parameters found for the reflection component.
  • We present a study of the accretion flow to the intermittent accreting millisecond pulsar, HETE J1900.1-2455, based on observations performed simultaneously by XMM-Newton and RXTE. The 0.33-50 keV spectrum is described by the sum of a hard Comptonized component originated in an optically thin {\tau}~1 corona, a soft kTin~0.2 keV component interpreted as accretion disc emission, and of disc reflection of the hard component. Two emission features are detected at energies of 0.98(1) and 6.58(7) keV, respectively. The latter is identified as K{\alpha} transition of Fe XXIII-XXV. A simultaneous detection in EPIC-pn, EPIC-MOS2, and RGS spectra favours an astrophysical origin also for the former, which has an energy compatible with Fe-L{\alpha} and helium-like Ne-K{\alpha} transitions. Broadness of the two features suggests a common origin, resulting from reflection in an accretion disc with inclination of (30+4{\deg}), and extending down to Rin=25(+16,-11) gravitational radii from the compact object. However, the strength of the feature at lower energy measured by EPIC-pn cannot be entirely reconciled with the amplitude of the Fe K{\alpha} line, hampering the possibility of describing it in terms of a broad-band reflection model, and preventing a firm identification. Pulsations at the 377.3 Hz spin frequency could not be detected, with an upper limit of 0.4% at 3-{\sigma} c.l. on the fractional amplitude. We interpret the inner disc radius estimated from spectral modelling and the lack of significant detection of coherent X-ray pulsations as an indication of a disc accretion flow truncated by some mechanism connected to the overall evolution of the accretion disc, rather than by the neutron star magnetic field. This is compatible with the extremely close similarity of spectral and temporal properties of this source with respect to other, non pulsing atoll sources in the hard state.
  • We use data of the bright atoll source 4U 1705-44 taken with XMM-Newton, BeppoSAX and RXTE both in the hard and in the soft state to perform a self-consistent study of the reflection component in this source. Although the data from these X-ray observatories are not simultaneous, the spectral decomposition is shown to be consistent among the different observations, when the source flux is similar. We therefore select observations performed at similar flux levels in the hard and soft state in order to study the spectral shape in these two states in a broad band (0.1-200 keV) energy range, with good energy resolution, and using self-consistent reflection models. These reflection models provide a good fit for the X-ray spectrum both in the hard and in the soft state in the whole spectral range. We discuss the differences in the main spectral parameters we find in the hard and the soft state, respectively, providing evidence that the inner radius of the optically thick disk slightly recedes in the hard state.
  • On 2010 October 13, the X-ray astronomical satellite Rossi XTE, during the observation of the newly discovered accretion powered X-ray pulsar IGR J17480--2446, detected a lunar occultation of the source. From knowledge of lunar topography and Earth, Moon, and spacecraft ephemeris at the epoch of the event, we determined the source position with an accuracy of 40 mas (1{\sigma} c.l.), which is interesting, given the very poor imaging capabilities of RXTE (\sim 1\circ). For the first time, using a non-imaging X-ray observatory, the position of an X-ray source with a subarcsecond accuracy is derived, demonstrating the neat capabilities of a technique that can be fruitfully applied to current and future X-ray missions.
  • We present the results of a spectroscopic study of the Fe K{\alpha} emission of the persistent neutron-star atoll low-mass X-ray binary and type I X-ray burster GX 3+1 with the EPIC-PN on board XMM-Newton. The source shows a flux modulation over several years and we observed it during its fainter phase, which corresponds to an X-ray luminosity of Lx~10^37 ergs/s. When fitted with a two-component model, the X-ray spectrum shows broad residuals at \sim6-7 keV that can be ascribed to an iron K{\alpha} fluorescence line. In addition, lower energy features are observed at \sim3.3 keV, \sim3.9 keV and might originate from Ar XVIII and Ca XIX. The broad iron line feature is well fitted with a relativistically smeared profile. This result is robust against possible systematics caused by instrumental pile-up effects. Assuming that the line is produced by reflection from the inner accretion disk, we infer an inner disk radius of \sim25 Rg and a disk inclination of 35{\deg} < i < 44{\deg}.
  • Circinus X-1 is a neutron-star-accreting X-ray binary in a wide (P$_{\rm orb}$ = 16.6 d), eccentric orbit. After two years of relatively low X-ray luminosity, in May 2010 Circinus X-1 went into outburst, reaching 0.4 Crab flux. This outburst lasted for about two orbital cycles and was followed by another shorter and fainter outburst in June. We focus here on the broadband X-ray spectral evolution of the source as it spans about three order of magnitudes in flux. We attempt to relate luminosity, spectral shape, local absorption, and orbital phase. We use multiple Rossi-XTE/PCA (3.0--25 keV) and Swift/XRT (1.0--9.0 keV) observations and a 20 ks long Chandra/HETGS observation (1.0--9.0 keV), to comprehensively track the spectral evolution of the source during all the outbursting phases. These observations were taken every two/three days and cover about four orbital cycles. The PCA data mostly cover the major outburst, the XRT data monitor the declining phase of the major outburst and all the phases of the minor outburst, and Chandra data provide an essential snapshot of the end of this overall outbursting phase. The X-ray spectrum can be satisfactorily described by a thermal Comptonization model with variable neutral local absorption in all phases of the outburst. No other additive component is statistically required. The first outburst decays linearly, with an ankle in the light curve as the flux decreases below $\sim$\,5 $\times$ 10$^{-10}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. At the same time, the source shows a clear spectral state transition from an optically thick to an optically thin state. While the characteristics of the first, bright, outburst can be interpreted within the disk-instability scenario, the following, minor, outburst shows peculiarities that cannot be easily reconciled in this framework.