• The "kinematic" morphology-density relation for early-type galaxies posits that those galaxies with low angular momentum are preferentially found in the highest-density regions of the universe. We use a large sample of galaxy groups with halo masses 10^12.5 < M_halo < 10^14.5 M_sun/h observed with the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) survey to examine whether there is a correlation between local environment and rotational support that is independent of stellar mass. We find no compelling evidence for a relationship between the angular momentum content of early-type galaxies and either local overdensity or radial position within the group at fixed stellar mass.
  • Galaxy mergers are believed to trigger strong starbursts. This is well assessed by observations in the local Universe. However the efficiency of this mechanism has poorly been tested so far for high redshift, actively star forming, galaxies. We present a suite of pc-resolution hydrodynamical numerical simulations to compare the star formation process along a merging sequence of high and low z galaxies, by varying the gas mass fraction between the two models. We show that, for the same orbit, high-redshift gas-rich mergers are less efficient than low-redshift ones at producing starbursts: the star formation rate excess induced by the merger and its duration are both around 10 times lower than in the low gas fraction case. The mechanisms that account for the star formation triggering at low redshift - the increased compressive turbulence, gas fragmentation, and central gas inflows - are only mildly, if not at all, enhanced for high gas fraction galaxy encounters. Furthermore, we show that the strong stellar feedback from the initially high star formation rate in high redshift galaxies does not prevent an increase of the star formation during the merger. Our results are consistent with the observed increase of the number of major mergers with increasing redshift being faster than the respective increase in the number of starburst galaxies.
  • We study the properties of 66 galaxies with kinematically misaligned gas and stars from MaNGA survey. The fraction of kinematically misaligned galaxies varies with galaxy physical parameters, i.e. M*, SFR and sSFR. According to their sSFR, we further classify these 66 galaxies into three categories, 10 star-forming, 26 "Green Valley" and 30 quiescent ones. The properties of different types of kinematically misaligned galaxies are different in that the star-forming ones have positive gradient in D4000 and higher gas-phase metallicity, while the green valley/quiescent ones have negative D4000 gradients and lower gas-phase metallicity on average. There is evidence that all types of the kinematically misaligned galaxies tend to live in more isolated environment. Based on all these observational results, we propose a scenario for the formation of star forming galaxies with kinematically misaligned gas and stars - the progenitor accretes misaligned gas from a gas-rich dwarf or cosmic web, the cancellation of angular momentum from gas-gas collisions between the pre-existing gas and the accreted gas largely accelerates gas inflow, leading to fast centrally-concentrated star-formation. The higher metallicity is due to enrichment from this star formation. For the kinematically misaligned green valley and quiescent galaxies, they might be formed through gas-poor progenitors accreting kinematically misaligned gas from satellites which are smaller in mass.
  • (Abridged) We make use of the deepest VLT/MUSE observations performed so far on the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS) to characterize the low-mass (< $10^{10}$M$_\odot$) galaxy population at intermediate redshift. We identify a sample of 28 spatially-resolved emission-line galaxies in the deep (27h integration time) MUSE data cube, spread over a redshift interval of 0.2 < z < 1.4. The public HST images and multi-band photometry over the HDFS are used to constrain the stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies and to perform a morphological analysis. We derive the resolved ionized gas properties of these galaxies from the MUSE data and model the disk (both in 2D and with GalPaK$^{\rm 3D}$) to retrieve their intrinsic gas kinematics. We build a sample of resolved emission-line galaxies of much lower stellar mass and SFR (by $\sim$1-2 orders of magnitude) than previous 3D spectroscopic surveys. Most of the spatially-resolved MUSE-HDFS galaxies have gas kinematics consistent with disk-like rotation, but about 20% have velocity dispersions larger than the rotation velocities, and 30% are part of a close pair and/or show clear signs of recent gravitational interactions. In the high-mass regime, the MUSE-HDFS galaxies follow the Tully-Fisher relation defined from previous surveys in a similar redshift range. This scaling relation extends also to lower masses/velocities but with a higher dispersion. The MUSE-HDFS galaxies follow the scaling relations defined in the local universe between the specific angular momentum and the stellar mass. However, we find that intermediate-redshift star-forming galaxies fill a continuum transition from the spiral to elliptical local scaling relations, according to the dynamical state of the gas. This indicates that some galaxies may lose their angular momentum and become dispersion-dominated prior to becoming passive.
  • We observed the lenticular galaxy NGC 3998 with the Mitchell Integral-Field Spectrograph and extracted line-of-sight velocity distributions out to 3 half-light radii. We constructed collisionless orbit models in order to constrain NGC 3998's dark and visible structure, using kinematics from both the Mitchell and SAURON instruments. We find NGC 3998 to be almost axisymmetric, seen nearly face on with a flattened intrinsic shape - i.e., a face-on fast-rotator. We find an I-band mass-to-light ratio of $4.7_{-0.45}^{+0.32}$ in good agreement with previous spectral fitting results for this galaxy. Our best-fit orbit model shows a both a bulge and a disc component, with a non-negligible counter-rotating component also evident. We find that relatively little dark matter is needed to model this galaxy, with an inferred dark mass fraction of just $(7.1^{+8.1}_{-7.1})\%$ within one half-light radius.
  • (Abridged) We investigate the intrinsic shapes of low-luminosity galaxies in the central 300 kpc of the Virgo cluster using deep imaging obtained as part of the NGVS. We build a sample of nearly 300 red-sequence cluster members in the yet unexplored $-14 < M_{g} < -8$ magnitude range. The observed distribution of apparent axis ratios is then fit by families of triaxial models with normally-distributed intrinsic ellipticities and triaxialities. We develop a Bayesian framework to explore the posterior distribution of the model parameters, which allows us to work directly on discrete data, and to account for individual, surface brightness-dependent axis ratio uncertainties. For this population we infer a mean intrinsic ellipticity E=0.43, and a mean triaxiality T=0.16. This implies that faint Virgo galaxies are best described as a family of thick, nearly oblate spheroids with mean intrinsic axis ratios 1:0.94:0.57. We additionally attempt a study of the intrinsic shapes of Local Group satellites of similar luminosities. For the LG population we infer a slightly larger mean intrinsic ellipticity E=0.51, and the paucity of objects with round apparent shapes translates into more triaxial mean shapes, 1:0.76:0.49. We finally compare the intrinsic shapes of NGVS low-mass galaxies with samples of more massive quiescent systems, and with field, star-forming galaxies of similar luminosities. We find that the intrinsic flattening in this low-luminosity regime is almost independent of the environment in which the galaxy resides--but there is a hint that objects may be slightly rounder in denser environments. The comparable flattening distributions of low-luminosity galaxies that have experienced very different degrees of environmental effects suggests that internal processes are the main drivers of galaxy structure at low masses--with external mechanisms playing a secondary role.
  • We report the detection of extended Ly alpha emission around individual star-forming galaxies at redshifts z = 3-6 in an ultradeep exposure of the Hubble Deep Field South obtained with MUSE on the ESO-VLT. The data reach a limiting surface brightness (1sigma) of ~1 x 10^-19 erg s^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 in azimuthally averaged radial profiles, an order of magnitude improvement over previous narrowband imaging. Our sample consists of 26 spectroscopically confirmed Ly alpha-emitting, but mostly continuum-faint (m_AB >~ 27) galaxies. In most objects the Ly alpha emission is considerably more extended than the UV continuum light. While 5 of the faintest galaxies in the sample show no significantly detected Ly alpha haloes, the derived upper limits suggest that this is just due to insufficient S/N. Ly alpha haloes therefore appear to be (nearly) ubiquitous even for low-mass (~10^8-10^9 M_sun) star-forming galaxies at z>3. We decompose the Ly alpha emission of each object into a compact `continuum-like' and an extended halo component, and infer sizes and luminosities of the haloes. The extended Ly alpha emission approximately follows an exponential surface brightness distribution with a scale length of a few kpc. While these haloes are thus quite modest in terms of their absolute sizes, they are larger by a factor of 5-15 than the corresponding rest-frame UV continuum sources as seen by HST. They are also much more extended, by a factor ~5, than Ly alpha haloes around low-redshift star-forming galaxies. Between ~40% and >90% of the observed Ly alpha flux comes from the extended halo component, with no obvious correlation of this fraction with either the absolute or the relative size of the Ly alpha halo. Our observations provide direct insights into the spatial distribution of at least partly neutral gas residing in the circumgalactic medium of low to intermediate mass galaxies at z > 3.
  • The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find that such events increase the Mach number of the cloud, leading to an enhanced star formation efficiency and finally the formation of massive stellar associations, in a fashion similar to galaxy-galaxy interactions. We highlight the role of bar dynamics in decoupling young stars from the clouds in which they form, and discuss the implications on the injection of feedback into the interstellar medium, in particular in the context of galaxy formation.
  • MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a SDSS-IV survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 \AA\ to 10300 \AA\ for a representative sample of over 10000 nearby galaxies. In this paper we present the analysis of nebular emission line properties in 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. Using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, which illustrates that galaxy characterisations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended LINER-like emission (up to $\rm 1 R_{e}$) in three galaxies. We make use of the $\rm EW(H \alpha)$ to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionisation from hot evolved stars. We derive stellar population indices and demonstrate a clear correlation between $\rm D_n(4000)$ and $\rm EW(H \delta_A)$ and the position in the ionisation diagnostic diagram: resolved galactic regions which are ionised by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent star formation and host older and/or more metal rich stellar populations. We also detect extraplanar LINER-like emission in two highly inclined galaxies, and identify it with diffuse ionised gas. We investigate spatially resolved metallicities and find a positive correlation between metallicity and star formation rate (SFR) surface density. We study the relation between N/O vs O/H on resolved scales. We find that, at given N/O, regions within individual galaxies are spread towards lower metallicities, deviating from the sequence defined by galactic central regions as traced by Sloan $3''$ fibre spectra. We suggest that the observed dispersion can be a tracer for gas flows in galaxies: infalls of pristine gas and/or the effect of a galactic fountain.
  • We present spatially resolved kinematics and global stellar populations and mass-to-light ratios for a sample of 39 dwarf early-type (dE) galaxies in the Virgo cluster studied as part of the SMAKCED stellar absorption-line spectroscopy and imaging survey. This sample is representative of the early-type population in the absolute magnitude range -19.0 < M_r < -16.0. For each dE, we measure the rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile and fit an analytic function to the rotation curve. We study the significance of the departure of the rotation curve from the best fit analytic function (poorly fit) and of the difference between the approaching and receding sides of the rotation curve (asymmetry). We find that 62 +/- 8 % (23 out of the 39) of the dEs have a significant anomaly in their rotation curve. Analysis of the images reveals photometric anomalies for most galaxies. However, there is no clear correlation between the significance of the photometric and kinematic anomalies. We measure age-sensitive and metallicity-sensitive Lick spectral indices and find a wide range of ages and metallicities. We also find that 4 dEs have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. Finally, we estimate the total masses and dark matter fractions of the dEs. They have a median total mass and dark matter fraction within the Re of log Me = 9.1 +/- 0.2 and f_DM = 46 +/- 18 %. We plot several scaling relations and show that dEs seem to be the bridge between massive early-type and dwarf spheroidal galaxies.
  • We analyze the stellar kinematics of 39 dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) in the Virgo cluster. Based on the specific stellar angular momentum lambda_e and the ellipticity, we find 11 slow rotators and 28 fast rotators. The fast rotators in the outer parts of the Virgo cluster rotate significantly faster than fast rotators in the inner parts of the cluster. Moreover, 10 out of the 11 slow rotators are located in the inner 3 degrees (D < 1 Mpc) of the cluster. The fast rotators contain subtle disky structures that are visible in high-pass filtered optical images, while the slow rotators do not exhibit these structures. In addition, two of the dEs have kinematically decoupled cores and four more have emission partially filling in the Balmer absorption lines. These properties suggest that Virgo cluster dEs may have originated from late-type star-forming galaxies that were transformed by the environment after their infall into the cluster. The correlation between lambda_e and the clustercentric distance can be explained by a scenario where low luminosity star-forming galaxies fall into the cluster, their gas is rapidly removed by ram pressure stripping, although some of it can be retained in their core, their star-formation is quenched but their stellar kinematics are preserved. After a long time in the cluster and several passes through its center, the galaxies are heated up and transformed into slow rotating dEs.
  • We analyse the 2-dimensional distribution and kinematics of the stars as well as molecular and ionised gas in the central few hundred parsecs of 5 active and 5 matched inactive galaxies. The equivalent widths of the Br-gamma line indicate there is no on-going star formation in their nuclei, although recent (terminated) starbursts are possible in the active galaxies. The stellar velocity fields show no signs of non-circular motions, while the 1-0S(1) H_2 kinematics exhibit significant deviations from simple circular rotation. In the active galaxies the H_2 kinematics reveal inflow and outflow superimposed on disk rotation. Steady-state circumnuclear inflow is seen in three AGN, and hydrodynamical models indicate it can be driven by a large scale bar. In three of the five AGN, molecular outflows are spatially resolved. The outflows are oriented such that they intersect, or have an edge close to, the disk - which may be the source of molecular gas in the outflow. The relatively low speeds imply the gas will fall back onto the disk; and with moderate outflow rates, they will have only a local impact on the host galaxy. H_2 was detected in two inactive galaxies. These exhibit chaotic circumnuclear dust morphologies and have molecular structures that are counter-rotating with respect to the main gas component, which could lead to gas inflow in the near future. In our sample, all four galaxies with chaotic dust morphology in the circumnuclear region exist in moderately dense groups with 10-15 members where accretion of stripped gas can easily occur.
  • The central galaxies of some clusters can be strong emitters in the Ly$\alpha$ and H$\alpha$ lines. This emission may arise either from the cool/warm gas located in the cool core of the cluster or from the bright AGN within the central galaxy. The luminosities of such lines can be as high as $10^{42} - 10^{44}$ erg/s. This emission originating from the core of the cluster will get Thomson scattered by hot electrons of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) with an optical depth $\sim$ 0.01 giving rise to very broad ($\Delta \lambda / \lambda \sim$ 15%) features in the scattered spectrum. We discuss the possibility of measuring the electron density and temperature using information on the flux and width of the highly broadened line features.
  • We present a study of the cold gas contents of the Atlas3D early-type galaxies, in the context of their optical colours, near-UV colours, and H\beta\ absorption line strengths. Early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies are not as gas-poor as previously thought, and at least 40% of local early-type galaxies are now known to contain molecular and/or atomic gas. This cold gas offers the opportunity to study recent galaxy evolution through the processes of cold gas acquisition, consumption (star formation), and removal. Molecular and atomic gas detection rates range from 10% to 34% in red sequence early-type galaxies, depending on how the red sequence is defined, and from 50% to 70% in blue early-type galaxies. Notably, massive red sequence early-type galaxies (stellar masses > 5e10 Msun, derived from dynamical models) are found to have HI masses up to M(HI)/Mstar ~ 0.06 and H_2 masses up to M(H$_2$)/Mstar ~ 0.01. Some 20% of all massive early-type galaxies may have retained atomic and/or molecular gas through their transition to the red sequence. However, kinematic and metallicity signatures of external gas accretion (either from satellite galaxies or the intergalactic medium) are also common, particularly at stellar masses <= 5e10 Msun, where such signatures are found in ~ 50% of H$_2$-rich early-type galaxies. Our data are thus consistent with a scenario in which fast rotator early-type galaxies are quenched former spiral galaxies which have undergone some bulge growth processes, and in addition, some of them also experience cold gas accretion which can initiate a period of modest star formation activity. We discuss implications for the interpretation of colour-magnitude diagrams.
  • We present a detailed two-dimensional stellar dynamical analysis of a sample of 44 cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of individual central galaxies and their satellites. Kinematic maps of the stellar line-of-sight velocity, velocity dispersion, and higher-order Gauss-Hermite moments $h_3$ and $h_4$ are constructed for each central galaxy and for the most massive satellites. The amount of rotation is quantified using the $\lambda_{\mathrm{R}}$-parameter. The velocity, velocity dispersion, $h_3$, and $h_4$ fields of the simulated galaxies show a diversity similar to observed kinematic maps of early-type galaxies in the ATLAS$^{\rm{3D}}$ survey. This includes fast (regular), slow, and misaligned rotation, hot spheroids with embedded cold disk components as well as galaxies with counter-rotating cores or central depressions in the velocity dispersion. We link the present day kinematic properties to the individual cosmological formation histories of the galaxies. In general, major galaxy mergers have a significant influence on the rotation properties resulting in both a spin-down as well as a spin-up of the merger remnant. Lower mass galaxies with significant in-situ formation of stars, or with additional gas-rich major mergers - resulting in a spin-up - in their formation history, form elongated fast rotators with a clear anti-correlation of $h_3$ and $v/\sigma$. An additional formation path for fast rotators includes gas poor major mergers leading to a spin-up of the remnants. This formation path does not result in anti-correlated $h_3$ and $v/\sigma$. The galaxies most consistent with the rare class of non-rotating round early-type galaxies grow by gas-poor minor mergers alone. In general, more massive galaxies have less in-situ star formation since $z \sim 2$, rotate slower and have older stellar populations. (shortened)
  • Building on the experience of the high-resolution community with the suite of VLT high-resolution spectrographs, which has been tremendously successful, we outline here the (science) case for a high-fidelity, high-resolution spectrograph with wide wavelength coverage at the E-ELT. Flagship science drivers include: the study of exo-planetary atmospheres with the prospect of the detection of signatures of life on rocky planets; the chemical composition of planetary debris on the surface of white dwarfs; the spectroscopic study of protoplanetary and proto-stellar disks; the extension of Galactic archaeology to the Local Group and beyond; spectroscopic studies of the evolution of galaxies with samples that, unlike now, are no longer restricted to strongly star forming and/or very massive galaxies; the unraveling of the complex roles of stellar and AGN feedback; the study of the chemical signatures imprinted by population III stars on the IGM during the epoch of reionization; the exciting possibility of paradigm-changing contributions to fundamental physics. The requirements of these science cases can be met by a stable instrument with a spectral resolution of R~100,000 and broad, simultaneous spectral coverage extending from 370nm to 2500nm. Most science cases do not require spatially resolved information, and can be pursued in seeing-limited mode, although some of them would benefit by the E-ELT diffraction limited resolution. Some multiplexing would also be beneficial for some of the science cases. (Abridged)
  • The organization of the interstellar medium in disk galaxies obeys the large scale dynamics set by kpc-size structures. Improving our knowledge of how the dense, molecular gas is distributed in a disk is an important step in our understanding of star formation at galactic scale. Using a recently published simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we explore the formation and dynamical organization of the star forming gas in a proto-typical disk. Along spiral arms, we report the formation of regularly spaced clouds, called beads on a string and spurs. The former form through gravitational instabilities while the later originate from Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We propose that the co-existence of both structures in the same galaxy can be explained by a different role of the disk dynamics, depending on the location within the disk. In particular, we highlight the impact of the pitch angle of the spiral arm in the development of either type of structure.
  • We present a self-consistent hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, at the resolution of 0.05 pc. The model includes star formation and a new implementation of stellar feedback through photo-ionization, radiative pressure and supernovae. The simulation resolves the structure of the interstellar medium at subparsec resolution for a few cloud lifetimes, and at 0.05 pc for about a cloud crossing time. Turbulence cascade and gravitation from the kpc scales are de facto included in smaller structures like molecular clouds. We show that the formation of a bar influences the dynamics of the central ~100 pc by creating resonances. At larger radii, the spiral arms host the formation of regularly spaced clouds: beads on a string and spurs. These instabilities pump turbulent energy into the gas, generally in the supersonic regime. Because of asymmetric drift, the supernovae explode outside of their gaseous nursery, which diminishes the effect of feedback on the structure of clouds. The evolution of clouds is thus mostly due to fragmentation and gas consumption, regulated mainly by supersonic turbulence. The transition from turbulence supported to self-gravitating gas is detected in the gas density probability distribution function at ~2000 cm^-3. The power spectrum density suggests that gravitation governs the hierarchical organisation of structures from the galactic scale down to a few parsecs.
  • The distribution of gas in the central kiloparsec of a galaxy has a dynamically rapid evolution. Nonaxisymmetries in the gravitational potential of the galactic disk, such as a large scale stellar bar or spiral, can lead to significant radial motion of gaseous material from larger radii to the central region. The large influx of gas and the subsequent star formation keep the central region constantly changing. However, the ability of gas to reach the nucleus proper to fuel an AGN phase is not guaranteed. Gas inflow can be halted at a circumnuclear star forming ring several hundred parsec away. The nearby galaxy NGC5248 is especially interesting in this sense since it is said to host 2 circumnuclear star forming rings at 100pc and 370pc from its quiescent nucleus. Here we present new subarcsecond PdBI+30m CO(2-1) emission line observations of the central region. For the first time the molecular gas distribution at the smallest stellar ring is resolved into a gas ring, consistent with the presence of a quiescent nucleus. However, the molecular gas shows no ring structure at the larger ring. We combine analyses of the gaseous and stellar content in the central kiloparsec of this galaxy to understand the gas distribution and dynamics of this star forming central region. We discuss the probability of two scenarios leading to the current observations, given our full understanding of this system, and discuss whether there are really two circumnuclear star forming rings in this galaxy.
  • Gas inflowing along stellar bars is often stalled at the location of circumnuclear rings, that form an effective reservoir for massive star formation and thus shape the central regions of galaxies. However, how exactly star formation is proceeding within these circumnuclear starburst rings is subject of debate. Two main scenarios for this process have been put forward: In the first the onset of star formation is regulated by the total amount of gas present in the ring with star forming starting once a mass threshold has reached in a `random' position within the ring like `popcorn'. In the second star formation preferentially takes place near the locations where the gas enters the ring. This scenario has been dubbed `pearls-on-a-string'. Here we combine new optical IFU data covering the full stellar bar with existing multi-wavelength data to study in detail the 580 pc radius circumnuclear starburst ring in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6951. Using HST archival data together with Sauron and Oasis IFU data, we derive the ages and stellar masses of star clusters as well as the total stellar content of the central region. Adding information on the molecular gas distribution, stellar and gaseous dynamics and extinction, we find that the circumnuclear ring in NGC 6951 is ~1-1.5 Gyr old and has been forming stars for most of that time. We see evidence for preferred sites of star formation within the ring, consistent with the `pearls-on-a-string' scenario, when focusing on the youngest stellar populations. Due to the ring's longevity this signature is washed out when older stellar populations are included in the analysis.
  • NGC 1266 is a nearby field galaxy observed as part of the ATLAS3D survey (Cappellari et al. 2011). NGC 1266 has been shown to host a compact (< 200 pc) molecular disk and a mass-loaded molecular outflow driven by the AGN (Alatalo et al. 2011). Very Long Basline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.65 GHz revealed a compact (diameter < 1.2 pc), high bright- ness temperature continuum source most consistent with a low-level AGN origin. The VLBA continuum source is positioned at the center of the molecular disk and may be responsible for the expulsion of molecular gas in NGC 1266. Thus, the candidate AGN-driven molecular outflow in NGC 1266 supports the picture in which AGNs do play a significant role in the quenching of star formation and ultimately the evolution of the red sequence of galaxies.
  • We detail the rich molecular story of NGC 1266, its serendipitous discovery within the ATLAS3D survey (Cappellari et al. 2011) and how it plays host to an AGN-driven molecular outflow, potentially quenching all of its star formation (SF) within the next 100 Myr. While major mergers appear to play a role in instigating outflows in other systems, deep imaging of NGC 1266 as well as stellar kinematic observations from SAURON, have failed to provide evidence that NGC 1266 has recently been involved in a major interaction. The molecular gas and the instantaneous SF tracers indicate that the current sites of star formation are located in a hypercompact disk within 200 pc of the nucleus (Fig. 1; SF rate ~ 2 Msuns/yr). On the other hand, tracers of recent star formation, such as the H{\beta} absorption map from SAURON and stellar population analysis show that the young stars are distributed throughout a larger area of the galaxy than current star formation. As the AGN at the center of NGC 1266 continues to drive cold gas out of the galaxy, we expect star formation rates to decline as the star formation is ultimately quenched. Thus, NGC 1266 is in the midst of a key portion of its evolution and continued studies of this unique galaxy may help improve our understanding of how galaxies transition from the blue to the red sequence (Alatalo et al. 2011).
  • [Abridged] We present ground-based MDM V-band and Spitzer/IRAC 3.6um-band photometric observations of the 72 representative galaxies of the SAURON Survey. In combination with the SAURON stellar velocity dispersion measured within an effective radius (se), this allows us to explore the location of our galaxies in the main scaling relations. We investigate the dependence of these relations on our recent kinematical classification of early-type galaxies (i.e. Slow/Fast Rotators) and the stellar populations. Slow Rotator and Fast Rotator E/S0 galaxies do not populate distinct locations in the scaling relations, although Slow Rotators display a smaller intrinsic scatter. Surprisingly, extremely young objects do not display the bluest (V-[3.6]) colours in our sample, as is usually the case in optical colours. This can be understood in the context of the large contribution of TP-AGB stars to the infrared, even for young populations, resulting in a very tight (V-[3.6]) - se relation that in turn allows us to define a strong correlation between metallicity and velocity dispersion. Many Sa galaxies appear to follow the Fundamental Plane defined by E/S0 galaxies. Galaxies that appear offset from the relations correspond mostly to objects with extremely young populations, with signs of on-going, extended star formation. We correct for this effect in the Fundamental Plane, by replacing luminosity with stellar mass using an estimate of the stellar mass-to-light ratio, so that all galaxies are part of a tight, single relation. The new estimated coefficients are consistent in both photometric bands and suggest that differences in stellar populations account for about half of the observed tilt with respect to the virial prediction. After these corrections, the Slow Rotator family shows almost no intrinsic scatter around the best-fit Fundamental Plane.
  • The molecular gas content of local early-type galaxies is constrained and discussed in relation to their evolution. First, as part of the Atlas3D survey, we present the first complete, large (260 objects), volume-limited single-dish survey of CO in normal local early-type galaxies. We find a surprisingly high detection rate of 22%, independent of luminosity and at best weakly dependent on environment. Second, the extent of the molecular gas is constrained with CO synthesis imaging, and a variety of morphologies is revealed. The kinematics of the molecular gas and stars are often misaligned, implying an external gas origin in over a third of the systems, although this behaviour is drastically diffferent between field and cluster environments. Third, many objects appear to be in the process of forming regular kpc-size decoupled disks, and a star formation sequence can be sketched by piecing together multi-wavelength information on the molecular gas, current star formation, and young stars. Last, early-type galaxies do not seem to systematically obey all our usual prejudices regarding star formation, following the standard Schmidt-Kennicutt law but not the far infrared-radio correlation. This may suggest a greater diversity in star formation processes than observed in disk galaxies. Using multiple molecular tracers, we are thus starting to probe the physical conditions of the cold gas in early-types.
  • The GALEX Ultraviolet Virgo Cluster Survey (GUViCS) is a complete blind survey of the Virgo cluster covering about 40 sq. deg. in the far UV (FUV, lambda_eff=1539A, Delta-lambda=442A) and about 120 sq. deg. in the near UV (NUV, lambda_eff=2316A, Delta-lambda=1060A). The goal of the survey is to study the ultraviolet (UV) properties of galaxies in a rich cluster environment, spanning a wide luminosity range from giants to dwarfs, and regardless of prior knowledge of their star formation activity. The UV data will be combined with those in other bands (optical: NGVS; far-infrared - submm: HeViCS; HI: ALFALFA) and with our multizone chemo-spectrophotometric models of galaxy evolution to make a complete and exhaustive study of the effects of the environment on the evolution of galaxies in high density regions. We present here the scientific objectives of the survey, describing the observing strategy and briefly discussing different data reduction techniques. Using UV data already in-hand for the central 12 sq. deg. we determine the FUV and NUV luminosity functions of the Virgo cluster core for all cluster members and separately for early- and late-type galaxies and compare it to the one obtained in the field and other nearby clusters (Coma, A1367). This analysis shows that the FUV and NUV luminosity functions of the core of the Virgo clusters are flatter (alpha about -1.1) than those determined in Coma and A1367. We discuss the possible origin of this difference