• Hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) have been predominantly found in low-metallicity, star-forming dwarf galaxies. Here we identify Gaia17biu/SN 2017egm as an SLSN-I occurring in a "normal" spiral galaxy (NGC 3191) in terms of stellar mass (several times 10^10 M_sun) and metallicity (roughly Solar). At redshift z=0.031, Gaia17biu is also the lowest redshift SLSN-I to date, and the absence of a larger population of SLSNe-I in dwarf galaxies of similar redshift suggests that metallicity is likely less important to the production of SLSNe-I than previously believed. With the smallest distance and highest apparent brightness for an SLSN-I, we are able to study Gaia17biu in unprecedented detail. Its pre-peak near-ultraviolet to optical color is similar to that of Gaia16apd and among the bluest observed for an SLSN-I while its peak luminosity (M_g = -21 mag) is substantially lower than Gaia16apd. Thanks to the high signal-to-noise ratios of our spectra, we identify several new spectroscopic features that may help to probe the properties of these enigmatic explosions. We detect polarization at the ~0.5% level that is not strongly dependent on wavelength, suggesting a modest, global departure from spherical symmetry. In addition, we put the tightest upper limit yet on the radio luminosity of an SLSN-I with <5.4x10^26 erg/s/Hz (at 10 GHz), which is almost a factor of 40 better than previous upper limits and one of the few measured at an early stage in the evolution of an SLSN-I. This limit largely rules out an association of this SLSNe-I with known populations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) like central engines.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the highly luminous Type Ibn supernova ASASSN-14ms, which was discovered on UT 2014-12-26.61 at $m_V \sim 16.5$. With a peak absolute $V$-band magnitude brighter than $-20.5$, a peak bolometric luminosity of $1.7 \times 10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, and a total radiated energy of $2.1 \times 10^{50}$ ergs, ASASSN-14ms is one of the most luminous Type Ibn supernovae yet discovered. In simple models, the most likely power source for this event is a combination of the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni and $^{56}$Co at late times and the interaction of supernova ejecta with the progenitor's circumstellar medium at early times, although we cannot rule out the possibility of a magnetar-powered light curve. The presence of a dense circumstellar medium is indicated by the intermediate-width He I features in the spectra. The faint ($m_g \sim 21.6$) host galaxy SDSS J130408.52+521846.4 has an oxygen abundance below $12+\log(O/H) \lesssim 8.3$, a stellar mass of $M_* \sim 2.6 \times 10^8 M_{\odot}$, and a star formation rate of $\textrm{SFR} \sim 0.02$ $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$.
  • This catalog summarizes information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) and all other bright ($m_{peak}\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered in 2016. We then gather the near-IR through UV magnitudes of all host galaxies and the offsets of the supernovae from the centers of their hosts from public databases. We illustrate the results using a sample that now totals 668 supernovae discovered since 2014 May 1, including the supernovae from our previous catalogs, with type distributions closely matching those of the ideal magnitude limited sample from Li et al. (2011). This is the third of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.
  • We present the ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic evolution of a tidal disruption event (TDE) for the first time. After the discovery of the nearby TDE iPTF16fnl, we obtained a series of observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The dominant emission features closely resemble those seen in the UV spectra of the TDE ASASSN-14li and are also similar to those of N-rich quasars. However, there is significant evolution in the shape and central wavelength of the line profiles over the course of our observations, such that at early times the lines are broad and redshifted, while at later times the lines are significantly narrower and peak near the wavelengths of their corresponding atomic transitions. Like ASASSN-14li, but unlike N-rich quasars, iPTF16fnl shows neither MgII$\lambda 2798$\AA\ nor CIII]$\lambda 1909$\AA\ emission features. We also present optical photometry and spectroscopy, which suggest that the complex HeII profiles observed in the optical spectra of many TDEs are in part due to the presence of NIII and CIII Wolf-Rayet features, which can potentially serve as probes of the far-UV when space-based observations are not possible. Finally, we use Swift XRT and UVOT observations to place strong limits on the X-ray emission and determine the characteristic temperature, radius, and luminosity of the emitting material. We find that iPTF16fnl is subluminous and evolves more rapidly than other optically discovered TDEs.
  • We report the discovery of HAT-P-67b, a hot-Saturn transiting a rapidly rotating F-subgiant. HAT-P-67b has a radius of Rp = 2.085 -0.071/+0.096 RJ,, orbiting a M* = 1.642 -0.072/+0.155 Msun, R* = 2.546 -0.084/+0.099 Rsun host star in a ~4.81-day period orbit. We place an upper limit on the mass of the planet via radial velocity measurements to be Mp < 0.59 MJ, and lower limit of > 0.056 MJ by limitations on Roche lobe overflow. Despite being a subgiant, the host star still exhibits relatively rapid rotation, with a projected rotational velocity of v sin I* = 35.8 +/- 1.1 km/s, making it difficult to precisely determine the mass of the planet using radial velocities. We validated HAT-P-67b via two Doppler tomographic detections of the planetary transit, which eliminated potential eclipsing binary blend scenarios. The Doppler tomographic observations also confirmed that HAT-P-67b has an orbit that is aligned to within 12 degrees, in projection, with the spin of its host star. HAT-P-67b receives strong UV irradiation, and is amongst the one of the lowest density planets known, making it a good candidate for future UV transit observations to search for an extended hydrogen exosphere.
  • This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright ($m_V\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalog, we also present redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalog, this work comprises a complete catalog of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.
  • We present basic statistics for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during its first year-and-a-half of operations, spanning 2013 and 2014. We also present the same information for all other bright ($m_V\leq17$), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered from 2014 May 1 through the end of 2014, providing a comparison to the ASAS-SN sample starting from the point where ASAS-SN became operational in both hemispheres. In addition, we present collected redshifts and near-UV through IR magnitudes, where available, for all host galaxies of the bright supernovae in both samples. This work represents a comprehensive catalog of bright supernovae and their hosts from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were not previously possible because the all-sky emphasis of ASAS-SN redresses many previously existing biases. In particular, ASAS-SN systematically finds bright supernovae closer to the centers of host galaxies than either other professional surveys or amateurs, a remarkable result given ASAS-SN's poorer angular resolution. This is the first of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts that will be released by the ASAS-SN team.
  • We present ground-based and Swift photometric and spectroscopic observations of the tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-15oi, discovered at the center of 2MASX J20390918-3045201 ($d\simeq216$ Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). The source peaked at a bolometric luminosity of $L\simeq1.3\times10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ and radiated a total energy of $E\simeq6.6\times10^{50}$ ergs over the first $\sim3.5$ months of observations. The early optical/UV emission of the source can be fit by a blackbody with temperature increasing from $T\sim2\times10^4$ K to $T\sim4\times10^4$ K while the luminosity declines from $L\simeq1.3\times10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ to $L\simeq2.3\times10^{43}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, requiring the photosphere to be shrinking rapidly. The optical/UV luminosity decline during this period is most consistent with an exponential decline, $L\propto e^{-(t-t_0)/\tau}$, with $\tau \simeq46.5$ days for $t_0\simeq57241.6$ (MJD), while a power-law decline of $L\propto (t-t_0)^{-\alpha}$ with $t_0\simeq57212.3$ and $\alpha=1.62$ provides a moderately worse fit. ASASSN-15oi also exhibits roughly constant soft X-ray emission that is significantly weaker than the optical/UV emission. Spectra of the source show broad helium emission lines and strong blue continuum emission in early epochs, although these features fade rapidly and are not present $\sim3$ months after discovery. The early spectroscopic features and color evolution of ASASSN-15oi are consistent with a TDE, but the rapid spectral evolution is unique among optically-selected TDEs.
  • On 2014 Dec. 9.61, the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just $\sim2$ days after first light using a global array of 14-cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova ($V = 11.94$ mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve ($\Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.80 \pm 0.05$), a $B$-band maximum at $2457015.82 \pm 0.03$, a rise time of $16.94^{+ 0.11 }_{- 0.10 }$ days, and moderate host--galaxy extinction ($E(B-V)_{\textrm{host}} = 0.33 \pm 0.06$). Using ASASSN-14lp we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $\mu = 30.8 \pm 0.2$ corresponding to a distance of $14.7 \pm 1.5$ Mpc. However, adding ASASSN-14lp to the calibrating sample of Type Ia supernovae still requires an independent distance to the host galaxy. Finally, using our early-time photometric and spectroscopic observations, we rule out red giant secondaries and, assuming a favorable viewing angle and explosion time, any non-degenerate companion larger than $0.34 R_{\textrm{sun}}$.
  • We present ground-based and Swift photometric and spectroscopic observations of the candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) ASASSN-14li, found at the center of PGC 043234 ($d\simeq90$ Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). The source had a peak bolometric luminosity of $L\simeq10^{44}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ and a total integrated energy of $E\simeq7\times10^{50}$ ergs radiated over the $\sim6$ months of observations presented. The UV/optical emission of the source is well-fit by a blackbody with roughly constant temperature of $T\sim35,000$ K, while the luminosity declines by roughly a factor of 16 over this time. The optical/UV luminosity decline is broadly consistent with an exponential decline, $L\propto e^{-t/t_0}$, with $t_0\simeq60$ days. ASASSN-14li also exhibits soft X-ray emission comparable in luminosity to the optical and UV emission but declining at a slower rate, and the X-ray emission now dominates. Spectra of the source show broad Balmer and helium lines in emission as well as strong blue continuum emission at all epochs. We use the discoveries of ASASSN-14li and ASASSN-14ae to estimate the TDE rate implied by ASAS-SN, finding an average rate of $r \simeq 4.1 \times 10^{-5}~{\rm yr}^{-1}$ per galaxy with a 90% confidence interval of $(2.2 - 17.0) \times 10^{-5}~{\rm yr}^{-1}$ per galaxy. ASAS-SN found roughly 1 TDE for every 70 Type Ia supernovae in 2014, a rate that is much higher than that of other surveys.
  • We present results on multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring observations of the double-image gravitationally lensed blazar JVAS B0218+357. Multi-epoch observations started less than one month after the gamma-ray flare detected in 2012 by the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi, and spanned a 2-month interval. The radio light curves did not reveal any significant flux density variability, suggesting that no clear correlation between the high energy and low-energy emission is present. This behaviour was confirmed also by the long-term Owens Valley Radio Observatory monitoring data at 15 GHz. The milliarcsecond-scale resolution provided by the VLBA observations allowed us to resolve the two images of the lensed blazar, which have a core-jet structure. No significant morphological variation is found by the analysis of the multi-epoch data, suggesting that the region responsible for the gamma-ray variability is located in the core of the AGN, which is opaque up to the highest observing frequency of 22 GHz.
  • We report the discovery of ASASSN-15lh (SN 2015L), which we interpret as the most luminous supernova yet found. At redshift z = 0.2326, ASASSN-15lh reached an absolute magnitude of M_{u,AB} = -23.5+/-0.1 and bolometric luminosity L_bol = (2.2+/-0.2)x 10^45 ergs s^-1, which is more than twice as luminous as any previously known supernova. It has several major features characteristic of the hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe-I), whose energy sources and progenitors are currently poorly understood. In contrast to most previously known SLSNe-I that reside in star-forming dwarf galaxies, ASASSN-15lh appears to be hosted by a luminous galaxy (M_K ~ -25.5) with little star formation. In the 4 months since first detection, ASASSN-15lh radiated (1.1+/- 0.2)x10^52 ergs, challenging the magnetar model for its engine.
  • We present the results of the spectroscopic and photometric monitoring campaign of ASASSN-15ed. The transient was discovered quite young by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). Amateur astronomers allowed us to sample the photometric SN evolution around maximum light, which we estimate to have occurred on JD = 2457087.4 +- 0.6 in the r-band. Its apparent r-band magnitude at maximum was r = 16.91 +- 0.10, providing an absolute magnitude M(r) ~ -20.04 +- 0.20, which is slightly more luminous than the typical magnitudes estimated for Type Ibn SNe. The post-peak evolution was well monitored, and the decline rate (being in most bands around 0.1 mag/d during the first 25 d after maximum) is marginally slower than the average decline rates of SNe Ibn during the same time interval. The object was initially classified as a Type Ibn SN because early-time spectra were characterized by a blue continuum with superimposed narrow P-Cygni lines of He I, suggesting the presence of a slowly moving (1200-1500 km/s), He-rich circumstellar medium. Later on, broad P-Cygni He I lines became prominent. The inferred velocities, as measured from the minimum of the broad absorption components, were between 6000 and 7000 km/s. As we attribute these broad features to the SN ejecta, this is the first time we have observed the transition of a Type Ibn SN to a Type Ib SN.
  • We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from TRES on the FLWO 1.5m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of $2.18 M_J$, radius of $1.47 R_J$, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of 2.7908 d. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with $M_p > 2 M_J$. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 $M_\odot$, and radius of 1.43 $R_\odot$. The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests the star is a $\gamma$ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the accuracy of the planetary parameters.
  • We report the discovery of the transiting extrasolar planet HAT-P-49b. The planet transits the bright (V = 10.3) slightly evolved F-star HD 340099 with a mass of 1.54M_S and a radius of 1.83 R_S. HAT-P-49b is orbiting one of the 25 brightest stars to host a transiting planet which makes this a favorable candidate for detailed follow-up. This system is an especially strong target for Rossiter- McLaughlin follow-up due to the fast rotation of the host star, 16 km/s. The planetary companion has a period of 2.6915 d, mass of 1.73 M_J and radius of 1.41 R_J. The planetary characteristics are consistent with that of a classical hot Jupiter but we note that this is the fourth most massive star to host a transiting planet with both M_p and R_p well determined.
  • We use multi-wavelength microlensing measurements of a sample of 10 image pairs from 8 lensed quasars to study the structure of their accretion disks. By using spectroscopy or narrow band photometry we have been able to remove contamination from the weakly microlensed broad emission lines, extinction and any uncertainties in the large-scale macro magnification of the lens model. We determine a maximum likelihood estimate for the exponent of the size versus wavelength scaling ($r_s\propto \lambda^p$ corresponding to a disk temperature profile of $T\propto r^{-1/p}$) of $p=0.75^{+0.2}_{-0.2}$, and a Bayesian estimate of $p=0.8\pm0.2$, which are significantly smaller than the prediction of thin disk theory ($p=4/3$). We have also obtained a maximum likelihood estimate for the average quasar accretion disk size of $r_s=4.5^{+1.5}_{-1.2} $ lt-day at a rest frame wavelength of $\lambda = 1026~{\mathrm \AA}$ for microlenses with a mean mass of $M=1 M_\sun$, in agreement with previous results, and larger than expected from thin disk theory.
  • We measure the differential microlensing of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission line blends between 14 quasar image pairs in 13 gravitational lenses. We find that the UV iron emission is strongly microlensed in 4 cases with amplitudes comparable to that of the continuum. Statistically modeling the magnifications we infer a typical size of r ~ 4*sqrt(M/Msun) light-days for the Fe line emitting regions which is comparable to the size of the region generating the UV continuum (3 ~ 7 light-days). This may indicate that a significant part of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission originates in the quasar accretion disk.
  • We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V=13.2, 12.8 and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.39, 0.89, and 0.49 Mjup, and radii of 1.28, 1.43, and 1.28 Rjup. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 Msun. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 220 d and a minimum mass of 1.6 Mjup. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out an alternative solution for the outer planet having a period of 438 d and a minimum mass of 3.7 Mjup. For HAT-P-45 at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model, in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 +- 6.3 m/s is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 d and a minimum mass of 2.0 Mjup, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued RV monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters.
  • We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that high ionization lines such as CIV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region radius of 24 (-15/+22) and 55 (-35/+150) light-days (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the sample is divided attending to quasar luminosity, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.
  • First identified from the HATNet wide-field photometric survey, these candidate transiting planets were then followed-up with a variety of photometric observations. Determining the planetary nature of the objects and characterizing the parameters of the systems were mainly done with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93m telescope at OHP and the TRES spectrograph at the 1.5m telescope at FLWO. HAT-P-42b and HAT-P-43b are typical hot Jupiters on circular orbits around early-G/late-F main sequence host stars, with periods of 4.641876\pm0.000032 and 3.332688\pm0.000016 days, masses of 0.975\pm0.126 and 0.660\pm0.083 Mjup, and radii of 1.277\pm0.149 and 1.283+0.057-0.034 Rjup, respectively. These discoveries increase the sample of planets with measured mean densities, which is needed to constrain theories of planetary interiors and atmospheres. Moreover, their hosts are relatively bright (V < 13.5) facilitating further follow-up studies.
  • We report on a program of spectroscopic observations of gravitationally-lensed QSOs with multiple images. We seek to establish whether microlensing is occurring in each QSO image using only single-epoch observations. We calculate flux ratios for the cores of emission lines in image pairs to set a baseline for no microlensing. The offset of the continuum flux ratios relative to this baseline yields the microlensing magnification free from extinction, as extinction affects the continuum and the lines equally. When we find chromatic microlensing, we attempt to constrain the size of the QSO accretion disk. SDSSJ1004+4112 and HE1104-1805 show chromatic microlensing with amplitudes $0.2< |\Delta m| < 0.6$ and $0.2< |\Delta m| < 0.4$ mag, respectively. Modeling the accretion disk with a Gaussian source ($I\propto \exp(-R^2/2r_s^2)$) of size $r_s\propto \lambda^p$ and using magnification maps to simulate microlensing we find $r_s(\lambda 3363)=7\pm3 light-days (18.1\pm7.8 \times 10^{15} cm$) and $p=1.1\pm 0.4$ for SDSS1004+4112, and $r_s(\lambda 3363)=6\pm2 light-days (15.5\pm5.2 \times 10^{15} cm$) and $p=0.7\pm0.1$ for HE1104-1805. For SDSSJ1029+2623 we find strong chromaticity of $\sim 0.4$ mag in the continuum flux ratio, which probably arises from microlensing although not all the available data fit within this explanation. For Q0957+561 we measure B-A magnitude differences of 0.4 mag, much greater than the $\sim$0.05 mag amplitude usually inferred from lightcurve variability. It may substantially modify the current interpretations of microlensing in this system, likely favoring the hypothesis of smaller sources and/or larger microdeflectors. For HS0818+1227, our data yield posible evidence of microlensing.
  • Using a sample of high-redshift lensed quasars from the CASTLES project with observed-frame ultraviolet or optical and near-infrared spectra, we have searched for possible biases between supermassive black hole (BH) mass estimates based on the CIV, Halpha and Hbeta broad emission lines. Our sample is based upon that of Greene, Peng & Ludwig, expanded with new near-IR spectroscopic observations, consistently analyzed high S/N optical spectra, and consistent continuum luminosity estimates at 5100A. We find that BH mass estimates based on the FWHM of CIV show a systematic offset with respect to those obtained from the line dispersion, sigma_l, of the same emission line, but not with those obtained from the FWHM of Halpha and Hbeta. The magnitude of the offset depends on the treatment of the HeII and FeII emission blended with CIV, but there is little scatter for any fixed measurement prescription. While we otherwise find no systematic offsets between CIV and Balmer line mass estimates, we do find that the residuals between them are strongly correlated with the ratio of the UV and optical continuum luminosities. Removing this dependency reduces the scatter between the UV- and optical-based BH mass estimates by a factor of approximately 2, from roughly 0.35 to 0.18 dex. The dispersion is smallest when comparing the CIV sigma_l mass estimate, after removing the offset from the FWHM estimates, and either Balmer line mass estimate. The correlation with the continuum slope is likely due to a combination of reddening, host contamination and object-dependent SED shapes. When we add additional heterogeneous measurements from the literature, the results are unchanged.
  • We estimate the fraction of mass that is composed of compact objects in gravitational lens galaxies. This study is based on microlensing measurements (obtained from the literature) of a sample of 29 quasar image pairs seen through 20 lens galaxies. We determine the baseline for no microlensing magnification between two images from the ratios of emission line fluxes. Relative to this baseline, the ratio between the continua of the two images gives the difference in microlensing magnification. The histogram of observed microlensing events peaks close to no magnification and is concentrated below 0.6 magnitudes, although two events of high magnification, $\Delta m \sim 1.5$, are also present. We study the likelihood of the microlensing measurements using frequency distributions obtained from simulated microlensing magnification maps for different values of the fraction of mass in compact objects, $\alpha$. The concentration of microlensing measurements close to $\Delta m \sim 0$ can be explained only by simulations corresponding to very low values of $\alpha$ (10% or less). A maximum likelihood test yields $\alpha=0.05_{-0.03}^{+0.09}$ (90% confidence interval) for a quasar continuum source of intrinsic size $r_{s_0}\sim 2.6 \cdot 10^{15} \rm cm$. Regarding the current controversy about Milky Way/LMC and M31 microlensing studies, our work supports the hypothesis of a very low content in MACHOS (Massive Compact Halo Objects).
  • We have measured the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the host galaxy of the z_s=1.7 gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112 from 0.44-8.0 micron (0.16-3.0 micron in the rest frame). The large angular extent of the lensed images and their separation from the centralgalaxy of this cluster lens allows the images to be resolved even with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Based on the SED, the host galaxy is a mixture of relatively old and intermediate age stars with an inferred stellar mass of log(M_stars/M_sun)=11.09+/-0.28 and a star formation rate of log(Mdot/1 M_sun per yr)=1.21+/-0.26. Given the estimated black hole mass of M_BH ~10^8.6 M_sun from locally-calibrated correlations of black hole masses with line widths and luminosities, the black hole represents a fraction log(M_BH/M_stars) = -2.49+/-0.28 of the stellar mass and it is radiating at 0.24+/-0.05 of the Eddington limit. The ratio of the host stellar mass to the black hole mass is only marginally consistent with the locally observed ratio.
  • We present extensive early photometric (ultraviolet through near-infrared) and spectroscopic (optical and near-infrared) data on supernova (SN) 2008D as well as X-ray data analysis on the associated Swift/X-ray transient (XRT) 080109. Our data span a time range of 5 hours before the detection of the X-ray transient to 150 days after its detection, and detailed analysis allowed us to derive constraints on the nature of the SN and its progenitor; throughout we draw comparisons with results presented in the literature and find several key aspects that differ. We show that the X-ray spectrum of XRT 080109 can be fit equally well by an absorbed power law or a superposition of about equal parts of both power law and blackbody. Our data first established that SN 2008D is a spectroscopically normal SN Ib (i.e., showing conspicuous He lines), and show that SN 2008D had a relatively long rise time of 18 days and a modest optical peak luminosity. The early-time light curves of the SN are dominated by a cooling stellar envelope (for \Delta t~0.1- 4 day, most pronounced in the blue bands) followed by 56^Ni decay. We construct a reliable measurement of the bolometric output for this stripped-envelope SN, and, combined with estimates of E_K and M_ej from the literature, estimate the stellar radius R_star of its probable Wolf-Rayet progenitor. According to the model of Waxman et al. and of Chevalier & Fransson, we derive R_star^{W07}= 1.2+/-0.7 R_sun and R_star^{CF08}= 12+/-7 R_sun, respectively; the latter being more in line with typical WN stars. Spectra obtained at 3 and 4 months after maximum light show double-peaked oxygen lines that we associate with departures from spherical symmetry, as has been suggested for the inner ejecta of a number of SN Ib cores.