• The oxygen-bearing molecular ions OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ are key species that probe the ionization rate of (partially) molecular gas that is ionized by X-rays and cosmic rays permeating the interstellar medium. We report Herschel far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopic observations of OH+ in Mrk 231, showing both ground-state P-Cygni profiles, and excited line profiles with blueshifted absorption wings extending up to ~1000 km s^{-1}. In addition, OH+ probes an excited component peaking at central velocities, likely arising from the torus probed by the OH centimeter-wave megamaser. Four lines of H2O+ are also detected at systemic velocities, but H3O+ is undetected. Based on our earlier OH studies, we estimate an abundance ratio of OH/OH+~5-10 for the outflowing components and ~20 for the torus, and an OH+ abundance relative to H nuclei of ~>10^{-7}. We also find high OH+/H2O+ and OH+/H3O+ ratios, both are ~>4 in the torus and ~>10-20 in the outflowing gas components. Chemical models indicate that these high OH+ abundances relative to OH, H2O+, and H3O+ are characteristic of gas with a high ionization rate per unit density, \zeta/n_H~(1-5)x10^{-17} cm^3 s^{-1} and ~(1-2)x10^{-16} cm^3 s^{-1} for the above components, respectively, and an ionization rate of \zeta~(0.5-2)x10^{-12} s^{-1}. X-rays appear to be unable to explain the inferred ionization rate, and thus we suggest that low-energy (10-400 MeV) cosmic-rays are primarily responsible for the ionization with \dot{M}_{CR}~0.01 M_{sun} yr^{-1} and \dot{E}_{CR}~10^{44} erg s^{-1}, the latter corresponding to 1% of the AGN luminosity and similar to the energetics of the molecular outflow. We suggest that cosmic-rays accelerated in the forward shock associated with the molecular outflow are responsible for the ionization, as they diffuse through the outflowing molecular phase downstream.
  • The SHINING survey (Paper I; Herrera-Camus et al. 2018) offers a great opportunity to study the properties of the ionized and neutral media of galaxies from prototypical starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN) to heavily obscured objects. Based on Herschel/PACS observations of the main far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure lines, in this paper we analyze the physical mechanisms behind the observed line deficits in galaxies, the apparent offset of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the mass-metallicity relation, and the scaling relations between [CII] 158 $\mu$m line emission and star formation rate (SFR). Based on a toy model and the Cloudy code, we conclude that the increase in the ionization parameter with FIR surface brightness can explain the observed decrease in the line-to-FIR continuum ratio of galaxies. In the case of the [CII] line, the increase in the ionization parameter is accompanied by a reduction in the photoelectric heating efficiency and the inability of the line to track the increase in the FUV radiation field as galaxies become more compact and luminous. In the central $\sim$kiloparsec regions of AGN galaxies we observe a significant increase in the [OI] 63 $\mu$m/[CII] line ratio; the AGN impact on the line-to-FIR ratios fades on global scales. Based on extinction-insensitive metallicity measurements of LIRGs we confirm that they lie below the mass-metallicity relation, but the offset is smaller than those reported in studies that use optical-based metal abundances. Finally, we present scaling relations between [CII] emission and SFR in the context of the main-sequence of star-forming galaxies.
  • We use the Herschel/PACS spectrometer to study the global and spatially resolved far-infrared (FIR) fine-structure line emission in a sample of 52 galaxies that constitute the SHINING survey. These galaxies include star-forming, active-galactic nuclei (AGN), and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). We find an increasing number of galaxies (and kiloparsec size regions within galaxies) with low line-to-FIR continuum ratios as a function of increasing FIR luminosity ($L_{\mathrm{FIR}}$), dust infrared color, $L_{\mathrm{FIR}}$ to molecular gas mass ratio ($L_{\mathrm{FIR}}/M_{\mathrm{mol}}$), and FIR surface brightness ($\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}$). The correlations between the [CII]/FIR or [OI]/FIR ratios with $\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}$ are remarkably tight ($\sim0.3$ dex scatter over almost four orders of magnitude in $\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}$). We observe that galaxies with $L_{\mathrm{FIR}}/M_{\mathrm{mol}} \gtrsim 80\,L_{\odot}\,M_{\odot}^{-1}$ and $\Sigma_{\mathrm{FIR}}\gtrsim10^{11}$ $L_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$ tend to have weak fine-structure line-to-FIR continuum ratios, and that LIRGs with infrared sizes $\gtrsim1$ kpc have line-to-FIR ratios comparable to those observed in typical star-forming galaxies. We analyze the physical mechanisms driving these trends in Paper II (Herrera-Camus et al. 2018). The combined analysis of the [CII], [NII], and [OIII] lines reveals that the fraction of the [CII] line emission that arises from neutral gas increases from 60% to 90% in the most active star-forming regions and that the emission originating in the ionized gas is associated with low-ionization, diffuse gas rather than with dense gas in HII regions. Finally, we report the global and spatially resolved line fluxes of the SHINING galaxies to enable the comparison and planning of future local and high-$z$ studies.
  • We present the Herschel-SPIRE photometric atlas for a complete flux limited sample of 43 local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs), selected at 60${\mu}$m by IRAS, as part of the HERschel ULIRG Survey (HERUS). Photometry observations were obtained using the SPIRE instrument at 250, 350 and 500${\mu}$m. We describe these observations, present the results, and combine the new observations with data from IRAS to examine the far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources. We fit the observed SEDs of HERUS objects with a simple parameterised modified black body model where temperature and emissivity $\beta$ are free parameters. We compare the fitted values to those of non-ULIRG local galaxies, and find, in agreement with earlier results, that HERUS ULIRGs have warmer dust (median temperature T = 37.9+/-4.7 K compared to 21.3+/-3.4 K) but a similar $\beta$ distribution (median $\beta$ = 1.7 compared to 1.8) to the Herschel reference sample (HRS, Cortese et al., 2014) galaxies. Dust masses are found to be in the range of 10^7.5 to 10^9 Msun significantly higher than that of Herschel Reference Sample (HRS) sources. We compare our results for local ULIRGs with higher redshift samples selected at 250 and 850${\mu}$m. These latter sources generally have cooler dust and/or redder 100-to-250 ${\mu}$m colours than our 60${\mu}$m-selected ULIRGs. We show that this difference may in part be the result of the sources being selected at different wavelengths rather than being a simple indication of rapid evolution in the properties of the population.
  • The SPICA mid and far-infrared telescope will address fundamental issues in our understanding of star formation and ISM physics in galaxies. A particular hallmark of SPICA is the outstanding sensitivity enabled by the cold telescope, optimized detectors, and wide instantaneous bandwidth throughout the mid- and far-infrared. The spectroscopic, imaging and polarimetric observations that SPICA will be able to collect will help in clarifying the complex physical mechanisms which underlie the baryon cycle of galaxies. In particular: (i) The access to a large suite of atomic and ionic fine-structure lines for large samples of galaxies will shed light on the origin of the observed spread in star formation rates within and between galaxies. (ii) Observations of HD rotational lines (out to $\sim$10 Mpc) and fine structure lines such as [CII] 158 $\mu$m (out to $\sim$100 Mpc) will clarify the main reservoirs of interstellar matter in galaxies, including phases where CO does not emit. (iii) Far-infrared spectroscopy of dust and ice features will address uncertainties in the mass and composition of dust in galaxies, and the contributions of supernovae to the interstellar dust budget will be quantified by photometry and monitoring of supernova remnants in nearby galaxies. (iv) Observations of far-infrared cooling lines such as [OI] 63 $\mu$m from star-forming molecular clouds in our Galaxy will evaluate the importance of shocks to dissipate turbulent energy. The paper concludes with requirements for the telescope and instruments, and recommendations for the observing strategy.
  • Feedback in the form of mass outflows driven by star formation or active galactic nuclei is a key component of galaxy evolution. The luminous infrared galaxy Zw 049.057 harbours a compact obscured nucleus with a possible far-IR signature of outflowing molecular gas. Due to the high optical depths at far-IR wavelengths, the interpretation of the outflow signature is uncertain. At mm and radio wavelengths, the radiation is better able to penetrate the large columns of gas and dust. We used high resolution observations from the SMA, ALMA, and the VLA to image the CO 2-1 and 6-5 emission, the 690 GHz continuum, the radio cm continuum, and absorptions by rotationally excited OH. The CO line profiles exhibit wings extending 300 km/s beyond the systemic velocity. At cm wavelengths, we find a compact (40 pc) continuum component in the nucleus, with weaker emission extending several 100 pc approximately along the major and minor axes of the galaxy. In the OH absorption lines toward the compact continuum, wings extending to a similar velocity as for the CO are seen on the blue side of the profile. The weak cm continuum emission along the minor axis is aligned with a highly collimated, jet-like dust feature previously seen in near-IR images of the galaxy. Comparison of the apparent optical depths in the OH lines indicate that the excitation conditions in Zw 049.057 differ from those in other OH megamaser galaxies. We interpret the wings in the spectral lines as signatures of a molecular outflow. A relation between this outflow and the minor axis radio feature is possible, although further studies are required to investigate this possible association and understand the connection between the outflow and the nuclear activity. Finally, we suggest that the differing OH excitation conditions are further evidence that Zw 049.057 is in a transition phase between megamaser and kilomaser activity.
  • Our current knowledge of star formation and accretion luminosity at high-redshift (z>3-4), as well as the possible connections between them, relies mostly on observations in the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), which are strongly affected by dust obscuration. Due to the lack of sensitivity of past and current infrared (IR) instrumentation, so far it has not been possible to get a glimpse into the early phases of the dust-obscured Universe. Among the next generation of IR observatories, SPICA, observing in the 12-350 micron range, will be the only facility that can enable us to make the required leap forward in understanding the obscured star-formation rate and black-hole accretion rate densities (SFRD and BHARD, respectively) with respect to what Spitzer and Herschel achieved in the mid- and far-IR at z<3. In particular, SPICA will have the unique ability to trace the evolution of the obscured SFRD and BHARD over cosmic time, from the peak of their activity back to the reionisation epoch (i.e., 3<z<6-7), where its predecessors had severe limitations. Here we discuss the potential of both deep and shallow photometric surveys performed with the SPICA mid-IR instrument (SMI), enabled by the very low level of impact of dust obscuration in a band centred at 34 micron. These unique unbiased photometric surveys that SPICA will perform will be followed up by observations both with the SPICA spectrometers and with other facilities at shorter and longer wavelengths, with the aim to fully characterise the evolution of AGNs and star-forming galaxies after re-ionisation.
  • A far-infrared observatory such as the {\it SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics} ({\it SPICA}), with its unprecedented spectroscopic sensitivity, would unveil the role of feedback in galaxy evolution during the last $\sim10$ Gyr of the Universe ($z=1.5-2$), through the use of far- and mid-infrared molecular and ionic fine structure lines that trace outflowing and infalling gas. Outflowing gas is identified in the far-infrared through P-Cygni line shapes and absorption blueshifted wings in molecular lines with high dipolar moments, and through emission line wings of fine-structure lines of ionized gas. We quantify the detectability of galaxy-scale massive molecular and ionized outflows as a function of redshift in AGN-dominated, starburst-dominated, and main-sequence galaxies, explore the detectability of metal-rich inflows in the local Universe, and describe the most significant synergies with other current and future observatories that will measure feedback in galaxies via complementary tracers at other wavelengths.
  • The physical processes driving the chemical evolution of galaxies in the last $\sim 11\, \rm{Gyr}$ cannot be understood without directly probing the dust-obscured phase of star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei. This phase, hidden to optical tracers, represents the bulk of star formation and black hole accretion activity in galaxies at $1 < z < 3$. Spectroscopic observations with a cryogenic infrared (IR) observatory like SPICA will be sensitive enough to peer through the dust-obscured regions of galaxies and access the rest-frame mid- to far-IR range in galaxies at high-$z$. This wavelength range contains a unique suite of spectral lines and dust features that serve as proxies for the abundances of heavy elements and the dust composition, providing tracers with a feeble response to both extinction and temperature. In this work, we investigate how SPICA observations could be exploited to understand key aspects in the chemical evolution of galaxies: the assembly of nearby galaxies based on the spatial distribution of heavy element abundances, the global content of metals in galaxies reaching the knee of the luminosity function up to $z \sim 3$, and the dust composition of galaxies at high-$z$. Possible synergies with facilities available in the late 2020s are also discussed.
  • IR spectroscopy in the range 12-230 micron with the SPace IR telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will reveal the physical processes that govern the formation and evolution of galaxies and black holes through cosmic time, bridging the gap between the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) at shorter wavelengths and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at longer wavelengths. SPICA, with its 2.5-m telescope actively-cooled to below 8K, will obtain the first spectroscopic determination, in the mid-IR rest-frame, of both the star-formation rate and black hole accretion rate histories of galaxies, reaching lookback times of 12 Gyr, for large statistically significant samples. Densities, temperatures, radiation fields and gas-phase metallicities will be measured in dust-obscured galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN), sampling a large range in mass and luminosity, from faint local dwarf galaxies to luminous quasars in the distant Universe. AGN and starburst feedback and feeding mechanisms in distant galaxies will be uncovered through detailed measurements of molecular and atomic line profiles. SPICA's large-area deep spectrophotometric surveys will provide mid-IR spectra and continuum fluxes for unbiased samples of tens of thousands of galaxies, out to redshifts of z~6. Furthermore, SPICA spectroscopy will uncover the most luminous galaxies in the first few hundred million years of the Universe, through their characteristic dust and molecular hydrogen features.
  • (abridged) We present the IRAM-30m observations of multiple-J CO and CI line emission in a sample of redshift ~2-4 Herschel-ATLAS SMGs. A non-negligible effect of differential lensing is found for the CO emission lines, which could have caused significant underestimations of the linewidths, hence of the dynamical masses. The CO SLEDs are found to be similar to those of the local starburst-dominated ULIRGs and of the previously studied SMGs. After correcting for lensing amplification, we derived the global properties of the bulk of molecular gas in the SMGs using non-LTE radiative transfer modelling. The gas thermal pressure is found to be correlated with star formation efficiency. Further decomposing the CO SLEDs into two excitation components, we find a low-excitation component, which is less correlated with star formation, and a high-excitation one which is tightly related to the on-going star-forming activity. Additionally, tight linear correlations between the FIR and CO line luminosities have been confirmed for the $J \ge 5$ CO lines, implying that these CO lines are good tracers of star formation. The [CI](2-1) lines follow the tight linear correlation between the luminosities of the [CI](2-1) and the CO(1-0) line found in local starbursts, indicating that CI lines could serve as good total molecular gas mass tracers for high-redshift SMGs. The total mass of the molecular gas reservoir, $(1-30) \times 10^{10} M_\odot$, suggests a typical molecular gas depletion time ~20-100 Myr and a gas to dust mass ratio ${\delta}_{\rm GDR}$~30-100. The ratio between CO line luminosity and the dust mass appears to be slowly increasing with redshift for the SMGs, which need to be further confirmed. Finally, through comparing the linewidth of CO and H2O lines, we find that they agree well in almost all our SMGs, confirming that the emitting regions are co-spatially located.
  • In Tombesi et al. (2015), we reported the first direct evidence for a quasar accretion disk wind driving a massive molecular outflow. The target was F11119+3257, an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) with unambiguous type-1 quasar optical broad emission lines. The energetics of the accretion disk wind and molecular outflow were found to be consistent with the predictions of quasar feedback models where the molecular outflow is driven by a hot energy-conserving bubble inflated by the inner quasar accretion disk wind. However, this conclusion was uncertain because the energetics were estimated from the optically thick OH 119 um transition profile observed with Herschel. Here, we independently confirm the presence of the molecular outflow in F11119+3257, based on the detection of broad wings in the CO(1-0) profile derived from ALMA observations. The broad CO(1-0) line emission appears to be spatially extended on a scale of at least ~7 kpc from the center. Mass outflow rate, momentum flux, and mechanical power of (80-200) R_7^{-1} M_sun/yr, (1.5-3.0) R_7^{-1} L_AGN/c, and (0.15-0.40)% R_7^{-1} L_AGN are inferred from these data, assuming a CO-to-H_2 conversion factor appropriate for a ULIRG (R_7 is the radius of the outflow normalized to 7 kpc and L_AGN is the AGN luminosity). These rates are time-averaged over a flow time scale of 7x10^6 yrs. They are similar to the OH-based rates time-averaged over a flow time scale of 4x10^5 yrs, but about a factor 4 smaller than the local ("instantaneous"; <10^5 yrs) OH-based estimates cited in Tombesi et al. The implications of these new results are discussed in the context of time-variable quasar-mode feedback and galaxy evolution. The need for an energy-conserving bubble to explain the molecular outflow is also re-examined.
  • We present the first detection of the ortho-H2O 4_23-3_30 transition at 448 GHz in space. We observed this transition in the local (z = 0.010) luminous infrared (IR) galaxy ESO 320-G030 (IRAS F11506-3851) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The water 4_23-3_30 emission, which originates in the highly obscured nucleus of this galaxy, is spatially resolved over a region of ~65 pc in diameter and shows a regular rotation pattern compatible with the global molecular and ionized gas kinematics. The line profile is symmetric and well fitted by a Gaussian with an integrated flux of 37.0 +- 0.7 Jy km s-1 . Models predict this water transition as a potential collisionally excited maser transition. On the contrary, in this galaxy, we find that the 4_23-3_30 emission is primarily excited by the intense far-IR radiation field present in its nucleus. According to our modeling, this transition is a probe of deeply buried galaxy nuclei thanks to the high dust optical depths (tau_100{\mu}m > 1, N_H > 1e24 cm-2) required to efficiently excite it.
  • We report on the energetics of molecular outflows in 14 local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that show unambiguous outflow signatures (P-Cygni profiles or high-velocity absorption wings) in the far-infrared lines of OH measured with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer. Detection of both ground-state (at 119 and 79 um) and one or more radiatively-excited (at 65 and 84 um) lines allows us to model the nuclear gas (<~300 pc) as well as the more extended components using spherically symmetric radiative transfer models. The highest molecular outflow velocities are found in buried sources, in which slower but massive expansion of the nuclear gas is also observed. With the exception of a few outliers, the outflows have momentum fluxes of (2-5)xL_IR/c and mechanical luminosities of (0.1-0.3)% of L_IR. The moderate momentum boosts in these sources (<~3) suggest that the outflows are mostly momentum-driven by the combined effects of AGN and nuclear starbursts, as a result of radiation pressure, winds, and supernovae remnants. In some sources (~20%), however, powerful (10^{10.5-11} Lsun) AGN feedback and (partially) energy-conserving phases are required, with momentum boosts in the range 3-20. These outflows appear to be stochastic strong-AGN feedback events that occur throughout the merging process. In a few sources, the outflow activity in the innermost regions has subsided in the last ~1 Myr. While OH traces the molecular outflows at sub-kpc scales, comparison of the masses traced by OH with those previously inferred from tracers of more extended outflowing gas suggests that most mass is loaded (with loading factors of Mdot/SFR=1-10) from the central galactic cores (a few x 100 pc). Outflow depletion timescales are <10^8 yr, shorter than the gas consumption timescales by factors of 1.1-15, and are anti-correlated with the AGN luminosity.
  • We present new ALMA Band 7 ($\sim340$ GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO$^+$, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120-5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4-3) emission, relative to HCO$^+$ (4-3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of $\sim1.2$ yr$^{-1}$, the high HCN/HCO$^+$ ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high $\Sigma_{IR}$ of $4.7\times10^{12}$ $L_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H$_2$O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of $\sim40$ K. IRAS 13120-5453 has a lower dust temperature and $\Sigma_{IR}$ than is inferred for the systems termed "compact obscured nuclei" (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120-5453 has undergone a compact obscured nucleus phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/AGN core.
  • Aims. We probe the physical conditions in the core of Arp 299A and try to put constraints to the nature of its nuclear power source. Methods. We used Herschel Space Observatory far-infrared and submillimeter observations of H2O and OH rotational lines in Arp 299A to create a multi-component model of the galaxy. In doing this, we employed a spherically symmetric radiative transfer code. Results. Nine H2O lines in absorption and eight in emission as well as four OH doublets in absorption and one in emission, are detected in Arp 299A. No lines of the 18O isotopologues, which have been seen in compact obscured nuclei of other galaxies, are detected. The absorption in the ground state OH doublet at 119 {\mu}m is found redshifted by ~175 km/s compared to other OH and H2O lines, suggesting a low excitation inflow. We find that at least two components are required in order to account for the excited molecular line spectrum. The inner component has a radius of 20-25 pc, a very high infrared surface brightness (> 3e13 Lsun/kpc^2), warm dust (Td > 90 K), and a large H2 column density (NH2 > 1e24 cm^-2). The outer component is larger (50-100 pc) with slightly cooler dust (70-90 K). In addition, a much more extended inflowing component is required to also account for the OH doublet at 119 {\mu}m. Conclusions. The Compton-thick nature of the core makes it difficult to determine the nature of the buried power source, but the high surface brightness indicates that it is either an active galactic nucleus and/or a dense nuclear starburst. The high OH/H2O ratio in the nucleus indicates that ion-neutral chemistry induced by X-rays or cosmic-rays is important. Finally we find a lower limit to the 16O/18O ratio of 400 in the nuclear region, possibly indicating that the nuclear starburst is in an early evolutionary stage, or that it is fed through a molecular inflow of, at most, solar metallicity.
  • (abridged) We report rest-frame submillimeter H2O emission line observations of 11 HyLIRGs/ULIRGs at z~2-4 selected among the brightest lensed galaxies discovered in the Herschel-ATLAS. Using the IRAM NOEMA, we have detected 14 new H2O emission lines. The apparent luminosities of the H2O emission lines are $\mu L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim 6-21 \times 10^8 L_\odot$, with velocity-integrated line fluxes ranging from 4-15 Jy km s$^{-1}$. We have also observed CO emission lines using EMIR on the IRAM 30m telescope in seven sources. The velocity widths for CO and H2O lines are found to be similar. With almost comparable integrated flux densities to those of the high-J CO line, H2O is found to be among the strongest molecular emitters in high-z Hy/ULIRGs. We also confirm our previously found correlation between luminosity of H2O ($L_{\rm{H_2O}}$) and infrared ($L_{\rm{IR}}$) that $L_{\rm{H_2O}} \sim L_{\rm{IR}}^{1.1-1.2}$, with our new detections. This correlation could be explained by a dominant role of far-infrared (FIR) pumping in the H2O excitation. Modelling reveals the FIR radiation fields have warm dust temperature $T_\rm{warm}$~45-75 K, H2O column density per unit velocity interval $N_{\rm{H_2O}}/\Delta V \gtrsim 0.3 \times 10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$ km$^{-1}$ s and 100 $\mu$m continuum opacity $\tau_{100} > 1$ (optically thick), indicating that H2O is likely to trace highly obscured warm dense gas. However, further observations of $J\geq4$ H2O lines are needed to better constrain the continuum optical depth and other physical conditions of the molecular gas and dust. We have also detected H2O+ emission in three sources. A tight correlation between $L_{\rm{H_2O}}$ and $L_{\rm{H_2O^+}}$ has been found in galaxies from low to high redshift. The velocity-integrated flux density ratio between H2O+ and H2O suggests that cosmic rays generated by strong star formation are possibly driving the H2O+ formation.
  • We present the results from a systematic search for galactic-scale, molecular (OH 119 $\mu$m) outflows in a sample of 52 Local Volume ($d < 50$ Mpc) Burst Alert Telescope detected active galactic nuclei (BAT AGN) with \emph{Herschel}-PACS. We combine the results from our analysis of the BAT AGN with the published \emph{Herschel}/PACS data of 43 nearby ($z<0.3$) galaxy mergers, mostly ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and QSOs. The objects in our sample of BAT AGN have, on average, $\sim 10-100$ times lower AGN luminosities, star formation rates (SFRs), and stellar masses than those of the ULIRG and QSO sample. OH 119 $\mu$m is detected in 42 of our BAT AGN targets. Evidence for molecular outflows (i.e. OH absorption profiles with median velocities more blueshifted than $-$50 km s$^{-1}$ and/or blueshifted wings with 84-percentile velocities less than $-$300 km s$^{-1}$) is seen in only four BAT AGN (NGC~7479 is the most convincing case). Evidence for molecular inflows (i.e. OH absorption profiles with median velocities more redshifted than 50 km s$^{-1}$) is seen in seven objects, although an inverted P-Cygni profile is detected unambiguously in only one object (Circinus). Our data show that both the starburst and AGN contribute to driving OH outflows, but the fastest OH winds require AGN with quasar-like luminosities. We also confirm that the total absorption strength of OH 119 $\mu$m is a good proxy for dust optical depth as it correlates strongly with the 9.7 $\mu$m silicate absorption feature, a measure of obscuration originating in both the nuclear torus and host galaxy disk.
  • We report a tentative correlation between the outflow characteristics derived from OH absorption at $119\,\mu\text{m}$ and [CII] emission at $158\,\mu\text{m}$ in a sample of 22 local and bright ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). For this sample we investigate whether [CII] broad wings are a good tracer of molecular outflows, and how the two tracers are connected. Fourteen objects in our sample have a broad wing component as traced by [CII], and all of these also show OH119 absorption indicative of an outflow (in 1 case an inflow). The other eight cases, where no broad [CII] component was found, are predominantly objects with no OH outflow or a low-velocity ($\leq 100\,\text{km s}^{-1}$) OH outflow. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the broad [CII] component shows a trend with the OH119 blue-shifted velocity, although with significant scatter. Moreover, and despite large uncertainties, the outflow masses derived from OH and broad [CII] show a 1:1 relation. The main conclusion is therefore that broad [CII] wings can be used to trace molecular outflows. This may be particularly relevant at high redshift, where the usual tracers of molecular gas (like low-J CO lines) become hard to observe. Additionally, observations of blue-shifted Na I D $\lambda\lambda 5890,5896$ absorption are available for ten of our sources. Outflow velocities of Na I D show a trend with OH velocity and broad [CII] FWHM. These observations suggest that the atomic and molecular gas phases of the outflow are connected.
  • We explore the potential of imaging vibrationally excited molecular emission at high angular resolution to better understand the morphology and physical structure of the dense gas in Arp~220 and to gain insight into the nature of the nuclear powering sources. Vibrationally excited emission of HCN is detected in both nuclei with a very high ratio relative to the total $L_{FIR}$, higher than in any other observed galaxy and well above what is observed in Galactic hot cores. HCN $v_2=1f$ is observed to be marginally resolved in $\sim60\times50$~pc regions inside the dusty $\sim100$~pc sized nuclear cores. Its emission is centered on our derived individual nuclear velocities based on HCO$^+$ emission ($V_{WN}=5342\pm4$ and $V_{EN}=5454\pm8$~\kms, for the western and eastern nucleus, respectively). With virial masses within $r\sim25-30$~pc based on the HCN~$v_2=1f$ line widths, we estimate gas surface densities (gas fraction $f_g=0.1$) of $3\pm0.3\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (WN) and $1.1\pm0.1\times10^4~M_\odot~\rm pc^{-2}$ (EN). The $4-3/3-2$ flux density ratio could be consistent with optically thick emission, which would further constrain the size of the emitting region to $>15$~pc (EN) and $>22$~pc (WN). The absorption systems that may hide up to $70\%$ of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission are found at velocities of $-50$~\kms~(EN) and $6$, $-140$, and $-575$~\kms (WN) relative to velocities of the nuclei. Blueshifted absorptions are the evidence of outflowing motions from both nuclei. The bright vibrational emission implies the existence of a hot dust region radiatively pumping these transitions. We find evidence of a strong temperature gradient that would be responsible for both the HCN $v_2$ pumping and the absorbed profiles from the vibrational ground state as a result of both continuum and self-absorption by cooler foreground gas.
  • We discuss the dense molecular gas in central regions of nearby Seyfert galaxies, and report new arcsec resolution observations of HCN(1-0) and HCO$^+$(1-0) for 3 objects. In NGC 3079 the lines show complex profiles as a result of self-absorption and saturated continuum absorption. H$^{13}$CN reveals the continuum absorption profile, with a peak close to the galaxy's systemic velocity that traces disk rotation, and a second feature with a blue wing extending to $-350$km s$^{-1}$ that most likely traces a nuclear outflow. The morphological and spectral properties of the emission lines allow us to constrain the dense gas dynamics. We combine our kinematic analysis for these 3 objects, as well as another with archival data, with a previous comparable analysis of 4 other objects, to create a sample of 8 Seyferts. In 7 of these, the emission line kinematics imply thick disk structures on radial scales of $\sim$100pc, suggesting such structures are a common occurrence. We find a relation between the circumnuclear LHCN and Mdyn that can be explained by a gas fraction of 10% and a conversion factor {\alpha}HCN $\sim$ 10 between gas mass and HCN luminosity. Finally, adopting a different perspective to probe the physical properties of the gas around AGN, we report on an analysis of molecular line ratios which indicates that the clouds in this region are not self-gravitating.
  • Context. The recent detection of warm H$_2$O vapor emission from the outflows of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars challenges the current understanding of circumstellar chemistry. Two mechanisms have been invoked to explain warm H$_2$O vapor formation. In the first, periodic shocks passing through the medium immediately above the stellar surface lead to H$_2$O formation. In the second, penetration of ultraviolet interstellar radiation through a clumpy circumstellar medium leads to the formation of H$_2$O molecules in the intermediate wind. Aims. We aim to determine the properties of H$_2$O emission for a sample of 18 carbon-rich AGB stars and subsequently constrain which of the above mechanisms provides the most likely warm H$_2$O formation pathway. Methods, Results, and Conclusions. See paper.
  • Aims: Our goal is to study the chemical composition of the outflows of active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies. Methods: We obtained high-resolution interferometric observations of HCN and HCO$^+$ $J=1\rightarrow0$ and $J=2\rightarrow1$ of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Mrk~231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We also use previously published observations of HCN and HCO$^+$ $J=1\rightarrow0$ and $J=3\rightarrow2$, and HNC $J=1\rightarrow0$ in the same source. Results: In the line wings of the HCN, HCO$^+$, and HNC emission, we find that these three molecular species exhibit features at distinct velocities which differ between the species. The features are not consistent with emission lines of other molecular species. Through radiative transfer modelling of the HCN and HCO$^+$ outflow emission we find an average abundance ratio $X(\mathrm{HCN})/X(\mathrm{HCO}^+)\gtrsim1000$. Assuming a clumpy outflow, modelling of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission produces strongly inconsistent outflow masses. Conclusions: Both the anti-correlated outflow features of HCN and HCO$^+$ and the different outflow masses calculated from the radiative transfer models of the HCN and HCO$^+$ emission suggest that the outflow is chemically differentiated. The separation between HCN and HCO$^+$ could be an indicator of shock fronts present in the outflow, since the HCN/HCO$^+$ ratio is expected to be elevated in shocked regions. Our result shows that studies of the chemistry in large-scale galactic outflows can be used to better understand the physical properties of these outflows and their effects on the interstellar medium (ISM) in the galaxy.
  • Emission from high-J CO lines in galaxies has long been proposed as a tracer of X-ray dominated regions (XDRs) produced by AGN. Of particular interest is the question of whether the obscuring torus, which is required by AGN unification models, can be observed via high-J CO cooling lines. Here we report on the analysis of a deep Herschel-PACS observation of an extremely high J CO transition (40-39) in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The line was not detected, with a derived 3$\sigma$ upper limit of $2 \times 10^{-17}\,\text{W}\,\text{m}^{-2}$. We apply an XDR model in order to investigate whether the upper limit constrains the properties of a molecular torus in NGC 1068. The XDR model predicts the CO Spectral Line Energy Distributions for various gas densities and illuminating X-ray fluxes. In our model, the CO(40-39) upper limit is matched by gas with densities $\sim 10^{6}-10^{7}\,\text{cm}^{-3}$, located at $1.6-5\,\text{pc}$ from the AGN, with column densities of at least $10^{25}\,\text{cm}^{-2}$. At such high column densities, however, dust absorbs most of the CO(40-39) line emission at $\lambda = 65.69\, \mu$m. Therefore, even if NGC 1068 has a molecular torus which radiates in the CO(40-39) line, the dust can attenuate the line emission to below the PACS detection limit. The upper limit is thus consistent with the existence of a molecular torus in NGC 1068. In general, we expect that the CO(40-39) is observable in only a few AGN nuclei (if at all), because of the required high gas column density, and absorption by dust.
  • We present high resolution (0."4) IRAM PdBI and ALMA mm and submm observations of the (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) IRAS17208-0014, Arp220, IC860 and Zw049.057 that reveal intense line emission from vibrationally excited ($\nu_2$=1) J=3-2 and 4-3 HCN. The emission is emerging from buried, compact (r<17-70 pc) nuclei that have very high implied mid-infrared surface brightness $>$$5\times 10^{13}$ L$_{\odot}$ kpc$^{-2}$. These nuclei are likely powered by accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and/or hot (>200 K) extreme starbursts. Vibrational, $\nu_2$=1, lines of HCN are excited by intense 14 micron mid-infrared emission and are excellent probes of the dynamics, masses, and physical conditions of (U)LIRG nuclei when H$_2$ column densities exceed $10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$. It is clear that these lines open up a new interesting avenue to gain access to the most obscured AGNs and starbursts. Vibrationally excited HCN acts as a proxy for the absorbed mid-infrared emission from the embedded nuclei, which allows for reconstruction of the intrinsic, hotter dust SED. In contrast, we show strong evidence that the ground vibrational state ($\nu$=0), J=3-2 and 4-3 rotational lines of HCN and HCO$^+$ fail to probe the highly enshrouded, compact nuclear regions owing to strong self- and continuum absorption. The HCN and HCO$^+$ line profiles are double-peaked because of the absorption and show evidence of non-circular motions - possibly in the form of in- or outflows. Detections of vibrationally excited HCN in external galaxies are so far limited to ULIRGs and early-type spiral LIRGs, and we discuss possible causes for this. We tentatively suggest that the peak of vibrationally excited HCN emission is connected to a rapid stage of nuclear growth, before the phase of strong feedback.