• We propose that the noncentrosymmetric LiGaGe-type hexagonal $ABC$ crystal SrHgPb realizes a new type of topological semimetal that hosts both Dirac and Weyl points in momentum space. The symmetry-protected Dirac points arise due to a band inversion and are located on the sixfold rotation $z$-axis, whereas the six pairs of Weyl points related by sixfold symmetry are located on the perpendicular $k_z=0$ plane. By studying the electronic structure as a function of the buckling of the HgPb layer, which is the origin of inversion symmetry breaking, we establish that the coexistence of Dirac and Weyl fermions defines a phase separating two topologically distinct Dirac semimetals. These two Dirac semimetals are distinguished by the $\mathbb{Z}_2$ index of the $k_z=0$ plane and the corresponding presence or absence of 2D Dirac fermions on side surfaces. We formalize our first-principles calculations by deriving and studying a low-energy model Hamiltonian describing the Dirac-Weyl semimetal phase. We conclude by proposing several other materials in the non-centrosymmetric $ABC $ material class, in particular SrHgSn and CaHgSn, as candidates for realizing the Dirac-Weyl semimetal.
  • Weyl and Dirac semimetals are three dimensional phases of matter with gapless electronic excitations that are protected by topology and symmetry. As three dimensional analogs of graphene, they have generated much recent interest. Deep connections exist with particle physics models of relativistic chiral fermions, and -- despite their gaplessness -- to solid-state topological and Chern insulators. Their characteristic electronic properties lead to protected surface states and novel responses to applied electric and magnetic fields. Here we review the theoretical foundations of these phases, their proposed realizations in solid state systems, recent experiments on candidate materials, as well as their relation to other states of matter.
  • We study the frequency-dependent conductivity of nodal line semimetals (NLSMs), focusing on the effects of carrier density and energy dispersion on the nodal line. We find that the low-frequency conductivity has a rich spectral structure which can be understood using scaling rules derived from the geometry of their Dupin cyclide Fermi surfaces. We identify different frequency regimes, find scaling rules for the optical conductivity in each, and demonstrate them with numerical calculations of the inter- and intraband contributions to the optical conductivity using a low-energy model for a generic NLSM.
  • Domain walls separating regions of AB and BA interlayer stacking in bilayer graphene have attracted attention as novel examples of structural solitons, topological electronic boundaries, and nanoscale plasmonic scatterers. We show that strong coupling of domain walls to surface plasmons observed in infrared nanoimaging experiments is due to topological chiral modes confined to the walls. The optical transitions among these chiral modes and the band continua enhance the local ac conductivity, which leads to plasmon reflection by the domain walls. The imaging reveals two kinds of plasmonic standing-wave interference patterns, which we attribute to shear and tensile domain walls. We compute the electronic structure of both wall varieties and show that the tensile wall contain additional confined bands which produce a structure-specific contrast of the local conductivity. The calculated plasmonic interference profiles are in quantitative agreement with our experiments.
  • Low-energy excitations in graphene exhibit relativistic properties due to the linear dispersion relation close to the Dirac points in the first Brillouin zone. Two of the Dirac points located at opposite corners of the first Brillouin zone can be chosen as inequivalent, representing a new valley degree of freedom, in addition to the charge and spin of an electron. Using the valley degree of freedom to encode information has attracted significant interest, both theoretically and experimentally, and gave rise to the field of valleytronics. We study a graphene $p$-$n$ junction in a uniform out-of-plane magnetic field as a platform to generate and controllably manipulate the valley polarization of electrons. We show that by tuning the external potential giving rise to the $p$-$n$ junction we can switch the current from one valley polarization to the other. We also consider the effect of different types of edge terminations and present a setup, where we can partition an incoming valley-unpolarized current into two branches of valley-polarized currents. The branching ratio can be chosen by changing the location of the $p$-$n$ junction using a gate.
  • Multi-Weyl semimetals are new types of Weyl semimetals which have anisotropic non-linear energy dispersion and a topological charge larger than one, thus exhibiting a unique quantum response. Using a unified lattice model, we calculate the optical conductivity numerically in the multi-Weyl semimetal phase and in its neighboring gapped states, and obtain the characteristic frequency dependence of each phase analytically using a low-energy continuum model. The frequency dependence of longitudinal and transverse optical conductivities obeys scaling relations that are derived from the winding number of the parent multi-Weyl semimetal phase and can be used to distinguish these electronic states of matter.
  • Multi-Weyl semimetals (m-WSMs) are a new type of Weyl semimetal that have linear dispersion along one symmetry direction but anisotropic non-linear dispersion along the two transverse directions with a topological charge larger than one. Using the Boltzmann transport theory and fully incorporating the anisotropy of the system, we study the DC conductivity as a function of carrier density and temperature. We find that the characteristic density and temperature dependence of the transport coefficients at the level of Boltzmann theory are controlled by the topological charge of the multi-Weyl point and distinguish m-WSMs from their linear Weyl counterparts.
  • We study charge and spin transport along grain boundaries in single layer graphene in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field. Transport states in a grain boundary are produced by hybridization of Landau zero modes with interfacial states. In selected energy regimes quantum Hall edge states can be deflected either fully or partially into grain boundary states. The degree of edge state deflection is studied in the nonlocal conductance and in the shot noise. We also consider the possibility of grain boundaries as gate-switchable spin filters, a functionality enabled by counterpropagating transport channels laterally confined in the grain boundary.
  • We combine large-scale atomistic modelling with continuum elastic theory to study the shapes of graphene sheets embedding nanoscale kirigami. Lattice segments are selectively removed from a flat graphene sheet and the structure is allowed to close and reconstruct by relaxing in the third dimension. The surface relaxation is limited by a nonzero bending modulus which produces a smoothly modulated landscape instead of the ridge-and-plateau motif found in macroscopic lattice kirigami. The resulting surface shapes and their interactions are well described by a new set of microscopic kirigami rules that resolve the competition between the bending and stretching energies.
  • Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) are insulating materials whose topological property relies on generic crystalline symmetries. Based on first-principles calculations, we study a three-dimensional (3D) crystal constructed by stacking two-dimensional TCI layers. Depending on the inter-layer interaction, the layered crystal can realize diverse 3D topological phases characterized by two mirror Chern numbers (MCNs) ($\mu_1,\mu_2$) defined on inequivalent mirror-invariant planes in the Brillouin zone. As an example, we demonstrate that new TCI phases can be realized in layered materials such as a PbSe (001) monolayer/h-BN heterostructure and can be tuned by mechanical strain. Our results shed light on the role of the MCNs on inequivalent mirror-symmetric planes in reciprocal space and open new possibilities for finding new topological materials.
  • We show that valley degeneracy in rotationally faulted multilayer graphene may be broken in the presence of a magnetic field and interlayer commensurations. This happens due to a simultaneous breaking of both time-reversal and inversion symmetries leading to a splitting of Landau levels linear in the field. Our theoretical work is motivated by an experiment [Y. J. Song et al., Nature 467, 185 (2010)] on epitaxially grown multilayer graphene where such linear splitting of Landau levels was observed at moderate fields. We consider both bilayer and trilayer configurations and, although a linear splitting occurs in both cases, we show that the latter produces a splitting that is in quantitative agreement with the experiment.
  • Mirror symmetric surfaces of a topological crystalline insulator host even number of Dirac surface states. A surface Zeeman field generically gaps these states leading to a quantized anomalous Hall effect. Varying the direction of Zeeman field induces transitions between different surface insulating states with any two Chern numbers between -4 and 4. In the crystal frame the phase boundaries occur for field orientations which are great circles with (111)-like normals on a sphere.
  • We report on a Dirac-like Fermi surface in three-dimensional bulk materials in a distorted spinel structure on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) as well as tight-binding theory. The four examples we provide in this paper are BiZnSiO4, BiCaSiO4, BiMgSiO4, and BiAlInO4. A necessary characteristic of these structures is that they contain a Bi lattice which forms a hierarchy of chain-like substructures, with consequences for both fundamental understanding and materials design.
  • We demonstrate the existence of topological superconductors (SC) protected by mirror and time reversal (TR) symmetries. D-dimensional (D=1,2,3) crystalline SCs are characterized by 2^(D-1) independent integer topological invariants, which take the form of mirror Berry phases. These invariants determine the distribution of Majorana modes on a mirror symmetric boundary. The parity of total mirror Berry phase is the Z_2 index of a class DIII SC, implying that a DIII topological SC with a mirror line must also be a topological mirror SC but not vice versa, and that a DIII SC with a mirror plane is always TR trivial but can be mirror topological. We introduce representative models and suggest experimental signatures in feasible systems. Advances in quantum computing, the case for nodal SCs, the case for class D, and topological SCs protected by rotational symmetries are pointed out.
  • We propose a feasible route to engineer one and two dimensional time reversal invariant (TRI) topological superconductors (SC) via proximity effects between nodeless extended s wave iron-based SC and semiconductors with large Rashba spin-orbit interactions. At the boundary of a TRI topological SC, there emerges a Kramers pair of Majorana edge (bound) states. For a Josephson pi-junction we predict a Majorana quartet that is protected by mirror symmetry and leads to a mirror fractional Josephson effect. We analyze the evolution of Majorana pair in Zeeman fields, as the SC undergoes a symmetry class change as well as topological phase transitions, providing an experimental signature in tunneling spectroscopy. We briefly discuss the realization of this mechanism in candidate materials and the possibility of using s and d wave SC and weak topological insulators.
  • Selection rules and interference effects in angle resolved photoemission spectra from twisted graphene bilayers are studied within a long wavelength theory for the electronic structure. Using a generic model for the interlayer coupling, we identify features in the calculated ARPES momentum distributions that are controlled by the singularities and topological character of its long wavelength spectrum. We distinguish spectral features that are controlled by single-layer singularities in the spectrum, their modification by gauge potentials in each layer generated by the interlayer coupling, and new energy-dependent interference effects that directly probe the interlayer coherence. The results demonstrate how the energy- and polarization- dependence of ARPES spectra can be used to characterize the interlayer coupling in twisted bilayer graphenes.
  • Electronic states at domain walls in bilayer graphene are studied by analyzing their four and two band continuum models, by performing numerical calculations on the lattice, and by using quantum geometric arguments. The continuum theories explain the distinct electronic properties of boundary modes localized near domain walls formed by interlayer electric field reversal, by interlayer stacking reversal, and by simultaneous reversal of both quantities. Boundary mode properties are related to topological transitions and gap closures which occur in the bulk Hamiltonian parameter space. The important role played by intervalley coupling effects not directly captured by the continuum model is addressed using lattice calculations for specific domain wall structures.
  • We present ab initio and k.p calculations of the spin texture on the Fermi surface of tensile strained HgTe, which is obtained by stretching the zincblende lattice along the (111) axis. Tensile strained HgTe is a semimetal with pointlike accidental degeneracies between a mirror symmetry protected twofold degenerate band and two nondegenerate bands near the Fermi level. The Fermi surface consists of two ellipsoids which contact at the point where the Fermi level crosses the twofold degenerate band along the (111) axis. However, the spin texture of occupied states indicates that neither ellipsoid carries a compensating Chern number. Consequently, the spin texture is locked in the plane perpendicular to the (111) axis, exhibits a nonzero winding number in that plane, and changes winding number from one end of the Fermi ellipsoids to the other. The change in the winding of the spin texture suggests the existence of singular points. An ordered alloy of HgTe with ZnTe has the same effect as stretching the zincblende lattice in the (111) direction. We present ab initio calculations of ordered Hg_xZn_1-xTe that confirm the existence of a spin texture locked in a 2D plane on the Fermi surface with different winding numbers on either end.
  • Polymer nanofibers are one-dimensional organic hydrocarbon systems containing conducting polymers where the non-linear local excitations such as solitons, polarons and bipolarons formed by the electron-phonon interaction were predicted. Magnetoconductance (MC) can simultaneously probe both the spin and charge of these mobile species and identify the effects of electron-electron interactions on these nonlinear excitations. Here we report our observations of a qualitatively different MC in polyacetylene (PA) and in polyaniline (PANI) and polythiophene (PT) nanofibers. In PA the MC is essentially zero, but it is present in PANI and PT. The universal scaling behavior and the zero (finite) MC in PA (PANI and PT) nanofibers provide evidence of Coulomb interactions between spinless charged solitons (interacting polarons which carry both spin and charge).
  • We study the interaction between a ferromagnetically ordered medium and the surface states of a topological insulator with a general surface termination. This interaction is strongly crystal face dependent and can generate chiral states along edges between crystal facets even for a uniform magnetization. While magnetization parallel to quintuple layers shifts the momentum of Dirac point, perpendicular magnetization lifts the Kramers degeneracy at any Dirac points except on the side face where the spectrum remains gapless and the Hall conductivity switches sign. Chiral states can be found at any edge that reverses the projection of surface normal to the stacking direction of quintuple layers. Magnetization also weakly hybridizes non cleavage surfaces.
  • We develop an effective bulk model with a topological boundary condition to study the surface states of topological insulators. We find that the Dirac point energy, the band curvature and the spin texture of surface states are crystal face-dependent. For a given face on a sphere, the Dirac point energy is determined by the bulk physics that breaks p-h symmetry in the surface normal direction and is tunable by surface potentials that preserve T symmetry. Constant energy contours near the Dirac point are ellipses with spin textures that are helical on the S/N pole, collapsed to one dimension on any side face, and tilted out-of-plane otherwise. Our findings identify a route to engineering the Dirac point physics on the surfaces of real materials.
  • In a Dirac semimetal, the conduction and valence bands contact only at discrete (Dirac) points in the Brillouin zone (BZ) and disperse linearly in all directions around these critical points. Including spin, the low energy effective theory around each critical point is a four band Dirac Hamiltonian. In two dimensions (2D), this situation is realized in graphene without spin-orbit coupling. 3D Dirac points are predicted to exist at the phase transition between a topological and a normal insulator in the presence of inversion symmetry. Here we show that 3D Dirac points can also be protected by crystallographic symmetries in particular space-groups and enumerate the criteria necessary to identify these groups. This reveals the possibility of 3D analogs to graphene. We provide a systematic approach for identifying such materials and present ab initio calculations of metastable \beta-cristobalite BiO_2 which exhibits Dirac points at the three symmetry related X points of the BZ.
  • The electronic spectra of rotationally faulted graphene bilayers are calculated using a continuum formulation for small fault angles that identifies two distinct electronic states of the coupled system. The low energy spectra of one state features a Fermi velocity reduction which ultimately leads to pairwise annihilation and regeneration of its low energy Dirac nodes. The physics in the complementary state is controlled by pseudospin selection rules that prevent a Fermi velocity renormalization and produce second generation symmetry-protected Dirac singularities in the spectrum. These results are compared with previous theoretical analyses and with experimental data.
  • This article reviews progress in the theoretical modelling of the electronic structure of rotationally faulted multilayer graphenes. In these systems the crystallographic axes of neighboring layers are misaligned so that the layer stacking does not occur in the Bernal structure observed in three dimensional graphite and frequently found in exfoliated bilayer graphene. Notably, rotationally faulted graphenes are commonly found in other forms of multilayer graphene including epitaxial graphenes thermally grown on ${\rm SiC \, (000 \bar 1)}$, graphenes grown by chemical vapor deposition, folded mechanically exfoliated graphenes, and graphene flakes deposited on graphite. Rotational faults are experimentally associated with a strong reduction of the energy scale for coherent single particle interlayer motion. The microscopic basis for this reduction and its consequences have attracted significant theoretical attention from several groups that are highlighted in this review.
  • We study the Landau quantization of the electronic spectrum for graphene bilayers that are rotationally faulted to produce periodic superlattices. Commensurate twisted bilayers exist in two families distinguished by their sublattice exchange parity. We show that these two families exhibit distinct Landau quantized spectra distinguished both by the interlayer coupling of their zero modes and by an amplitude modulation of their spectra at energies above their low energy interlayer coherence scales. These modulations can provide a powerful experimental probe of the magnitude of a weak coherence splitting in a bilayer and its low energy mass structure.