• In Montero-Dorta et al. 2017, we show that luminous red galaxies (LRGs) from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) at $z\sim0.55$ can be divided into two groups based on their star formation histories. So-called fast-growing LRGs assemble $80\%$ of their stellar mass at $z\sim5$, whereas slow-growing LRGs reach the same evolutionary state at $z\sim1.5$. We further demonstrate that these two subpopulations present significantly different clustering properties on scales of $\sim1 - 30 \mathrm{Mpc}$. Here, we measure the mean halo mass of each subsample using the galaxy-galaxy lensing technique, in the $\sim190\deg^2$ overlap of the LRG catalogue and the CS82 and CFHTLenS shear catalogues. We show that fast- and slow-growing LRGs have similar lensing profiles, which implies that they live in haloes of similar mass: $\log\left(M_{\rm halo}^{\rm fast}/h^{-1}\mathrm{M}_{\odot}\right) = 12.85^{+0.16}_{-0.26}$ and $\log\left(M_{\rm halo}^{\rm slow}/h^{-1}\mathrm{M}_{\odot}\right) =12.92^{+0.16}_{-0.22}$. This result, combined with the clustering difference, suggests the existence of galaxy assembly bias, although the effect is too subtle to be definitively proven given the errors on our current weak-lensing measurement. We show that this can soon be achieved with upcoming surveys like DES.
  • We carry out a joint analysis of redshift-space distortions and galaxy-galaxy lensing, with the aim of measuring the growth rate of structure; this is a key quantity for understanding the nature of gravity on cosmological scales and late-time cosmic acceleration. We make use of the final VIPERS redshift survey dataset, which maps a portion of the Universe at a redshift of $z \simeq 0.8$, and the lensing data from the CFHTLenS survey over the same area of the sky. We build a consistent theoretical model that combines non-linear galaxy biasing and redshift-space distortion models, and confront it with observations. The two probes are combined in a Bayesian maximum likelihood analysis to determine the growth rate of structure at two redshifts $z=0.6$ and $z=0.86$. We obtain measurements of $f\sigma_8(0.6) = 0.48 \pm 0.12$ and $f\sigma_8(0.86) = 0.48 \pm 0.10$. The additional galaxy-galaxylensing constraint alleviates galaxy bias and $\sigma_8$ degeneracies, providing direct measurements of $[f(0.6),\sigma_8(0.6)] = [0.93 \pm 0.22, 0.52 \pm 0.06]$ and $f(0.86),\sigma_8(0.86)] = [0.99 \pm 0.19, 0.48 \pm 0.04]$. These measurements are statistically consistent with a Universe where the gravitational interactions can be described by General Relativity, although they are not yet accurate enough to rule out some commonly considered alternatives. Finally, as a complementary test we measure the gravitational slip parameter, $E_G$ , for the first time at $z>0.6$. We find values of $\smash{\overline{E}_G}(0.6) = 0.16 \pm 0.09$ and $\smash{\overline{E}_G}(0.86) = 0.09 \pm 0.07$, when $E_G$ is averaged over scales above $3 h^{-1} \rm{Mpc}$. We find that our $E_G$ measurements exhibit slightly lower values than expected for standard relativistic gravity in a {\Lambda}CDM background, although the results are consistent within $1-2\sigma$.
  • We present the results of combined deep Keck/NIRC2, HST/WFC3 near-infrared and Herschel far infrared observations of an extremely star forming dusty lensed galaxy identified from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS J133542.9+300401). The galaxy is gravitationally lensed by a massive WISE identified galaxy cluster at $z\sim1$. The lensed galaxy is spectroscopically confirmed at $z=2.685$ from detection of $\rm {CO (1 \rightarrow 0)}$ by GBT and from detection of $\rm {CO (3 \rightarrow 2)}$ obtained with CARMA. We use the combined spectroscopic and imaging observations to construct a detailed lens model of the background dusty star-forming galaxy (DSFG) which allows us to study the source plane properties of the target. The best-fit lens model provide magnification of $\mu_{\rm star}=2.10\pm0.11$ and $\mu_{\rm dust}=2.02\pm0.06$ for the stellar and dust components respectively. Multi-band data yields a magnification corrected star formation rate of $1900(\pm200)\,M_{\odot}{\rm yr^{-1}}$ and stellar mass of $6.8_{-2.7}^{+0.9}\times10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$ consistent with a main sequence of star formation at $z\sim2.6$. The CO observations yield a molecular gas mass of $8.3(\pm1.0)\times10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$, similar to the most massive star-forming galaxies, which together with the high star-formation efficiency are responsible for the intense observed star formation rates. The lensed DSFG has a very short gas depletion time scale of $\sim40$ Myr. The high stellar mass and small gas fractions observed indicate that the lensed DSFG likely has already formed most of its stellar mass and could be a progenitor of the most massive elliptical galaxies found in the local Universe.
  • We describe the algorithm used to select the Emission Line Galaxy (ELG) sample at $z \sim 0.85$ for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the $g-r$ vs. $r-z$ colour-colour space and a cut on the $g$-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [OII] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg$^{-2}$ on the North Galactic Cap (NGC) and of 240 deg$^{-2}$ on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the eBOSS requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50,000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict $\sigma_{D_V}/D_V = 0.023$, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at $z \sim 0.85$, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.
  • We present two wide-field catalogs of photometrically-selected emission line galaxies (ELGs) at z=0.8 covering about 2800 deg^2 over the south galactic cap. The catalogs were obtained using a Fisher discriminant technique described in a companion paper. The two catalogs differ by the imaging used to define the Fisher discriminant: the first catalog includes imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, the second also includes information from the South Galactic Cap U-band Sky Survey (SCUSS). Containing respectively 560,045 and 615,601 objects, they represent the largest ELG catalogs available today and were designed for the ELG programme of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). We study potential sources of systematic variation in the angular distribution of the selected ELGs due to fluctuations of the observational parameters. We model the influence of the observational parameters using a multivariate regression and implement a weighting scheme that allows effective removal of all of the systematic errors induced by the observational parameters. We show that fluctuations in the imaging zero-points of the photometric bands have minor impact on the angular distribution of objects in our catalogs. We compute the angular clustering of both catalogs and show that our weighting procedure effectively removes spurious clustering on large scales. We fit a model to the small scale angular clustering, showing that the selections have similar biases of 1.35/D_a(z) and 1.28/D_a(z). Both catalogs are publicly available.
  • We present the full public data release (PDR-2) of the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), performed at the ESO VLT. We release redshifts, spectra, CFHTLS magnitudes and ancillary information (as masks and weights) for a complete sample of 86,775 galaxies (plus 4,732 other objects, including stars and serendipitous galaxies); we also include their full photometrically-selected parent catalogue. The sample is magnitude limited to i_AB < 22.5, with an additional colour-colour pre-selection devised as to exclude galaxies at z<0.5. This practically doubles the effective sampling of the VIMOS spectrograph over the range 0.5<z<1.2 (reaching 47% on average), yielding a final median local galaxy density close to 5 10^{-3} h^3 Mpc}^{-3}. The total area spanned by the final data set is ~ 23.5 deg^2, corresponding to 288 VIMOS fields with marginal overlaps, split over two regions within the CFHTLS-Wide W1 and W4 equatorial fields (at R.A. ~2 and ~22 hours, respectively). Spectra were observed at a resolution R=220, covering a wavelength range 5500-9500 Angstrom. Data reduction and redshift measurements were performed through a fully automated pipeline; all redshift determinations were then visually validated and assigned a quality flag. Measurements with a quality flag >= 2 are shown to have a confidence level of 96% or larger and make up 88% of all measured galaxy redshifts (76,552 out of 86,775), constituting the VIPERS prime catalogue for statistical investigations. For this sample the rms redshift error, estimated using repeated measurements of about 3,000 galaxies, is found to be sigma_z = 0.00054(1+z). All data are available at http://vipers.inaf.it and on the ESO Archive.
  • We present a new strong lensing mass reconstruction of the Bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) at z=0.296, based on WFC3 and ACS HST imaging and VLT/FORS2 spectroscopy. The strong lensing constraints underwent substantial revision compared to previously published analysis, there are now 14 (six new and eight previously known) multiply-imaged systems, of which three have spectroscopically confirmed redshifts (including one newly measured from this work). The reconstructed mass distribution explicitly included the combination of three mass components: i) the intra-cluster gas mass derived from X-ray observation, ii) the cluster galaxies modeled by their fundamental plane scaling relations and iii) dark matter. The model that includes the intra-cluster gas is the one with the best Bayesian evidence. This model has a total RMS value of 0.158" between the predicted and measured image positions for the 14 multiple images considered. The proximity of the total RMS to resolution of HST/WFC3 and ACS (0.07-0.15" FWHM) demonstrates the excellent precision of our mass model. The derived mass model confirms the spatial offset between the X-ray gas and dark matter peaks. The fraction of the galaxy halos mass to total mass is found to be f_s=11+/-5% for a total mass of 2.5+/-0.1 x 10^14 solar mass within a 250 kpc radial aperture.
  • We present a new framework were we simultaneously fit strong lensing (SL) and dynamical data. The SL analysis is based on LENSTOOL, and the dynamical analysis uses MAMPOSSt code, which we have integrated into LENSTOOL. After describing the implementation of this new tool, we apply it on the galaxy group SL2S\,J02140-0535 ($z_{\rm spec}=0.44$), which we have already studied in the past. We use new VLT/FORS2 spectroscopy of multiple images and group members, as well as shallow X-ray data from \xmm. We confirm that the observed lensing features in SL2S\,J02140-0535 belong to different background sources. One of this sources is located at $z_{\rm spec}$ = 1.017 $\pm$ 0.001, whereas the other source is located at $z_{\rm spec}$ = 1.628 $\pm$ 0.001. With the analysis of our new and our previously reported spectroscopic data, we find 24 secure members for SL2S\,J02140-0535. Both data sets are well reproduced by a single NFW mass profile: the dark matter halo coincides with the peak of the light distribution, with scale radius, concentration, and mass equal to $r_s$ =$82^{+44}_{-17}$ kpc , $c_{200}$ = $10.0^{+1.7}_{-2.5}$, and $M_{200}$ = $1.0^{+0.5}_{-0.2}$ $\times$ 10$^{14}$M$_{\odot}$ respectively. These parameters are better constrained when we fit simultaneously SL and dynamical information. The mass contours of our best model agrees with the direction defined by the luminosity contours and the X-ray emission of SL2S\,J02140-0535. The simultaneous fit lowers the error in the mass estimate by 0.34 dex, when compared to the SL model, and in 0.15 dex when compared to the dynamical method.The combination of SL and dynamics tools yields a more accurate probe of the mass profile of SL2S\,J02140-0535 up to $r_{200}$. However, there is tension between the best elliptical SL model and the best spherical dynamical model.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) will observe 195,000 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) to measure the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation standard ruler (BAO) at redshift 0.9. To test different ELG selection algorithms, 9,000 spectra were observed with the SDSS spectrograph as a pilot survey based on data from several imaging surveys. First, using visual inspection and redshift quality flags, we show that the automated spectroscopic redshifts assigned by the pipeline meet the quality requirements for a reliable BAO measurement. We also show the correlations between sky emission, signal-to-noise ratio in the emission lines, and redshift error. Then we provide a detailed description of each target selection algorithm we tested and compare them with the requirements of the eBOSS experiment. As a result, we provide reliable redshift distributions for the different target selection schemes we tested. Finally, we determine an target selection algorithms that is best suited to be applied on DECam photometry because they fulfill the eBOSS survey efficiency requirements.
  • We present a joint optical/X-ray analysis of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308). Our strong- and weak-lensing analysis within the central region of the cluster, i.e., at R<1Mpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, reveals eight substructures, including the main core. All of these dark-matter halos are detected with a significance of at least 5sigma and feature masses ranging from 0.5 to 1.4x10^{14}Msun within R<150kpc. Merten et al. (2011) and Medezinski et al. (2016) substructures are also detected by us. We measure a slightly higher mass for the main core component than reported previously and attribute the discrepancy to the inclusion of our tightly constrained strong-lensing mass model built on Hubble Frontier Fields data. X-ray data obtained by XMM-Newton reveal four remnant cores, one of them a new detection, and three shocks. Unlike Merten et al. (2011), we find all cores to have both dark and luminous counterparts. A comparison with clusters of similar mass in the MXXL simulations yields no objects with as many massive substructures as observed in Abell 2744, confirming that Abell 2744 is an extreme system. We stress that these properties still do not constitute a challenge to $\Lambda$CDM, as caveats apply to both the simulation and the observations: for instance, the projected mass measurements from gravitational lensing and the limited resolution of the sub-haloes finders. We discuss implications of Abell 2744 for the plausibility of different dark-matter candidates and, finally, measure a new upper limit on the self-interaction cross-section of dark matter of sigma_{DM}<1.28cm2/g(68\% CL), in good agreement with previous results from Harvey et al. (2015).
  • Gravitational lensing by clusters of galaxies offers a powerful probe of their structure and mass distribution. Deriving a lens magnification map for a galaxy cluster is a classic inversion problem and many methods have been developed over the past two decades to solve it. Several research groups have developed techniques independently to map the predominantly dark matter distribution in cluster lenses. While these methods have all provided remarkably high precision mass maps, particularly with exquisite imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the reconstructions themselves have never been directly compared. In this paper, we report the results of comparing various independent lens modeling techniques employed by individual research groups in the community. Here we present for the first time a detailed and robust comparison of methodologies for fidelity, accuracy and precision. For this collaborative exercise, the lens modeling community was provided simulated cluster images -- of two clusters Ares and Hera -- that mimic the depth and resolution of the ongoing HST Frontier Fields. The results of the submitted reconstructions with the un-blinded true mass profile of these two clusters are presented here. Parametric, free-form and hybrid techniques have been deployed by the participating groups and we detail the strengths and trade-offs in accuracy and systematics that arise for each methodology. We note in conclusion that lensing reconstruction methods produce reliable mass distributions that enable the use of clusters as extremely valuable astrophysical laboratories and cosmological probes.
  • We present a fast and robust alternative method to compute covariance matrix in case of cosmology studies. Our method is based on the jackknife resampling applied on simulation mock catalogues. Using a set of 600 BOSS DR11 mock catalogues as a reference, we find that the jackknife technique gives a similar galaxy clustering covariance matrix estimate by requiring a smaller number of mocks. A comparison of convergence rates show that $\sim$7 times fewer simulations are needed to get a similar accuracy on variance. We expect this technique to be applied in any analysis where the number of available N-body simulations is low.
  • [abridged] We present a strong-lensing analysis of MACSJ0717.5+3745, based on the full depth of the Hubble Frontier Field (HFF) observations, which brings the number of multiply imaged systems to 61, ten of which are spectroscopically confirmed. The total number of images comprised in these systems rises to 165. Our analysis uses a parametric mass reconstruction technique, as implemented in the Lenstool software, to constrain a mass distribution composed of four large-scale mass components + galaxy-scale perturbers. We find a superposition of cored isothermal mass components to provide a good fit to the observational constraints, resulting in a very shallow mass distribution for the smooth (large-scale) component. Given the implications of such a flat mass profile, we investigate whether a model composed of "peaky" non-cored mass components can also reproduce the observational constraints. We find that such a non-cored mass model reproduces the observational constraints equally well. Although the total mass distributions of both models are consistent, as well as the integrated two dimensional mass profiles, we find that the smooth and the galaxy-scale components are very different. We conclude that, even in the HFF era, the generic degeneracy between smooth and galaxy-scale components is not broken, in particular in such a complex galaxy cluster. Consequently, insights into the mass distribution of MACS J0717 remain limited, underlining the need for additional probes beyond strong lensing. Our findings also have implications for estimates of the lensing magnification: we show that the amplification difference between the two models is larger than the error associated with either model. This uncertainty decreases the area of the image plane where we can reliably study the high-redshift Universe by 50 to 70%.
  • We present a high-precision mass model of the galaxy cluster MACSJ1149.6+2223, based on a strong-gravitational-lensing analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data and spectroscopic follow-up with Gemini/GMOS and VLT/MUSE. Our model includes 12 new multiply imaged galaxies, bringing the total to 22, comprised of 65 individual lensed images. Unlike the first two HFF clusters, Abell 2744 and MACSJ0416.1-2403, MACSJ1149 does not reveal as many multiple images in the HFF data. Using the Lenstool software package and the new sets of multiple images, we model the cluster with several cluster-scale dark-matter halos and additional galaxy-scale halos for the cluster members. Consistent with previous analyses, we find the system to be complex, composed of five cluster-scale halos. Their spatial distribution and lower mass, however, makes MACSJ1149 a less powerful lens. Our best-fit model predicts image positions with an RMS of 0.91". We measure the total projected mass inside a 200~kpc aperture as ($1.840\pm 0.006$)$\times 10^{14}$M$_{\odot}$, thus reaching again 1% precision, following our previous HFF analyses of MACSJ0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744. In light of the discovery of the first resolved quadruply lensed supernova, SN Refsdal, in one of the multiply imaged galaxies identified in MACSJ1149, we use our revised mass model to investigate the time delays and predict the rise of the next image between November 2015 and January 2016.
  • Our work is based on the stacked weak-lensing analysis of a sample of 80 strong-lensing galaxy groups. Our main results are the following: (i) the lensing signal does not allow us to firmly reject a simple singular isothermal sphere mass distribution compared to the expected NFW mass profile; (ii) we obtain an average concentration $c_{200}=8.6_{-1.3}^{+2.1}$ that is much higher than the expected value from numerical simulations for the corresponding average mass $M_{200}=0.73_{-0.10}^{+0.11}\times10^{14}\mathrm{M_{\odot}}$; (iii) the combination of our results with those at larger mass scales gives a mass-concentration relation $c(M)$ over nearly two decades in mass, with a slope in disagreement with predictions from numerical simulations using unbiased populations of dark matter haloes; (iv) our combined $c(M)$ relation matches results from simulations using only haloes with a large strong-lensing cross section, i.e. elongated with a major axis close to the line of sight; (v) for the simplest case of prolate haloes, we estimate with a toy model a lower limit on the minor:major axis ratio $a/c=0.5$ for the average SARCS galaxy group. Our analysis based on galaxy groups confirmed the results obtained at larger mass scales: strong lenses present apparently too large concentrations, which can be explained by triaxial haloes preferentially oriented with the line of sight. Because more massive systems already have large lensing cross sections, they do not require a large elongation along the line of sight, contrary to less massive galaxy groups. Therefore, it is natural to observe larger lensing (projected) concentrations for such systems, resulting in an overall mass-concentration relation steeper than that of non-lensing haloes.
  • Constraints on the mass distribution in high-redshift clusters of galaxies are not currently very strong. We aim to constrain the mass profile, M(r), and dynamical status of the $z \sim 0.8$ LCDCS 0504 cluster of galaxies characterized by prominent giant gravitational arcs near its center. Our analysis is based on deep X-ray, optical, and infrared imaging, as well as optical spectroscopy. We model the mass distribution of the cluster with three different mass density profiles, whose parameters are constrained by the strong lensing features of the inner cluster region, by the X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium, and by the kinematics of 71 cluster members. We obtain consistent M(r) determinations from three methods (dispersion-kurtosis, caustics and MAMPOSSt), out to the cluster virial radius and beyond. The mass profile inferred by the strong lensing analysis in the central cluster region is slightly above, but still consistent with, the kinematics estimate. On the other hand, the X-ray based M(r) is significantly below both the kinematics and strong lensing estimates. Theoretical predictions from $\Lambda$CDM cosmology for the concentration--mass relation are in agreement with our observational results, when taking into account the uncertainties in both the observational and theoretical estimates. There appears to be a central deficit in the intra-cluster gas mass fraction compared to nearby clusters. Despite the relaxed appearance of this cluster, the determinations of its mass profile by different probes show substantial discrepancies, the origin of which remains to be determined. The extension of a similar dynamical analysis to other clusters of the DAFT/FADA survey will allow to shed light on the possible systematics that affect the determination of mass profiles of high-z clusters, possibly related to our incomplete understanding of intracluster baryon physics.
  • We analyse the structures of all the clusters in the DAFT/FADA survey for which XMM-Newton and/or a sufficient number of galaxy redshifts in the cluster range is available, with the aim of detecting substructures and evidence for merging events. These properties are discussed in the framework of standard cold dark matter cosmology.XMM-Newton data were available for 32 clusters, for which we derive the X-ray luminosity and a global X-ray temperature for 25 of them. For 23 clusters we were able to fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to detect substructures in the X-ray gas. A dynamical analysis based on the SG method was applied to the clusters having at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range: 18 X-ray clusters and 11 clusters with no X-ray data. Only major substructures will be detected. Ten substructures were detected both in X-rays and by the SG method. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are probably at their first cluster pericentre approach and are relatively recent infalls. We also find hints of a decreasing X-ray gas density profile core radius with redshift. The percentage of mass included in substructures was found to be roughly constant with redshift with values of 5-15%, in agreement both with the general CDM framework and with the results of numerical simulations. Galaxies in substructures show the same general behaviour as regular cluster galaxies; however, in substructures, there is a deficiency of both late type and old stellar population galaxies. Late type galaxies with recent bursts of star formation seem to be missing in the substructures close to the bottom of the host cluster potential well. However, our sample would need to be increased to allow a more robust analysis.
  • We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after subtracting sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I(250 microns) > 0.69_(-0.03)^(+0.03) (stat.)_(-0.06)^(+0.11) (sys.) MJy/sr, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB.
  • We present results of a strong-lensing analysis of MACS J0717.5+3745 (hereafter MACS J0717), an extremely X-ray luminous galaxy cluster at z=0.55. Observations at different wavelengths reveal a complex and dynamically very active cluster, whose core is connected to a large scale filament extended over several Mpc. Using multi-passband imaging data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), we identify 15 multiply imaged systems across the full field of view of ACS, five of which we confirmed spectroscopically in groundbased follow-up observations with the Keck telescope. We use these multiply imaged systems to constrain a parametric model of the mass distribution in the cluster core, employing a new parallelized version of the Lenstool software. The main result is that the most probable description of the mass distribution comprises four cluster-scale dark matter haloes. The total mass distribution follows the light distribution but strongly deviates from the distribution of the intra-cluster gas as traced by the X-ray surface brightness. This confirms the complex morphology proposed by previous studies. We interpret this segregation of collisional and collisionless matter as strong evidence of multiple mergers and ongoing dynamical activity. MACS J0717 thus constitutes one of the most disturbed clusters presently known and, featuring a projected mass within the ACS field of view (R=150"=960 kpc) of 2.11 +- 0.23 x 10^{15} M_{sun}, the system is also one of the most massive known.
  • We present high-resolution maps of stars, dust, and molecular gas in a strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z = 3.259. HATLAS12--00 is selected from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) as a strong lens candidate mainly based on its unusually high 500um flux density (~300 mJy). It is the only high-redshift Planck detection in the 130 deg^2 H-ATLAS Phase 1 area. Keck Adaptive Optics images reveal a quadruply imaged galaxy in the K-band while the Submillimeter Array and the Extended Very Large Array show doubly imaged 880um and CO(1-0) sources, indicating differentiated distributions of the various components in the galaxy. In the source plane, the stars reside in three major kpc-scale clumps extended over ~1.6 kpc, the dust in a compact (~1 kpc) region ~3 kpc north of the stars, and the cold molecular gas in an extended (~7 kpc) disk ~5 kpc northeast of the stars. The emission from the stars, dust, and gas are magnified by ~17, 8, and 7 times, respectively, by four lensing galaxies at z ~ 1. Intrinsically, the lensed galaxy is a warm (T_dust ~ 40-65 K), hyper-luminous (L_IR ~ 1.7e13 Lsun; SFR ~ 2000 Msun/yr), gas-rich (M_gas/M_baryon ~ 70%), young (M_stellar/SFR ~ 20 Myr), and short-lived (M_gas/SFR ~ 40 Myr) starburst, without a significant active galactic nucleus. With physical properties similar to unlensed z > 2 SMGs, HATLAS12--00 offers a detailed view of a typical SMG through a powerful cosmic microscope.
  • Among the 100 strong lens candidates found in the COSMOS field, 20 with redshifts in the range [0.34,1.13], feature multiple images of background sources. Using the multi-wavelength coverage of the field and its spectroscopic follow-up, we characterize the evolution with redshift of the environment and of the dark-matter (DM) fraction of the lens galaxies. We present new redshift of the strong lens candidates. The lens environment is characterized by the projected 10 closest galaxies around each lens and by the number of galaxies with a projected distance less than 1Mpc at the lens galaxy redshift. In both cases, we perform similar measurements on a control sample of twin non-lens early type galaxies (ETGs). In addition, we identify group members and field galaxies in the X-ray and optical catalogs of galaxy groups. From those catalogs, we measure the external shear contribution at the lens galaxy positions. The systems are then modeled using a SIE plus the external shear due to the groups. We observe that the average stellar mass of lens galaxies increases with z and that the environment of lens galaxies is compatible with that of the twins. During the lens modeling, we notice that, when let free, the external shear points in a direction which is the mean direction of the external shear due to groups and of the closest galaxy to the lens. We notice that the DM fraction of the lens galaxies within the Einstein radius decreases as the redshift increases. Given these, we conclude that, while the environment of lens galaxies is compatible with that of non-lens ETGS, their mass properties evolves significantly with redshift: it is still not clear whether this advocates in favor of a stronger lensing bias toward massive objects at high redshift or is simply representative of the high proportion of massive and high stellar density galaxies at high redshift.
  • We present three bright z+ dropout candidates selected from deep Near-Infrared (NIR) imaging of the COSMOS 2 square degree field. All three objects match the 0.8-8um colors of other published z>7 candidates but are three magnitudes brighter, facilitating further study. Deep spectroscopy of two of the candidates covering 0.64-1.02um with Keck-DEIMOS and all three covering 0.94-1.10um and 1.52-1.80um with Keck-NIRSPEC detects weak spectral features tentatively identified as Ly-alpha at z=6.95 and z=7.69 in two of the objects. The third object is placed at z~1.6 based on a 24um and weak optical detection. A comparison with the spectral energy distributions of known z<7 galaxies, including objects with strong spectral lines, large extinction, and large systematic uncertainties in the photometry yields no objects with similar colors. However, the lambda>1um properties of all three objects can be matched to optically detected sources with photometric redshifts at z~1.8, so the non-detection in the i+ and z+ bands are the primary factors which favors a z>7 solution. If any of these objects are at z~7 the bright end of the luminosity function is significantly higher at z>7 than suggested by previous studies, but consistent within the statistical uncertainty and the dark matter halo distribution. If these objects are at low redshift, the Lyman-Break selection must be contaminated by a previously unknown population of low redshift objects with very strong breaks in their broad band spectral energy distributions and blue NIR colors. The implications of this result on luminosity function evolution at high redshift is discussed. We show that the primary limitation of z>7 galaxy searches with broad filters is the depth of the available optical data.
  • The existence of strong lensing systems with Einstein radii (Re) covering the full mass spectrum, from ~1-2" (produced by galaxy scale dark matter haloes) to >10" (produced by galaxy cluster scale haloes) have long been predicted. Many lenses with Re around 1-2" and above 10" have been reported but very few in between. In this article, we present a sample of 13 strong lensing systems with Re in the range 3"- 8", i.e. systems produced by galaxy group scale dark matter haloes, spanning a redshift range from 0.3 to 0.8. This opens a new window of exploration in the mass spectrum, around 10^{13}- 10^{14} M_{sun}, which is a crucial range for understanding the transition between galaxies and galaxy clusters. Our analysis is based on multi-colour CFHTLS images complemented with HST imaging and ground based spectroscopy. Large scale properties are derived from both the light distribution of the elliptical galaxies group members and weak lensing of the faint background galaxy population. On small scales, the strong lensing analysis yields Einstein radii between 2.5" and 8". On larger scales, the strong lenses coincide with the peak of the light distribution, suggesting that mass is traced by light. Most of the luminosity maps have complicated shapes, indicating that these intermediate mass structures are dynamically young. Fitting the reduced shear with a Singular Isothermal Sphere, we find sigma ~ 500 km/s and an upper limit of ~900 km/s for the whole sample. The mass to light ratio for the sample is found to be M/L_i ~ 250 (solar units, corrected for evolution), with an upper limit of 500. This can be compared to mass to light ratios of small groups (with sigma ~ 300 km/s and galaxy clusters with sigma > 1000 km/s, thus bridging the gap between these mass scales.
  • SL2SJ02176-0513 is a remarkable lens for the presence of two multiply-imaged systems at different redshifts lensed by a foreground massive galaxy at $z_{\rm lens}=0.656$: a bright cusp arc at $z_{\rm arc}=1.847$ and an additional double-image system at an estimated redshift of $z_{\rm dbl}\sim2.9$ based on photometry and lensing geometry. The system is located about 400 kpc away from the center of a massive group of galaxies. Mass estimates for the group are available from X-ray observations and satellite kinematics. Multicolor photometry provides an estimate of the stellar mass of the main lens galaxy. The lensing galaxy is modeled with two components (stars and dark matter), and we include the perturbing effect of the group environment, and all available constraints. We find that classic lensing degeneracies, e.g. between external convergence and mass density slope, are significantly reduced with respect to standard systems and infer tight constraints on the mass density profile: (i) the dark matter content of the main lens galaxy is in line with that of typical galaxies $f_{\rm dm}(<R_{\rm e})=0.41^{+0.09}_{-0.06}$; (ii) the required mass associated with the dark matter halo of the nearby group is consistent with X-ray and weak-lensing estimates ($\sigma_{\rm grp}=550^{+130}_{-240}$); (iii) accounting for the group contribution in the form of an external convergence, the slope of the mass density profile of the main lens galaxy alone is found to be $\alpha=-1.03^{+0.22}_{-0.16}$, consistent with the isothermal ($\alpha=-1$) slope. We demonstrate that multiple source plane systems together with good ancillary dataset can be used to disentangle local and environmental effects.
  • We discuss the X-ray and optical properties of the massive galaxy cluster MACSJ1206.2-0847 (z=0.4385), discovered in the Massive Cluster Survey (MACS). Our Chandra observation of the system yields a total X-ray luminosity of 2.4 x 10^45 erg/s (0.1-2.4 keV) and a global gas temperature of (11.6 +/- 0.7) keV, very high values typical of MACS clusters. In both optical and X-ray images MACSJ1206 appears close to relaxed in projection, with a pronounced X-ray peak at the location of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG); we interpret this feature as the remnant of a cold core. A spectacular giant gravitational arc, 15" in length, bright (V~21) and unusually red (R-K=4.3), is seen 20" west of the BCG; we measure a redshift of z=1.036 for the lensed galaxy. From our HST image of the cluster we identify the giant arc and its counter image as a seven-fold imaged system. An excess of X-ray emission in the direction of the arc coincides with a mild galaxy overdensity and could be the remnant of a minor merger with a group of galaxies. We derive estimates of the total cluster mass as well as of the mass of the cluster core using X-ray, dynamical, and gravitational-lensing techniques. For the mass enclosed by the giant arc (r<119 kpc) our strong-lensing analysis based on HST imaging yields a very high value of 1.1 x 10^14 M_sun, inconsistent with the much lower X-ray estimate of 0.5 x 10^14 M_sun. Similarly, the virial estimate of 4 x 10^15 M_sun for the total cluster mass, derived from multi-object spectroscopy of 38 cluster members, is significantly higher than the corresponding X-ray estimate of 1.7 x 10^15 M_sun. We take the discrepant mass estimates to be indicative of substructure along the line of sight during an ongoing merger event, an interpretation that is supported by the system's very high velocity dispersion of 1580 km/s.