• $\kappa$ Andromedae, an early type star that hosts a directly imaged low mass companion, is expected to be oblate due to its rapid rotational velocity ($v\sin i$ = $\sim$162 $\mathrm{km~s^{-1}}$). We observed the star with the CHARA Array's optical beam combiner, PAVO, measuring its size at multiple orientations and determining its oblateness. The interferometric measurements, combined with photometry and this $v\sin i$ value are used to constrain an oblate star model that yields the fundamental properties of the star and finds a rotation speed that is $\sim$85\% of the critical rate and a low inclination of $\sim$30$^\circ$. Three modeled properties (the average radius, bolometric luminosity, and equatorial velocity) are compared to MESA evolution models to determine an age and mass for the star. In doing so, we determine an age for the system of 47$^{+27}_{-40}$ Myr. Based on this age and previous measurements of the companion's temperature, the BHAC15 evolution models imply a mass for the companion of 22$^{+8}_{-9}$ M$_\mathrm{J}$.
  • A classical nova occurs when material accreting onto the surface of a white dwarf in a close binary system ignites in a thermonuclear runaway. Complex structures observed in the ejecta at late stages could result from interactions with the companion during the common envelope phase. Alternatively, the explosion could be intrinsically bipolar, resulting from a localized ignition on the surface of the white dwarf or as a consequence of rotational distortion. Studying the structure of novae during the earliest phases is challenging because of the high spatial resolution needed to measure their small sizes. Here we report near-infrared interferometric measurements of the angular size of Nova Delphini 2013, starting from one day after the explosion and continuing with extensive time coverage during the first 43 days. Changes in the apparent expansion rate can be explained by an explosion model consisting of an optically thick core surrounded by a diffuse envelope. The optical depth of the ejected material changes as it expands. We detect an ellipticity in the light distribution, suggesting a prolate or bipolar structure that develops as early as the second day. Combining the angular expansion rate with radial velocity measurements, we derive a geometric distance to the nova of 4.54 +/- 0.59 kpc from the Sun.
  • We present new results from a radial velocity study of six bright OB stars with little or no prior measurements. One of these, HD 45314, may be a long-period binary, but the velocity variations of this Be star may be related to changes in its circumstellar disk. Significant velocity variations were also found for HD 60848 (possibly related to nonradial pulsations) and HD 61827 (related to wind variations). The other three targets, HD 46150, HD 54879, and HD 206183, are constant velocity objects, but we note that HD 54879 has H$\alpha$ emission that may originate from a binary companion. We illustrate the average red spectrum of each target.
  • We have measured the angular diameter of the transiting extrasolar planet host star HD 189733 using the CHARA O/IR interferometric array. Combining our new angular diameter of 0.377+/-0.024 mas with the Hipparcos parallax leads to a linear radius for the host star of 0.779+/-0.052 Rsol and a radius for the planet of 1.19+/-0.08 RJup. Adopting the mass of the planet as derived by its discoverers, we derive a mean density of the planet of 0.91+/-0.18 g cm-3. This is the first determination of the diameter of an extrasolar planet through purely direct means.
  • We present the first K'-band, long-baseline interferometric observations of the northern Be stars gamma Cas, phi Per, zeta Tau, and kappa Dra. The measurements were made with multiple telescope pairs of the CHARA Array interferometer, and in every case the observations indicate that the circumstellar disks of the targets are resolved. We fit the interferometric visibilities with predictions from a simple disk model that assumes an isothermal gas in Keplerian rotation. We derive fits of the four model parameters (disk base density, radial density exponent, disk normal inclination, and position angle) for each of the targets. The resulting densities are in broad agreement with prior studies of the IR excess flux and the resulting orientations generally agree with those from interferometric H-alpha and continuum polarimetric observations. We find that the angular size of the K' disk emission is smaller than that determined for the H-alpha emission, and we argue that the difference is the result of a larger H-alpha opacity and the relatively larger neutral hydrogen fraction with increasing disk radius. All the targets are known binaries with faint companions, and we find that companions appear to influence the interferometric visibilities in the cases of phi Per and kappa Dra. We also present contemporaneous observations of the H-alpha, H-gamma, and Br-gamma emission lines. Synthetic model profiles of these lines that are based on the same disk inclination and radial density exponent as derived from the CHARA Array observations match the observed emission line strength if the disk base density is reduced by approximately 1.7 dex.