• The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • Several studies support the existence of a link between the AGN and star formation activity. Radio jets have been argued to be an ideal mechanism for direct interaction between the AGN and the host galaxy. A drawback of previous surveys of AGN is that they are fundamentally limited by the degeneracy between redshift and luminosity in flux-density limited samples. To overcome this limitation, we present far-infrared Herschel observations of 74 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), 72 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 27 radio galaxies (RGs), selected at 0.9<z<1.1 which span over two decades in optical luminosity. By decoupling luminosity from evolutionary effects, we investigate how the star formation rate (SFR) depends on AGN luminosity, radio-loudness and orientation. We find that: 1) the SFR shows a weak correlation with the bolometric luminosity for all AGN sub-samples, 2) the RLQs show a SFR excess of about a factor of 1.4 compared to the RQQs, matched in terms of black hole mass and bolometric luminosity, suggesting that either positive radio-jet feedback or radio AGN triggering are linked to star-formation triggering and 3) RGs have lower SFRs by a factor of 2.5 than the RLQ sub-sample with the same BH mass and bolometric luminosity. We suggest that there is some jet power threshold at which radio-jet feedback switches from enhancing star formation (by compressing gas) to suppressing it (by ejecting gas). This threshold depends on both galaxy mass and jet power.
  • We present results from an analysis of the largest high-redshift (z > 3) X-ray-selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) sample to date, combining the Chandra C-COSMOS and ChaMP surveys and doubling the previous samples. The sample comprises 209 X-ray-detected AGN, over a wide range of rest frame 2-10 keV luminosities logL_{X}=43.3 - 46.0 erg s^{-1}. X-ray hardness rates show that ~39% of the sources are highly obscured, N_{H}>10^{22} cm^{-2}, in agreement with the ~37% of type-2 AGN found in our sample based on their optical classification. For ~26% of objects have mismatched optical and X-ray classifications. Using the 1/V_{max} method, we confirm that the comoving space density of all luminosity ranges of AGNs decreases with redshift above z > 3 and up to z ~ 7. With a significant sample of AGN (N=27) at z > 4, it is found that both source number counts in the 0.5 -2 keV band and comoving space density are consistent with the expectation of a luminosity dependent density evolution (LDDE) model at all redshifts, while they exclude the luminosity and density evolution (LADE) model. The measured comoving space density of type-1 and type-2 AGN shows a constant ratio between the two types at z > 3. Our results for both AGN types at these redshifts are consistent with the expectations of LDDE model.
  • We have constructed a sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars from the Faint Im- ages Radio Sky at Twenty-one centimetres (FIRST) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), over the H-ATLAS Phase 1 Area (9h, 12h and 14.5h). Using a stacking analysis we find a significant correlation between the far-infrared luminosity and 1.4-GHz luminosity for radio-loud quasars. Partial correlation analysis confirms the intrinsic correlation after removing the redshift contribution while for radio-quiet quasars no partial correlation is found. Using a single-temperature grey-body model we find a general trend of lower dust temperatures in the case of radio-loud quasars comparing to radio-quiet quasars. Also, radio-loud quasars are found to have almost constant mean values of dust mass along redshift and optical luminosity bins. In addition, we find that radio-loud quasars at lower optical luminosities tend to have on average higher FIR and 250-micron luminosity with respect to radio-quiet quasars with the same optical luminosites. Even if we use a two-temperature grey-body model to describe the FIR data, the FIR luminosity excess remains at lower optical luminosities. These results suggest that powerful radio jets are associated with star formation especially at lower accretion rates.
  • We investigate the [O II] emission line properties of 18,508 quasars at z<1.6 drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar sample. The quasar sample has been separated into 1,692 radio-loud and 16,816 radio-quiet quasars (RLQs and RQQs hereafter) matched in both redshift and i'-band absolute magnitude. We use the [O II]\lambda3726+3729 line as an indicator of star formation. Based on these measurements we find evidence that star-formation activity is higher in the RLQ population. The mean equivalent widths (EW) for [O II] are EW([O II])_RL=7.80\pm0.30 \AA, and EW([O II])_RQ=4.77\pm0.06 \AA, for the RLQ and RQQ samples respectively. The mean [O II] luminosities are \log[L([O II])_RL/W]=34.31\pm0.01 and \log[L([O II])_RQ/W]=34.192\pm0.004 for the samples of RLQs and RQQs respectively. Finally, to overcome possible biases in the EW measurements due to the continuum emission below the [O II] line being contaminated by young stars in the host galaxy, we use the ratio of the [O II] luminosity to rest-frame i'-band luminosity, in this case, we find for the RLQs \log[L([O II])_RL/L_opt]=-3.89\pm0.01 and \log[L([O II])_RQ/L_opt]=-4.011\pm0.004 for RQQs. However the results depend upon the optical luminosity of the quasar. RLQs and RQQs with the same high optical luminosity \log(L_opt/W)>38.6, tend to have the same level of [O II] emission. On the other hand, at lower optical luminosities \log(L_opt/W)<38.6, there is a clear [O II] emission excess for the RLQs. As an additional check of our results we use the [O III] emission line as a tracer of the bolometric accretion luminosity, instead of the i'-band absolute magnitude, and we obtain similar results. Radio jets appear to be the main reason for the [O II] emission excess in the case of RLQs. In contrast, we suggest AGN feedback ensures that the two populations acquire the same [O II] emission at higher optical luminosities.
  • We present the optical spectra of a sample of 34 SWIRE-CDFS sources observed with EFOSC2 on the ESO 3.6m Telescope. We have used the spectra and spectroscopic redshifts to validate our photometric redshift codes and SED template fitting methods. 12 of our sources are Infrared Luminous Galaxies. Of these, five belong to the class of ULIRGs and one to the class of HLIRGs with evidence of both an AGN and starburst component contributing to their extreme infrared luminosity for 3, starburst contributing for 1 and AGN contributing for 2 of them.