• We performed a wide-area (2000 deg$^{2}$) g and I band experiment as part of a two month extension to the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory. We discovered 36 extragalactic transients including iPTF17lf, a highly reddened local SN Ia, iPTF17bkj, a new member of the rare class of transitional Ibn/IIn supernovae, and iPTF17be, a candidate luminous blue variable outburst. We do not detect any luminous red novae and place an upper limit on their rate. We show that adding a slow-cadence I band component to upcoming surveys such as the Zwicky Transient Facility will improve the photometric selection of cool and dusty transients.
  • Wide-field surveys are discovering a growing number of rare transients whose physical origin is not yet well understood. Here, we present optical and UV data and analysis of iPTF16asu, a luminous, rapidly-evolving, high velocity, stripped-envelope supernova. With a rest-frame rise-time of just 4 days and a peak absolute magnitude of $M_{\rm g}=-20.4$ mag, the light curve of iPTF16asu is faster and more luminous than previous rapid transients. The spectra of iPTF16asu show a featureless, blue continuum near peak that develops into a Type Ic-BL spectrum on the decline. We show that while the late-time light curve could plausibly be powered by $^{56}$Ni decay, the early emission requires a different energy source. Non-detections in the X-ray and radio strongly constrain any associated gamma-ray burst to be low-luminosity. We suggest that the early emission may have been powered by either a rapidly spinning-down magnetar, or by shock breakout in an extended envelope of a very energetic explosion. In either scenario a central engine is required, making iPTF16asu an intriguing transition object between superluminous supernovae, Type Ic-BL supernovae, and low-energy gamma-ray bursts.
  • We study PTF11mnb, a He-poor supernova (SN) whose pre-peak light curves (LCs) resemble those of SN 2005bf, a peculiar double-peaked stripped-envelope (SE) SN. LCs, colors and spectral properties are compared to those of SN 2005bf and normal SE SNe. A bolometric LC is built and modeled with the SNEC hydrodynamical code explosion of a MESA progenitor star, as well as with semi-analytic models. The LC of PTF11mnb turns out to be similar to that of SN 2005bf until $\sim$50 d, when the main (secondary) peaks occur at $-18.5$ mag. The early peak occurs at $\sim$20 d, and is about 1.0 mag fainter. After the main peak, the decline rate of PTF11mnb is remarkably slower than that of SN 2005bf, and it traces the $^{56}$Co decay rate. The spectra of PTF11mnb reveal no traces of He unlike in the case of SN Ib 2005bf. The bolometric LC is well reproduced by the explosion of a massive ($M_{ej} =$ 7.8 $M_{\odot}$), He-poor star with a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, a total $^{56}$Ni mass of 0.59 $M_{\odot}$ and an explosion energy of 2.2$\times$10$^{51}$ erg. Alternatively, a normal SN Ib/c explosion [M($^{56}$Ni)$=$0.11 $M_{\odot}$, $E_{K}$ = 0.2$\times$10$^{51}$ erg, $M_{ej} =$ 1 $M_{\odot}$] can power the first peak while a magnetar ($B$=5.0$\times$10$^{14}$ G, $P=18.1$ ms) provides energy for the main peak. The early $g$-band LC implies a radius of at least 30 $R_{\odot}$. If PTF11mnb arose from a massive He-poor star characterized by a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, the ejecta mass and the absence of He imply a large ZAMS mass ($\sim85 M_{\odot}$) for the progenitor, which most likely was a Wolf-Rayet star, surrounded by an extended envelope formed either by a pre-SN eruption or due to a binary configuration. Alternatively, PTF11mnb could be powered by a normal SE SN during the first peak and by a magnetar afterwards.
  • Type Ibn supernovae (SNe Ibn) are thought to be the core-collapse explosions of massive stars whose ejecta interact with He-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report the discovery of a SN Ibn, with the longest rise-time ever observed, OGLE-2014-SN-131. We discuss the potential powering mechanisms and the progenitor nature of this peculiar stripped-envelope (SE), circumstellar-interacting SN. Optical photometry and spectroscopy were obtained with multiple telescopes including VLT, NTT, and GROND. We compare light curves and spectra with those of other known SNe Ibn and Ibc. CSM velocities are derived from the spectral analysis. The SN light curve is modeled under different assumptions about its powering mechanism (${^{56}}$Ni decay, CSM-interaction, magnetar) in order to estimate the SN progenitor parameters. OGLE-2014-SN-131 spectroscopically resembles SNe Ibn such as SN 2010al. Its peak luminosity and post-peak colors are also similar to those of other SNe Ibn. However, it shows an unprecedentedly long rise-time and a much broader light curve compared to other SNe Ibn. Its bolometric light curve can be reproduced by magnetar and CSM-interaction models, but not by a ${^{56}}$Ni-decay powering model. To explain the unusually long rise-time, the broad light curve, the light curve decline, and the spectra characterized by narrow emission lines, we favor a powering mechanism where the SN ejecta are interacting with a dense CSM. The progenitor of OGLE-2014-SN-131 was likely a Wolf-Rayet star with a mass greater than that of a typical SN Ibn progenitor, which expelled the CSM that the SN is interacting with.
  • Context: Research on supernovae (SNe) over the past decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are much more luminous (by $\sim2$ mag) than canonical core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). These events with visual peak magnitudes $\lesssim-21$ are called superluminous SNe (SLSNe). Aims: There are a few intermediate events which have luminosities between these two classes. Here we study one such object, SN 2012aa. Methods: The optical photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the event were conducted over a time span of about 120 days. Results: With V_abs at peak ~-20 mag, the SN is an intermediate-luminosity transient between regular SNe Ibc and SLSNe. It also exhibits an unusual secondary bump after the maximum in its light curve. We interpret this as a manifestation of SN-shock interaction with the CSM. If we would assume a $^{56}$Ni-powered ejecta, the bolometric light curve requires roughly 1.3 M_sun of $^{56}$Ni and an ejected mass of ~14 M_sun. This would also imply a high kinetic energy of the explosion, ~5.4$\times10^{51}$ ergs. On the other hand, the unusually broad light curve along with the secondary peak indicate the possibility of interaction with CSM. The third alternative is the presence of a central engine releasing spin energy that eventually powers the light curve over a long time. The host of the SN is a star-forming Sa/Sb/Sbc galaxy. Conclusions: Although the spectral properties and velocity evolution of SN 2012aa are comparable to those of normal SNe Ibc, its broad light curve along with a large peak luminosity distinguish it from canonical CCSNe, suggesting the event to be an intermediate-luminosity transient between CCSNe and SLSNe at least in terms of peak luminosity. We argue that SN 2012aa belongs to a subclass where CSM interaction plays a significant role in powering the SN, at least during the initial stages of evolution.
  • We investigate two stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 5806 by the (i)PTF. These SNe, designated PTF12os/SN 2012P and iPTF13bvn, exploded at a similar distance from the host-galaxy center. We classify PTF12os as a Type IIb SN based on our spectral sequence; iPTF13bvn has previously been classified as Type Ib having a likely progenitor with zero age main sequence (ZAMS) mass below ~17 solar masses. Our main objective is to constrain the explosion parameters of iPTF12os and iPTF13bvn, and to put constraints on the SN progenitors. We present comprehensive datasets on the SNe, and introduce a new reference-subtraction pipeline (FPipe) currently in use by the iPTF. We perform a detailed study of the light curves (LCs) and spectral evolution of the SNe. The bolometric LCs are modeled using the hydrodynamical code HYDE. We use nebular models and late-time spectra to constrain the ZAMS mass of the progenitors. We perform image registration of ground-based images of PTF12os to archival HST images of NGC 5806 to identify a potential progenitor candidate. Our nebular spectra of iPTF13bvn indicate a low ZAMS mass of ~12 solar masses for the progenitor. The late-time spectra of PTF12os are consistent with a ZAMS mass of ~15 solar masses. We successfully identify a progenitor candidate to PTF12os using archival HST images. This source is consistent with being a cluster of massive stars. Our hydrodynamical modeling suggests that the progenitor of PTF12os had a compact He core with a mass of 3.25 solar masses, and that 0.063 solar masses of strongly mixed 56Ni was synthesized. Spectral comparisons to the Type IIb SN 2011dh indicate that the progenitor of PTF12os was surrounded by a hydrogen envelope with a mass lower than 0.02 solar masses. We also find tentative evidence that the progenitor of iPTF13bvn could have been surrounded by a small amount of hydrogen.
  • Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) arise from the core-collapse of H (and He) poor stars, which could be either single WR stars or lower-mass stars stripped of their envelope by a companion. Their light curves are radioactively powered and usually show a fast rise to peak ($\sim$10-15 d), without any early (first few days) emission bumps (with the exception of broad-lined SNe Ic) as sometimes seen for other types of stripped-envelope SNe (e.g., Type IIb SN 1993J and Type Ib SN 2008D). We have studied iPTF15dtg, a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with an early excess in the optical light curves followed by a long ($\sim$30 d) rise to the main peak. It is the first spectroscopically-normal double-peaked SN Ic observed. We aim to determine the properties of this explosion and of its progenitor star. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of iPTF15dtg was obtained with multiple telescopes. The resulting light curves and spectral sequence are analyzed and modelled with hydrodynamical and analytical models, with particular focus on the early emission. Results. iPTF15dtg is a slow rising SN Ic, similar to SN 2011bm. Hydrodynamical modelling of the bolometric properties reveals a large ejecta mass ($\sim$10 $M_{\odot}$) and strong $^{56}$Ni mixing. The luminous early emission can be reproduced if we account for the presence of an extended ($\sim$500 R$_{\odot}$), low-mass ($\sim$0.045 M$_{\odot}$) envelope around the progenitor star. Alternative scenarios for the early peak, such as the interaction with a companion, a shock-breakout (SBO) cooling tail from the progenitor surface, or a magnetar-driven SBO are not favored. The large ejecta mass and the presence of H and He free extended material around the star suggest that the progenitor of iPTF15dtg was a massive ($\gtrsim$ 35 M$_{\odot}$) WR star suffering strong mass loss.