• The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared (IR) wavelengths ($3.4,\ 4.6,\ 12,$ and $22\, \mu$m, Wright et al. 2010). This all-sky IR photometric survey makes it possible to leverage many of the large publicly available spectroscopic redshift surveys to measure galaxy properties in the IR. While characterizing the cross-matching of WISE data to a single survey is a straightforward process, doing it with six different redshift surveys takes a fair amount of space to characterize adequately, because each survey has unique caveats and characteristics that need addressing. This work describes a data set that results from matching five public redshift surveys with the AllWISE data release, along with a reanalysis of the data described in Lake et al. 2012. The combined data set has an additional flux limit of $80\,\mu$Jy ($19.14$ AB mag) in WISE's W1 filter imposed in order to limit it to targets with high completeness and reliable photometry in the AllWISE data set. Consistent analysis of all of the data is only possible if the color bias discussed in Ilbert et al. (2004) is addressed (for example: the techniques explored in the first paper in this series Lake et al. 2017b). The sample defined herein is used in this paper's sequel paper, Lake et al. 2017a), to measure the luminosity function of galaxies at $2.4\, \mu$m rest frame wavelength, and the selection process of the sample is optimized for this purpose.
  • The WISE satellite surveyed the entire sky multiple times in four infrared wavelengths (3.4, 4.6, 12, and $22\,\mu$m; Wright et al. 2010). The unprecedented combination of coverage area and depth gives us the opportunity to measure the luminosity function of galaxies, one of the fundamental quantities in the study of them, at $2.4\ \mu$m to an unparalleled level of formal statistical accuracy in the near infrared. The big advantage of measuring luminosity functions at wavelengths in the window $\approx 2$ to $3.5\,\mu$m is that it correlates more closely to the total stellar mass in galaxies than others. In this paper we report on the parameters for the $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity function of galaxies obtained from applying the spectroluminosity functional based methods defined in Lake et al. (2017b) to the data sets described in Lake et al. (2017a) using the mean and covariance of $2.4\,\mu$m normalized SEDs from Lake & Wright (2016). In terms of single Schechter function parameters evaluated at the present epoch, the combined result is: $\phi_\star = 5.8 \pm [0.3_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$, $L_\star = 6.4 \pm [0.1_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.3_{\mathrm{sys}}] \times 10^{10}\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($M_\star = -21.67 \pm [0.02_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.05_{\mathrm{sys}}]\operatorname{AB\ mag}$), and $\alpha = -1.050 \pm [0.004_{\mathrm{stat}},\, 0.03_{\mathrm{sys}}]$, corresponding to a galaxy number density of $0.08\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $10^6\, L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}$ ($10^{-3} \operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$ brighter than $L_\star$) and a $2.4\,\mu$m luminosity density equivalent to $3.8\times10^{8}\,L_{2.4\,\mu\mathrm{m}\,\odot}\operatorname{Mpc}^{-3}$. $\ldots$
  • The astronomy community has at its disposal a large back catalog of public spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys that can be used for the measurement of luminosity functions. Utilizing the back catalog with new photometric surveys to maximum efficiency requires modeling the color selection bias imposed on selection of target galaxies by flux limits at multiple wavelengths. The likelihood derived herein can address, in principle, all possible color selection biases through the use of a generalization of the luminosity function, $\Phi(L)$, over the space of all spectra: the spectro-luminosity functional, $\Psi[L_\nu]$. It is, therefore, the first estimator capable of simultaneously analyzing multiple redshift surveys in a consistent way. We also propose a new way of parametrizing the evolution of the classic Shechter function parameters, $L_\star$ and $\phi_\star$, that improves both the physical realism and statistical performance of the model. The techniques derived in this work will be used in an upcoming paper to measure the luminosity function of galaxies at the rest frame wavelength of $2.4\operatorname{\mu m}$ using the Widefield Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).
  • The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid's surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially-resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.
  • In this paper we provide formulae that can be used to determine the uncertainty contributed to a measurement by a $K$-correction and, thus, valuable information about which flux measurement will provide the most accurate $K$-corrected luminosity. All of this is done at the level of a Gaussian approximation of the statistics involved, that is, where the galaxies in question can be characterized by a mean spectral energy distribution (SED) and a covariance function (spectral 2-point function). This paper also includes approximations of the SED mean and covariance for galaxies, and the three common subclasses thereof, based on applying the templates from Assef et al. (2010) to the objects in zCOSMOS bright 10k (Lilly et al. 2009) and photometry of the same field from Capak et al. (2007), Sanders et al. (2007), and the AllWISE source catalog.
  • The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids and 8,885 other asteroids. $84\%$ of the near-Earth asteroids did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within $ \pm \sim20\%$ and $\pm\sim40\%$, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large ($>100$ m), and have low albedos.
  • We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 7,959 asteroids detected in the first year of the NEOWISE Reactivation mission. 201 are near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). 7,758 are Main Belt or Mars-crossing asteroids. 17% of these objects have not been previously characterized using WISE or NEOWISE thermal measurements. Diameters are determined to an accuracy of ~20% or better. If good-quality H magnitudes are available, albedos can be determined to within ~40% or better.
  • Planck Collaboration: P. A. R. Ade, N. Aghanim, M. Arnaud, M. Ashdown, J. Aumont, C. Baccigalupi, A. J. Banday, R. B. Barreiro, R. Barrena, J. G. Bartlett, N. Bartolo, E. Battaner, R. Battye, K. Benabed, A. Benoît, A. Benoit-Lévy, J.-P. Bernard, M. Bersanelli, P. Bielewicz, I. Bikmaev, H. Böhringer, A. Bonaldi, L. Bonavera, J. R. Bond, J. Borrill, F. R. Bouchet, M. Bucher, R. Burenin, C. Burigana, R. C. Butler, E. Calabrese, J.-F. Cardoso, P. Carvalho, A. Catalano, A. Challinor, A. Chamballu, R.-R. Chary, H. C. Chiang, G. Chon, P. R. Christensen, D. L. Clements, S. Colombi, L. P. L. Colombo, C. Combet, B. Comis, F. Couchot, A. Coulais, B. P. Crill, A. Curto, F. Cuttaia, H. Dahle, L. Danese, R. D. Davies, R. J. Davis, P. de Bernardis, A. de Rosa, G. de Zotti, J. Delabrouille, F.-X. Désert, C. Dickinson, J. M. Diego, K. Dolag, H. Dole, S. Donzelli, O. Doré, M. Douspis, A. Ducout, X. Dupac, G. Efstathiou, P. R. M. Eisenhardt, F. Elsner, T. A. Enßlin, H. K. Eriksen, E. Falgarone, J. Fergusson, F. Feroz, A. Ferragamo, F. Finelli, O. Forni, M. Frailis, A. A. Fraisse, E. Franceschi, A. Frejsel, S. Galeotta, S. Galli, K. Ganga, R. T. Génova-Santos, M. Giard, Y. Giraud-Héraud, E. Gjerløw, J. González-Nuevo, K. M. Górski, K. J. B. Grainge, S. Gratton, A. Gregorio, A. Gruppuso, J. E. Gudmundsson, F. K. Hansen, D. Hanson, D. L. Harrison, A. Hempel, S. Henrot-Versillé, C. Hernández-Monteagudo, D. Herranz, S. R. Hildebrandt, E. Hivon, M. Hobson, W. A. Holmes, A. Hornstrup, W. Hovest, K. M. Huffenberger, G. Hurier, A. H. Jaffe, T. R. Jaffe, T. Jin, W. C. Jones, M. Juvela, E. Keihänen, R. Keskitalo, I. Khamitov, T. S. Kisner, R. Kneissl, J. Knoche, M. Kunz, H. Kurki-Suonio, G. Lagache, J.-M. Lamarre, A. Lasenby, M. Lattanzi, C. R. Lawrence, R. Leonardi, J. Lesgourgues, F. Levrier, M. Liguori, P. B. Lilje, M. Linden-Vørnle, M. López-Caniego, P. M. Lubin, J. F. Macías-Pérez, G. Maggio, D. Maino, D. S. Y. Mak, N. Mandolesi, A. Mangilli, P. G. Martin, E. Martínez-González, S. Masi, S. Matarrese, P. Mazzotta, P. McGehee, S. Mei, A. Melchiorri, J.-B. Melin, L. Mendes, A. Mennella, M. Migliaccio, S. Mitra, M.-A. Miville-Deschênes, A. Moneti, L. Montier, G. Morgante, D. Mortlock, A. Moss, D. Munshi, J. A. Murphy, P. Naselsky, A. Nastasi, F. Nati, P. Natoli, C. B. Netterfield, H. U. Nørgaard-Nielsen, F. Noviello, D. Novikov, I. Novikov, M. Olamaie, C. A. Oxborrow, F. Paci, L. Pagano, F. Pajot, D. Paoletti, F. Pasian, G. Patanchon, T. J. Pearson, O. Perdereau, L. Perotto, Y. C. Perrott, F. Perrotta, V. Pettorino, F. Piacentini, M. Piat, E. Pierpaoli, D. Pietrobon, S. Plaszczynski, E. Pointecouteau, G. Polenta, G. W. Pratt, G. Prézeau, S. Prunet, J.-L. Puget, J. P. Rachen, W. T. Reach, R. Rebolo, M. Reinecke, M. Remazeilles, C. Renault, A. Renzi, I. Ristorcelli, G. Rocha, C. Rosset, M. Rossetti, G. Roudier, E. Rozo, J. A. Rubiño-Martín, C. Rumsey, B. Rusholme, E. S. Rykoff, M. Sandri, D. Santos, R. D. E. Saunders, M. Savelainen, G. Savini, M. P. Schammel, D. Scott, M. D. Seiffert, E. P. S. Shellard, T. W. Shimwell, L. D. Spencer, S. A. Stanford, D. Stern, V. Stolyarov, R. Stompor, A. Streblyanska, R. Sudiwala, R. Sunyaev, D. Sutton, A.-S. Suur-Uski, J.-F. Sygnet, J. A. Tauber, L. Terenzi, L. Toffolatti, M. Tomasi, D. Tramonte, M. Tristram, M. Tucci, J. Tuovinen, G. Umana, L. Valenziano, J. Valiviita, B. Van Tent, P. Vielva, F. Villa, L. A. Wade, B. D. Wandelt, I. K. Wehus, S. D. M. White, E. L. Wright, D. Yvon, A. Zacchei, A. Zonca
    Feb. 5, 2015 astro-ph.CO
    We present the all-sky Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources detected from the 29 month full-mission data. The catalogue (PSZ2) is the largest SZ-selected sample of galaxy clusters yet produced and the deepest all-sky catalogue of galaxy clusters. It contains 1653 detections, of which 1203 are confirmed clusters with identified counterparts in external data-sets, and is the first SZ-selected cluster survey containing > $10^3$ confirmed clusters. We present a detailed analysis of the survey selection function in terms of its completeness and statistical reliability, placing a lower limit of 83% on the purity. Using simulations, we find that the Y5R500 estimates are robust to pressure-profile variation and beam systematics, but accurate conversion to Y500 requires. the use of prior information on the cluster extent. We describe the multi-wavelength search for counterparts in ancillary data, which makes use of radio, microwave, infra-red, optical and X-ray data-sets, and which places emphasis on the robustness of the counterpart match. We discuss the physical properties of the new sample and identify a population of low-redshift X-ray under- luminous clusters revealed by SZ selection. These objects appear in optical and SZ surveys with consistent properties for their mass, but are almost absent from ROSAT X-ray selected samples.
  • We have carried out simulations to predict the performance of a new space-based telescopic survey operating at thermal infrared wavelengths that seeks to discover and characterize a large fraction of the potentially hazardous near-Earth asteroid (NEA) population. Two potential architectures for the survey were considered: one located at the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point, and one in a Venus-trailing orbit. A sample cadence was formulated and tested, allowing for the self-follow-up necessary for objects discovered in the daytime sky on Earth. Synthetic populations of NEAs with sizes >=140 m in effective spherical diameter were simulated using recent determinations of their physical and orbital properties. Estimates of the instrumental sensitivity, integration times, and slew speeds were included for both architectures assuming the properties of new large-format 10 um detector arrays capable of operating at ~35 K. Our simulation included the creation of a preliminary version of a moving object processing pipeline suitable for operating on the trial cadence. We tested this pipeline on a simulated sky populated with astrophysical sources such as stars and galaxies extrapolated from Spitzer and WISE data, the catalog of known minor planets (including Main Belt asteroids, comets, Jovian Trojans, etc.), and the synthetic NEA model. Trial orbits were computed for simulated position-time pairs extracted from the synthetic surveys to verify that the tested cadence would result in orbits suitable for recovering objects at a later time. Our results indicate that the Earth-Sun L1 and Venus-trailing surveys achieve similar levels of integral completeness for potentially hazardous asteroids larger than 140 m; placing the telescope in an interior orbit does not yield an improvement in discovery rates. This work serves as a necessary first step for the detailed planning of a next-generation NEA survey.
  • Only a very small fraction of the asteroid population at size scales comparable to the object that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia has been discovered to date, and physical properties are poorly characterized. We present previously unreported detections of 106 close approaching near-Earth objects (NEOs) by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission's NEOWISE project. These infrared observations constrain physical properties such as diameter and albedo for these objects, many of which are found to be smaller than 100 m. Because these objects are intrinsically faint, they were detected by WISE during very close approaches to the Earth, often at large apparent on-sky velocities. We observe a trend of increasing albedo with decreasing size, but as this sample of NEOs was discovered by visible light surveys, it is likely that selection biases against finding small, dark NEOs influence this finding.
  • In the local Universe, 10% of massive elliptical galaxies are observed to exhibit a peculiar property: a substantial excess of ultraviolet emission (UVX) over what is expected from their old, red stellar populations. Several origins for the UVX have been proposed, including a population of hot young stars, or a population of old, blue horizontal branch or extended horizontal branch (BHB or EHB) stars that have undergone substantial mass loss from their outer atmospheres. We explore the radial distribution of ultraviolet excess (UVX) in a selection of 49 nearby E/S0-type galaxies by measuring the extended photometry in the UV-midIR with GALEX, SDSS and WISE. We compare UV/optical and UV/mid-IR colors with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis with EHB models (Conroy & Gunn 2010). We find that combined WISE mid-IR and GALEX UV colors are more effective in distinguishing models than optical colors, and that the UV/mid-IR combination is sensitive to EHB fraction. There are strong color gradients with the outer radii bluer than the inner half-light radii by ~1 magnitude. This color difference is easily accounted for with a BHB fraction increase of 0.25 with radius. We estimated the average ages for the inner and outer radii are 7.0+/-0.3 Gyr, and 6.2+/-0.2 Gyr, respectively, with the implication that the outer regions are likely to have formed ~1 Gyr after the inner regions. Additionally, we find that metallicity gradients are likely not a significant factor in the color difference. The separation of color between the inner and outer regions, which agrees with a specific stellar population difference (e.g., higher EHB populations), and the ~0.5-2 Gyr age difference suggests multi-stage formation. Our results are best explained by inside-out formation: rapid star formation within the core at early epochs (>4 Gyr ago) and at least one later stage starburst event coinciding with z~1
  • We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the WMAP mission. We provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate CMB anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained LCDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that Big Bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (3.84+/-0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is 13.772+/-0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H0 = 69.32+/-0.80 km/s/Mpc. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity reported earlier by WMAP now has high statistical significance (n_s = 0.9608+/-0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean, Omega_k = -0.0027 (+0.0039/-0.0038). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six-parameter LCDM model, based on CMB data alone. For a model including tensors, the allowed seven-parameter volume has been reduced by a factor 117,000. Other cosmological observations are in accord with the CMB predictions, and the combined data reduces the cosmological parameter volume even further. With no significant anomalies and an adequate goodness-of-fit, the inflationary flat LCDM model and its precise and accurate parameters rooted in WMAP data stands as the standard model of cosmology.
  • We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year WMAP data, in conjunction with additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter LCDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l CMB anisotropy, the BAO scale, and the Hubble constant, the densities, Omegabh2, Omegach2, and Omega_L, are each determined to a precision of ~1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5sigma level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional LCDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their LCDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are presented, for example: the fractional contribution of tensor modes is limited to r<0.13 (95% CL); the spatial curvature parameter is limited to -0.0027 (+0.0039/-0.0038); the summed mass of neutrinos is <0.44 eV (95% CL); and the number of relativistic species is found to be 3.84+/-0.40 when the full data are analyzed. The joint constraint on Neff and the primordial helium abundance agrees with the prediction of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We compare recent PLANCK measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with our seven-year measurements, and show their mutual agreement. Our analysis of the polarization pattern around temperature extrema is updated. This confirms a fundamental prediction of the standard cosmological model and provides a striking illustration of acoustic oscillations and adiabatic initial conditions in the early universe.
  • Enhancements to the science data processing pipeline of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Explorer (WISE) mission, collectively known as NEOWISE, resulted in the detection of $>$158,000 minor planets in four infrared wavelengths during the fully cryogenic portion of the mission. Following the depletion of its cryogen, NASA's Planetary Science Directorate funded a four month extension to complete the survey of the inner edge of the Main Asteroid Belt and to detect and discover near-Earth objects (NEOs). This extended survey phase, known as the NEOWISE Post-Cryogenic Survey, resulted in the detection of $\sim$6500 large Main Belt asteroids and 88 NEOs in its 3.4 and 4.6 $\mu$m channels. During the Post-Cryogenic Survey, NEOWISE discovered and detected a number of asteroids co-orbital with the Earth and Mars, including the first known Earth Trojan. We present preliminary thermal fits for these and other NEOs detected during the 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-Cryogenic Surveys.
  • The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is an extremely capable and efficient black hole finder. We present a simple mid-infrared color criterion, W1-W2 \geq 0.8 (i.e., [3.4]-[4.6] \geq 0.8, Vega), which identifies 61.9 \pm 5.4 AGN candidates per deg2 to a depth of W2 = 15.0. This implies a much larger census of luminous AGN than found by typical wide-area surveys, attributable to the fact that mid-infrared selection identifies both unobscured (type 1) and obscured (type 2) AGN. Optical and soft X-ray surveys alone are highly biased towards only unobscured AGN, while this simple WISE selection likely identifies even heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGN. Using deep, public data in the COSMOS field, we explore the properties of WISE-selected AGN candidates. At the mid-infrared depth considered, 160 uJy at 4.6 microns, this simple criterion identifies 78% of Spitzer mid-infrared AGN candidates according to the criteria of Stern et al. (2005) and the reliability is 95%. We explore the demographics, multiwavelength properties and redshift distribution of WISE-selected AGN candidates in the COSMOS field.
  • We present a reanalysis of the relationship between asteroid albedo and polarization properties using the albedos derived from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. We find that the function that best describes this relation is a three-dimensional linear fit in the space of log(albedo)-log(polarization slope)-log(minimum polarization). When projected to two dimensions the parameters of the fit are consistent with those found in previous work. We also define p* as the quantity of maximal polarization variation when compared with albedo and present the best fitting albedo-p* relation. Some asteroid taxonomic types stand out in this three-dimensional space, notably the E, B, and M Tholen types, while others cluster in clumps coincident with the S- and C-complex bodies. We note that both low albedo and small (D<30 km) asteroids are under-represented in the polarimetric sample, and we encourage future polarimetric surveys to focus on these bodies.
  • We present initial results from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a four-band all-sky thermal infrared survey that produces data well suited to measuring the physical properties of asteroids, and the NEOWISE enhancement to the WISE mission allowing for detailed study of Solar system objects. Using a NEATM thermal model fitting routine we compute diameters for over 100,000 Main Belt asteroids from their IR thermal flux, with errors better than 10%. We then incorporate literature values of visible measurements (in the form of the H absolute magnitude) to determine albedos. Using these data we investigate the albedo and diameter distributions of the Main Belt. As observed previously, we find a change in the average albedo when comparing the inner, middle, and outer portions of the Main Belt. We also confirm that the albedo distribution of each region is strongly bimodal. We observe groupings of objects with similar albedos in regions of the Main Belt associated with dynamical breakup families. Asteroid families typically show a characteristic albedo for all members, but there are notable exceptions to this. This paper is the first look at the Main Belt asteroids in the WISE data, and only represents the preliminary, observed raw size and albedo distributions for the populations considered. These distributions are subject to survey biases inherent to the NEOWISE dataset and cannot yet be interpreted as describing the true populations; the debiased size and albedo distributions will be the subject of the next paper in this series.
  • [Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show a rapidly steepening spectrum from 20-40 GHz, which may be due to emission from spinning dust grains, steepening synchrotron, or other effects. Comparisons are made to a 1-degree 408 MHz map (Haslam et al.) and the 11-degree ARCADE 2 data (Singal et al.). We find that spinning dust or steepening synchrotron models fit the combination of WMAP and 408 MHz data equally well. ARCADE data appear inconsistent with the steepening synchrotron model, and consistent with the spinning dust model, though some discrepancies remain regarding the relative strength of spinning dust emission. More high-resolution data in the 10-40 GHz range would shed much light on these issues.
  • (Abridged) The 7-year WMAP data and improved astrophysical data rigorously test the standard cosmological model and its extensions. By combining WMAP with the latest distance measurements from BAO and H0 measurement, we determine the parameters of the simplest LCDM model. The power-law index of the primordial power spectrum is n_s=0.968+-0.012, a measurement that excludes the scale-invariant spectrum by 99.5%CL. The other parameters are also improved from the 5-year results. Notable examples of improved parameters are the total mass of neutrinos, sum(m_nu)<0.58eV, and the effective number of neutrino species, N_eff=4.34+0.86-0.88. We detect the effect of primordial helium on the temperature power spectrum and provide a new test of big bang nucleosynthesis. We detect, and show on the map for the first time, the tangential and radial polarization patterns around hot and cold spots of temperature fluctuations, an important test of physical processes at z=1090 and the dominance of adiabatic scalar fluctuations. With the 7-year TB power spectrum, the limit on a rotation of the polarization plane due to potential parity-violating effects has improved to Delta(alpha)=-1.1+-1.4(stat)+-1.5(syst) degrees. We report significant detections of the SZ effect at the locations of known clusters of galaxies. The measured SZ signal agrees well with the expected signal from the X-ray data. However, it is a factor of 0.5 to 0.7 times the predictions from "universal profile" of Arnaud et al., analytical models, and hydrodynamical simulations. We find, for the first time in the SZ effect, a significant difference between the cooling-flow and non-cooling-flow clusters (or relaxed and non-relaxed clusters), which can explain some of the discrepancy. This lower amplitude is consistent with the lower-than-theoretically-expected SZ power spectrum recently measured by the South Pole Telescope collaboration.
  • (Abridged) We present the angular power spectra derived from the 7-year maps and discuss the cosmological conclusions that can be inferred from WMAP data alone. The third acoustic peak in the TT spectrum is now well measured by WMAP. In the context of a flat LambdaCDM model, this improvement allows us to place tighter constraints on the matter density from WMAP data alone, and on the epoch of matter-radiation equality, The temperature-polarization (TE) spectrum is detected in the 7-year data with a significance of 20 sigma, compared to 13 sigma with the 5-year data. The low-l EE spectrum, a measure of the optical depth due to reionization, is detected at 5.5 sigma significance when averaged over l = 2-7. The BB spectrum, an important probe of gravitational waves from inflation, remains consistent with zero. The upper limit on tensor modes from polarization data alone is a factor of 2 lower with the 7-year data than it was using the 5-year data (Komatsu et al. 2010). We test the parameter recovery process for bias and find that the scalar spectral index, ns, is biased high, but only by 0.09 sigma, while the remaining parameters are biased by < 0.15 sigma. The improvement in the third peak measurement leads to tighter lower limits from WMAP on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom (e.g., neutrinos) in the early universe: Neff > 2.7 (95% CL). Also, using WMAP data alone, the primordial helium mass fraction is found to be YHe = 0.28+0.14-0.15, and with data from higher-resolution CMB experiments included, we now establish the existence of pre-stellar helium at > 3 sigma (Komatsu et al. 2010).
  • (Abridged) New full sky temperature and polarization maps based on seven years of data from WMAP are presented. The new results are consistent with previous results, but have improved due to reduced noise from the additional integration time, improved knowledge of the instrument performance, and improved data analysis procedures. The improvements are described in detail. The seven year data set is well fit by a minimal six-parameter flat Lambda-CDM model. The parameters for this model, using the WMAP data in conjunction with baryon acoustic oscillation data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and priors on H_0 from Hubble Space Telescope observations, are: Omega_bh^2 = 0.02260 +-0.00053, Omega_ch^2 = 0.1123 +-0.0035, Omega_Lambda = 0.728 +0.015 -0.016, n_s = 0.963 +-0.012, tau = 0.087 +-0.014 and sigma_8 = 0.809 +-0.024 (68 % CL uncertainties). The temperature power spectrum signal-to-noise ratio per multipole is greater that unity for multipoles < 919, allowing a robust measurement of the third acoustic peak. This measurement results in improved constraints on the matter density, Omega_mh^2 = 0.1334 +0.0056 -0.0055, and the epoch of matter- radiation equality, z_eq = 3196 +134 -133, using WMAP data alone. The new WMAP data, when combined with smaller angular scale microwave background anisotropy data, results in a 3 sigma detection of the abundance of primordial Helium, Y_He = 0.326 +-0.075.The power-law index of the primordial power spectrum is now determined to be n_s = 0.963 +-0.012, excluding the Harrison-Zel'dovich-Peebles spectrum by >3 sigma. These new WMAP measurements provide important tests of Big Bang cosmology.
  • We describe a sampling method to estimate the polarized CMB signal from observed maps of the sky. We use a Metropolis-within-Gibbs algorithm to estimate the polarized CMB map, containing Q and U Stokes parameters at each pixel, and its covariance matrix. These can be used as inputs for cosmological analyses. The polarized sky signal is parameterized as the sum of three components: CMB, synchrotron emission, and thermal dust emission. The polarized Galactic components are modeled with spatially varying power law spectral indices for the synchrotron, and a fixed power law for the dust, and their component maps are estimated as by-products. We apply the method to simulated low resolution maps with pixels of side 7.2 degrees, using diagonal and full noise realizations drawn from the WMAP noise matrices. The CMB maps are recovered with goodness of fit consistent with errors. Computing the likelihood of the E-mode power in the maps as a function of optical depth to reionization, tau, for fixed temperature anisotropy power, we recover tau=0.091+-0.019 for a simulation with input tau=0.1, and mean tau=0.098 averaged over 10 simulations. A `null' simulation with no polarized CMB signal has maximum likelihood consistent with tau=0. The method is applied to the five-year WMAP data, using the K, Ka, Q and V channels. We find tau=0.090+-0.019, compared to tau=0.086+-0.016 from the template-cleaned maps used in the primary WMAP analysis. The synchrotron spectral index, beta, averaged over high signal-to-noise pixels with standard deviation sigma(beta)<0.25, but excluding ~6% of the sky masked in the Galactic plane, is -3.03+-0.04. This estimate does not vary significantly with Galactic latitude, although includes an informative prior.
  • The Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey (SDWFS) is a four-epoch infrared survey of ten square degrees in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey using the IRAC instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope. SDWFS, a Cycle four Spitzer Legacy project, occupies a unique position in the area-depth survey space defined by other Spitzer surveys. The four epochs that make up SDWFS permit -- for the first time -- the selection of infrared-variable and high proper motion objects over a wide field on timescales of years. Because of its large survey volume, SDWFS is sensitive to galaxies out to z~3 with relatively little impact from cosmic variance for all but the richest systems. The SDWFS datasets will thus be especially useful for characterizing galaxy evolution beyond z~1.5. This paper explains the SDWFS observing strategy and data processing, presents the SDWFS mosaics and source catalogs, and discusses some early scientific findings. The publicly-released, full-depth catalogs contain 6.78, 5.23, 1.20, and 0.96 x 10e5 distinct sources detected to the average 5-sigma, 4" diameter, aperture-corrected limits of 19.77, 18.83, 16.50, and 15.82 Vega mag at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 micron, respectively. The SDWFS number counts and color-color distribution are consistent with other, earlier Spitzer surveys. At the 6 min integration time of the SDWFS IRAC imaging, more than 50% of isolated FIRST radio sources and more than 80% of on-axis XBootes sources are detected out to 8.0 micron. Finally, we present the four highest proper motion IRAC-selected sources identified from the multi-epoch imaging, two of which are likely field brown dwarfs of mid-T spectral class.
  • We present a new estimate of foreground emission in the WMAP data, using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The new technique delivers maps of each foreground component for a variety of foreground models, error estimates of the uncertainty of each foreground component, and provides an overall goodness-of-fit measurement. The resulting foreground maps are in broad agreement with those from previous techniques used both within the collaboration and by other authors. We find that for WMAP data, a simple model with power-law synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust components fits 90% of the sky with a reduced chi-squared of 1.14. However, the model does not work well inside the Galactic plane. The addition of either synchrotron steepening or a modified spinning dust model improves the fit. This component may account for up to 14% of the total flux at Ka-band (33 GHz). We find no evidence for foreground contamination of the CMB temperature map in the 85% of the sky used for cosmological analysis.
  • This paper focuses on cosmological constraints derived from analysis of WMAP data alone. A simple LCDM cosmological model fits the five-year WMAP temperature and polarization data. The basic parameters of the model are consistent with the three-year data and now better constrained: Omega_b h^2 = 0.02273+-0.00062, Omega_c h^2 = 0.1099+-0.0062, Omega_L = 0.742+-0.030, n_s = 0.963+0.014- 0.015, tau = 0.087+-0.017, sigma_8 = 0.796+-0.036. With five years of polarization data, we have measured the optical depth to reionization, tau>0, at 5 sigma significance. The redshift of an instantaneous reionization is constrained to be z_reion = 11.0+-1.4 with 68% confidence. This excludes a sudden reionization of the universe at z=6 at more than 3.5 sigma significance, suggesting that reionization was an extended process. Using two methods for polarized foreground cleaning we get consistent estimates for the optical depth, indicating an error due to foreground treatment of tau~0.01. This cosmological model also fits small-scale CMB data, and a range of astronomical data measuring the expansion rate and clustering of matter in the universe. We find evidence for the first time in the CMB power spectrum for a non-zero cosmic neutrino background, or a background of relativistic species, with the standard three light neutrino species preferred over the best-fit LCDM model with N_eff=0 at >99.5% confidence, and N_eff > 2.3 (95% CL) when varied. The five-year WMAP data improve the upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r < 0.43 (95% CL), for power-law models. With longer integration we find no evidence for a running spectral index, with dn_s/dlnk = -0.037+-0.028.