• We present a 69 arcmin$^2$ ALMA survey at 1.1mm, GOODS-ALMA, matching the deepest HST-WFC3 H-band part of the GOODS-South field. We taper the 0"24 original image with a homogeneous and circular synthesized beam of 0"60 to reduce the number of independent beams - thus reducing the number of purely statistical spurious detections - and optimize the sensitivity to point sources. We extract a catalogue of galaxies purely selected by ALMA and identify sources with and without HST counterparts. ALMA detects 20 sources brighter than 0.7 mJy at 1.1mm in the 0"60 tapered mosaic (rms sensitivity $\sigma \simeq$ 0.18 mJy/beam) with a purity greater than 80%. Among these detections, we identify three sources with no HST nor Spitzer-IRAC counterpart, consistent with the expected number of spurious galaxies from the analysis of the inverted image; their definitive status will require additional investigation. An additional three sources with HST counterparts are detected either at high significance in the higher resolution map, or with different detection-algorithm parameters ensuring a purity greater than 80%. Hence we identify in total 20 robust detections. Our wide contiguous survey allows us to push further in redshift the blind detection of massive galaxies with ALMA with a median redshift of $\bar{z}$ = 2.92 and a median stellar mass of $\overline{M_{\star}}$ = 1.1 $\times 10^{11}$M$_\odot$. Our sample includes 20% HST-dark galaxies (4 out of 20), all detected in the mid-infrared with Spitzer-IRAC. The near-infrared based photometric redshifts of two of them ($z \sim$4.3 and 4.8) suggest that these sources have redshifts $z >$ 4. At least 40% of the ALMA sources host an X-ray AGN, compared to $\sim$14% for other galaxies of similar mass and redshift. The wide area of our ALMA survey provides lower values at the bright end of number counts than single-dish telescopes affected by confusion.
  • The Infra-Red Telescope (IRT) on board the Transient High Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor (THESEUS) ESA M5 candidate mission will play a key role in identifying and characterizing moderate to high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts afterglows. The IRT is the enabling instrument on board THESEUS for measuring autonomously the redshift of the several hundreds of GRBs detected per year by the Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) and the X- and Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (XGIS), and thus allowing the big ground based telescopes to be triggered on a redshift pre-selected sample, and finally fulfilling the cosmological goals of the mission. The IRT will be composed by a primary mirror of 0.7 m of diameter coupled to a single camera in a Cassegrain design. It will work in the 0.7-1.8 {\mu}m wavelength range, and will provide a 10x10 arc min imaging field of view with sub-arc second localization capabilities, and, at the same time, a 5x5 arc min field of view with moderate (R up to ~500) spectroscopic capabilities. Its sensitivity, mainly limited by the satellite jitter, is adapted to detect all the GRBs, localized by the SXI/XGIS, and to acquire spectra for the majority of them.
  • We report the detection of the CO(3-2) emission line from the host galaxy of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 080207 at $z$ = 2.086. This is the first detection of molecular gas in emission from a GRB host galaxy beyond redshift 1. We find this galaxy to be rich in molecular gas with a mass of $1.1 \times 10^{11}\,\rm M_{\odot}$ assuming $\alpha_{\rm CO}=$ 4.36 $\rm M_{\odot}(\rm K\,km\,s^{-1}\,pc^2)^{-1}$. The molecular gas mass fraction of the galaxy is $\sim$ 0.5, typical of star forming galaxies (SFGs) with similar stellar masses and redshifts. With a $\rm SFR_{FIR}$ of 260 $\rm M_{\odot}\,yr^{-1}$, we measure a molecular-gas-depletion timescale of 0.43 Gyr, near the peak of the depletion timescale distribution of SFGs at similar redshifts. Our findings are therefore in contradiction with the proposed molecular gas deficiency in GRB host galaxies. We argue that the reported molecular gas deficiency for GRB hosts could be the artifact of improper comparisons or neglecting the effect of the typical low metallicities of GRB hosts on the CO-to-molecular-gas conversion factor. We also compare the kinematics of the CO(3-2) emission line to that of the H$\alpha$ emission line from the host galaxy. We find the H$\alpha$ emission to have contributions from two separate components, a narrow and a broad one. The narrow component matches the CO emission well in velocity space. The broad component, with a FWHM of $\sim$ 1100 $\rm km\,s^{-1}$, is separated by $+390$ $\rm km\,s^{-1}$ in velocity space from the narrow component. We speculate this broad component to be associated with a powerful outflow in the host galaxy or in an interacting system.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the relations between gas kinematics, metallicity, and stellar mass in a sample of 82 GRB-selected galaxies using absorption and emission methods. We find the velocity widths of both emission and absorption profiles to be a proxy of stellar mass. We also investigate the velocity-metallicity correlation and its evolution with redshift and find the correlation derived from emission lines to have a significantly smaller scatter compared to that found using absorption lines. Using 33 GRB hosts with measured stellar mass and metallicitiy, we study the mass-metallicity relation for GRB host galaxies in a stellar mass range of $10^{8.2} M_{\odot}$ to $10^{11.1} M_{\odot}$ and a redshift range of $ z\sim 0.3-3.4$. The GRB-selected galaxies appear to track the mass-metallicity relation of star forming galaxies but with an offset of 0.15 towards lower metallicities. This offset is comparable with the average error-bar on the metallicity measurements of the GRB sample and also the scatter on the MZ relation of the general population. It is hard to decide whether this relatively small offset is due to systematic effects or the intrinsic nature of GRB hosts. We also investigate the possibility of using absorption-line metallicity measurements of GRB hosts to study the mass-metallicity relation at high redshifts. Our analysis shows that the metallicity measurements from absorption methods can significantly differ from emission metallicities and assuming identical measurements from the two methods may result in erroneous conclusions.
  • We present an analysis of high-resolution ALMA interferometry of CO(4-3) line emission and dust continuum in the "Ruby" (PLCK_G244.8+54.9), a bright, gravitationally lensed galaxy at z = 3.0 discovered with the Planck all-sky survey. The Ruby is the brightest of Planck's Dusty GEMS, a sample of 11 of the brightest gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies on the extragalactic sub-mm sky. We resolve the high-surface-brightness continuum and CO line emission of the Ruby in several extended clumps along a partial, nearly circular Einstein ring with 1.4" diameter around a massive galaxy at z = 1.5. Local star-formation intensities are up to 2000 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-2}$, amongst the highest observed at high redshift, and clearly in the range of maximal starbursts. Gas-mass surface densities are a few $\times$ 10$^4$ M$_{\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$. The Ruby lies at, and in part even above, the starburst sequence in the Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram, and at the limit expected for star formation that is self-regulated through the kinetic energy injection from radiation pressure, stellar winds, and supernovae. We show that these processes can also inject sufficient kinetic energy and momentum into the gas to explain the turbulent line widths, which are consistent with marginally gravitationally bound molecular clouds embedded in a critically Toomre-stable disk. The star-formation efficiency is in the range 1-10% per free-fall time, consistent with the notion that the pressure balance that sets the local star-formation law in the Milky Way may well be universal out to the highest star-formation intensities. AGN feedback is not necessary to regulate the star formation in the Ruby, in agreement with the absence of a bright AGN component in the infrared and radio regimes.
  • We present deep ALMA CO(5-4) observations of a main sequence, clumpy galaxy at z=1.5 in the HUDF. Thanks to the ~0.5" resolution of the ALMA data, we can link stellar population properties to the CO(5-4) emission on scales of a few kpc. We detect strong CO(5-4) emission from the nuclear region of the galaxy, consistent with the observed $L_{\rm IR}$-$L^{\prime}_{\rm CO(5-4)}$ correlation and indicating on-going nuclear star formation. The CO(5-4) gas component appears more concentrated than other star formation tracers or the dust distribution in this galaxy. We discuss possible implications of this difference in terms of star formation efficiency and mass build-up at the galaxy centre. Conversely, we do not detect any CO(5-4) emission from the UV-bright clumps. This might imply that clumps have a high star formation efficiency (although they do not display unusually high specific star formation rates) and are not entirely gas dominated, with gas fractions no larger than that of their host galaxy (~50%). Stellar feedback and disk instability torques funnelling gas towards the galaxy centre could contribute to the relatively low gas content. Alternatively, clumps could fall in a more standard star formation efficiency regime if their actual star-formation rates are lower than generally assumed. We find that clump star-formation rates derived with several different, plausible methods can vary by up to an order of magnitude. The lowest estimates would be compatible with a CO(5-4) non-detection even for main-sequence like values of star formation efficiency and gas content.
  • We measure the stellar mass function (SMF) of galaxies in the COSMOS field up to $z\sim6$. We select them in the near-IR bands of the COSMOS2015 catalogue, which includes ultra-deep photometry from UltraVISTA-DR2, SPLASH, and Subaru/Hyper-SuprimeCam. At $z>2.5$ we use new precise photometric redshifts with error $\sigma_z=0.03(1+z)$ and an outlier fraction of $12\%$, estimated by means of the unique spectroscopic sample of COSMOS. The increased exposure time in the DR2, along with our panchromatic detection strategy, allow us to improve the stellar mass completeness at high $z$ with respect to previous UltraVISTA catalogues. We also identify passive galaxies through a robust colour-colour selection, extending their SMF estimate up to $z=4$. Our work provides a comprehensive view of galaxy stellar mass assembly between $z=0.1$ and 6, for the first time using consistent estimates across the entire redshift range. We fit these measurements with a Schechter function, correcting for Eddington bias. We compare the SMF fit with the halo mass function predicted from $\Lambda$CDM simulations. We find that at $z>3$ both functions decline with a similar slope in the high-mass end. This feature could be explained assuming that the mechanisms that quench star formation in massive haloes become less effective at high redshift; however further work needs to be done to confirm this scenario. Concerning the SMF low-mass end, it shows a progressive steepening as moving towards higher redshifts, with $\alpha$ decreasing from $-1.47_{-0.02}^{+0.02}$ at $z\simeq0.1$ to $-2.11_{-0.13}^{+0.30}$ at $z\simeq5$. This slope depends on the characterisation of the observational uncertainties, which is crucial to properly remove the Eddington bias. We show that there is currently no consensus on the method to quantify such errors: different error models result in different best-fit Schechter parameters. [Abridged]
  • We study the properties of the foreground galaxy of the Ruby, the brightest gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxy on the sub-millimeter sky as probed by the Planck satellite, and part of our sample of Planck's Dusty GEMS. The Ruby consists of an Einstein ring of 1.4" diameter at z = 3.005 observed with ALMA at 0.1" resolution, centered on a faint, red, massive lensing galaxy seen with HST/WFC3, which itself has an exceptionally high redshift, z = 1.525 $\pm$ 0.001, as confirmed with VLT/X-Shooter spectroscopy. Here we focus on the properties of the lens and the lensing model obtained with LENSTOOL. The rest-frame optical morphology of this system is strongly dominated by the lens, while the Ruby itself is highly obscured, and contributes less than 10% to the photometry out to the K band. The foreground galaxy has a lensing mass of (3.70 $\pm$ 0.35) $\times$ 10$^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$. Magnification factors are between 7 and 38 for individual clumps forming two image families along the Einstein ring. We present a decomposition of the foreground and background sources in the WFC3 images, and stellar population synthesis modeling with a range of star-formation histories for Chabrier and Salpeter initial mass functions (IMFs). Only the stellar mass range obtained with the latter agrees well with the lensing mass. This is consistent with the bottom-heavy IMFs of massive high-redshift galaxies expected from detailed studies of the stellar masses and mass profiles of their low-redshift descendants, and from models of turbulent gas fragmentation. This may be the first direct constraint on the IMF in a lens at z = 1.5, which is not a cluster central galaxy.
  • We present spatially resolved ALMA [CII] observations of the bright (flux density S=400 mJy at 350 microns), gravitationally lensed, starburst galaxy PLCK G045.1+61.1 at z=3.427, the "Garnet". This source is part of our set of "Planck's Dusty GEMS", discovered with the Planck's all-sky survey. Two emission-line clouds with a relative velocity offset of ~600 km/s extend towards north-east and south-west, respectively, of a small, intensely star-forming clump with a star-formation intensity of 220 Msun/yr/kpc^2, akin to maximal starbursts. [CII] is also seen in absorption, with a redshift of +350 km/s relative to the brightest CO component. [CII] absorption has previously only been found in the Milky Way along sightlines toward bright high-mass star-forming regions, and this is the first detection in another galaxy. Similar to Galactic environments, the [CII] absorption feature is associated with [CI] emission, implying that this is diffuse gas shielded from the UV radiation of the clump, and likely at large distances from the clump. Since absorption can only be seen in front of a continuum source, the gas in this structure can definitely be attributed to gas flowing towards the clump. The absorber could be part of a cosmic filament or merger debris being accreted onto the galaxy. We discuss our results also in light of the on-going debate of the origin of the [CII] deficit in dusty star-forming galaxies.
  • We have recently suggested that gas accretion can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [CII] 158 um and [OI] 63 um spectroscopy, as well as APEX CO(2-1) and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. It has elevated [CII]/FIR and [OI]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rate (SFR) derived from line ([CII], [OI], Ha) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [CII] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy center, whereas [OI] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [OI] flux indicates high radiation field and gas density. The [CII]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [CII]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. The [OI] and HI concentrations, and the high radiation field and density are consistent with the hypothesis of a very recent (at most a few tens of Myr ago) inflow of atomic gas triggering star formation. Dust has not had time to build up (explaining high line-to-continuum ratios). Such a recent enhancement of star-formation would indeed manifest itself in high SFR_line/SFR_continuum ratios, because the line indicators are sensitive only to recent (<10 Myr) activity, whereas the continuum indicators measure the SFR averaged over much longer periods (~100 Myr). Other GRB hosts exhibit a mean SFR_line/SFR_continuum of 1.74+-0.32. This is consistent with a very recent enhancement of star formation being common among GRB hosts, so galaxies which have recently experienced inflow of gas may preferentially host stars exploding as GRBs. Hence GRB hosts may be used to investigate recent gas accretion.
  • We present the COSMOS2015 catalog which contains precise photometric redshifts and stellar masses for more than half a million objects over the 2deg$^{2}$ COSMOS field. Including new $YJHK_{\rm s}$ images from the UltraVISTA-DR2 survey, $Y$-band from Subaru/Hyper-Suprime-Cam and infrared data from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with the Hyper-Suprime-Cam Spitzer legacy program, this near-infrared-selected catalog is highly optimized for the study of galaxy evolution and environments in the early Universe. To maximise catalog completeness for bluer objects and at higher redshifts, objects have been detected on a $\chi^{2}$ sum of the $YJHK_{\rm s}$ and $z^{++}$ images. The catalog contains $\sim 6\times 10^5$ objects in the 1.5 deg$^{2}$ UltraVISTA-DR2 region, and $\sim 1.5\times 10^5$ objects are detected in the "ultra-deep stripes" (0.62 deg$^{2}$) at $K_{\rm s}\leq 24.7$ (3$\sigma$, 3", AB magnitude). Through a comparison with the zCOSMOS-bright spectroscopic redshifts, we measure a photometric redshift precision of $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_s)}$ = 0.007 and a catastrophic failure fraction of $\eta=0.5$%. At $3<z<6$, using the unique database of spectroscopic redshifts in COSMOS, we find $\sigma_{\Delta z/(1+z_s)}$ = 0.021 and $\eta=13.2\% $. The deepest regions reach a 90\% completeness limit of 10$^{10}M_\odot$ to $z=4$. Detailed comparisons of the color distributions, number counts, and clustering show excellent agreement with the literature in the same mass ranges. COSMOS2015 represents a unique, publicly available, valuable resource with which to investigate the evolution of galaxies within their environment back to the earliest stages of the history of the Universe. The COSMOS2015 catalog is distributed via anonymous ftp (ftp://ftp.iap.fr/pub/from_users/hjmcc/COSMOS2015/) and through the usual astronomical archive systems (CDS, ESO Phase 3, IRSA).
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and could thus be a potentially powerful tool to trace cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z < 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the impact of the environment on GRB formation. We study host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z < 1 bright LGRBs. We use the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR) and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplement the data set with previously measured stellar masses M$_{\star}$. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M$_{\star}$ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies.We find that LGRB hosts at z < 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star-formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to Z $\sim 8.4-8.5$, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are not inconsistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z < 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevent us from reaching more quantitative conclusions.
  • We present an analysis of the morphological classification of 89 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample using non-parametric coefficients and compare their morphology as a function of wavelength. We rely on images obtained in the optical (B- and I-band) as well as in the infrared (H-band and 5.8$\mu$m). Our classification is based on the calculation of $Gini$ and the second order of light ($M_{20}$) non-parametric coefficients which we explore as a function of stellar mass ($M_\star$), infrared luminosity ($L_{IR}$) and star formation rate (SFR). We investigate the relation between $M_{20}$, the specific SFR (sSFR) and the dust temperature ($T_{dust}$) in our galaxy sample. We find that $M_{20}$ is a better morphological tracer than $Gini$, as it allows to distinguish systems formed by double systems from isolated and post-merger LIRGs. The multi-wavelength analysis allows us to identify a region in the $Gini$-$M_{20}$ parameter space where ongoing mergers reside, regardless of the band used to calculate the coefficients. In particular when measured in the H-band, this region can be used to identify ongoing mergers, with a minimal contamination from LIRGs in other stages. We also find that while the sSFR is positively correlated with $M_{20}$ when measured in the mid-infrared, i.e. star-bursting galaxies show more compact emission, it is anti-correlated with the B-band based $M_{20}$. We interpret this as the spatial decoupling between obscured and un-obscured star formation, whereby the ultraviolet/optical size of a LIRGs experience an intense dust enshrouded central starburst is larger than in the one in the mid-infrared since the contrast between the nuclear to the extended disk emission is smaller in the mid-infrared. This has important implications for high redshift surveys of dusty sources. [abridged]
  • We present new data for four candidate obscured Compton-Thick (CT) quasars at z $\sim$1-2.5 observed with SINFONI VLT spectrograph in AO mode. These sources were selected from a 24$\mu$m Spitzer MIPS survey of the COSMOS field, on the basis of red mid-infrared-to-optical and optical-to-near-infrared colours, with the intention of identifying active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in dust enshrouded environments, where most of the black hole mass is assembled in dust enshrouded environments. Near infrared spectra were analyzed in order to check for emission line features and to search for broad components in the [OIII]-H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$-[NII] regions. X-ray spectral analysis, radio and MIR diagnostics, and SED fitting have also been employed to study the nature of the sources. We successfully identified three objects for which we had only a photometric redshift estimate. Based on their emission line diagnostics and on ancillary multi-wavelength constraints, we find that all four targets harbor obscured AGNs. Broad profiles that could be attributed to the effects of outflows are revealed in only one target, MIRO20581. In particular, we clearly resolved a fast ($\sim$1600 km/s) and extended ($\sim$5 kpc) outflow in the [OIII]5007 emission line. This feature, the commonly used indicator for ionised outflowing gas, was sampled and detected only for this target; hence, we can not exclude the presence of outflows in the other sources. Overall, the constraints we obtain from our targets and from other comparative samples from the literature suggest that these optically faint luminous infrared galaxies, hosting obscured AGNs, may represent a brief evolutionary phase between the post-merger starburst and the unobscured QSO phases.
  • Long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), among the most energetic events in the Universe, are explosions of massive and short-lived stars, so they pinpoint locations of recent star formation. However, several GRB host galaxies have recently been found to be deficient in molecular gas (H2), believed to be the fuel of star formation. Moreover, optical spectroscopy of GRB afterglows implies that the molecular phase constitutes only a small fraction of the gas along the GRB line-of-sight. Here we report the first ever 21 cm line observations of GRB host galaxies, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, implying high levels of atomic hydrogen (HI), which suggests that the connection between atomic gas and star formation is stronger than previously thought, with star formation being potentially directly fuelled by atomic gas (or with very efficient HI-to-H2 conversion and rapid exhaustion of molecular gas), as has been theoretically shown to be possible. This can happen in low metallicity gas near the onset of star formation, because cooling of gas (necessary for star formation) is faster than the HI-to-H2 conversion. Indeed, large atomic gas reservoirs, together with low molecular gas masses, stellar and dust masses are consistent with GRB hosts being preferentially galaxies which have very recently started a star formation episode after accreting metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. This provides a natural route for forming GRBs in low-metallicity environments. The gas inflow scenario is also consistent with the existence of the companion HI object with no optical counterpart ~19 kpc from the GRB 060505 host, and with the fact that the HI centroids of the GRB 980425 and 060505 hosts do not coincide with optical centres of these galaxies, but are located close to the GRB positions.
  • LGRBs are associated with massive stars and are therefore linked to star formation. The conditions necessary to produce LGRBs can affect the relation between the LGRB rate and star formation. By using the power of a complete LGRB sample, our aim is to understand whether such a bias exists and, if it does, what is its origin. In this first paper, we build the SED of the z<1 host galaxies of the BAT6 LGRB sample, and determine their stellar masses from SED fitting. We compare the resulting stellar mass distribution (i) with star-forming galaxies observed in deep surveys (UltraVISTA); (ii) with semi-analitical models of the z<1 star forming galaxy population and (iii) with numerical simulations of LGRB hosts having different metallicity thresholds for the progenitor star environment. We find that at z<1 LGRBs tend to avoid massive galaxies and are powerful in selecting faint low-mass star-forming galaxies. The stellar mass distribution of the hosts is not consistent with that of the UltraVISTA star-forming galaxies weighted for their SFR. This implies that, at least at z<1, LGRBs are not unbiased tracers of star formation. To make the two distributions consistent, a much steeper faint-end of the mass function would be required, or a very shallow SFR-Mass relation for the low mass galaxy population. GRB host galaxy simulations indicates that, to reproduce the stellar mass distribution, a metallicity threshold of the order of Z_th=0.3-0.5Z_sun is necessary. Models without a metallicity threshold or with an extreme threshold of Z_th = 0.1Z_sun are excluded at z<1. The use of the BAT6 complete sample makes this result not affected by possible biases which could have influenced past results based on incomplete samples. The preference for low metallicities (Z<~0.5Z_sun) can be a consequence of the particular conditions needed for the progenitor star to produce a GRB. (Abridged)
  • We study the properties of satellites in the environment of massive star-forming galaxies at z~1.8 in the COSMOS field, using a sample of 215 galaxies on the main sequence of star formation with an average mass of 10^11 Msun. At z>1.5, these galaxies typically trace halos of mass >10^13 Msun. We use optical-near-infrared photometry to estimate stellar masses and star formation rates (SFR) of centrals and satellites down to ~6*10^9 Msun. We stack data around 215 central galaxies to statistically detect their satellite halos, finding an average of ~3 galaxies in excess of the background density. We fit the radial profiles of satellites with simple beta-models, and compare their integrated properties to model predictions. We find that the total stellar mass of satellites amounts to 68% of the central galaxy, while SED modeling and far-infrared photometry consistently show their total SFR to be 25-35% of the central's rate. We also see significant variation in the specific SFR of satellites within the halo with, in particular, a sharp decrease at <100 kpc. After considering different potential explanations, we conclude that this is likely an environmental signature of the hot inner halo. This effect can be explained in the first order by a simple free-fall scenario, suggesting that these low-mass environments can shut down star formation in satellites on relatively short timescales of ~0.3 Gyr.
  • Dust-Obscured galaxies (DOGs) are bright 24 um-selected sources with extreme obscuration at optical wavelengths. They are typically characterized by a rising power-law continuum of hot dust (T_D ~ 200-1000K) in the near-IR indicating that their mid-IR luminosity is dominated by an an active galactic nucleus (AGN). DOGs with a fainter 24 um flux display a stellar bump in the near-IR and their mid-IR luminosity appears to be mainly powered by dusty star formation. Alternatively, it may be that the mid-IR emission arising from AGN activity is dominant but the torus is sufficiently opaque to make the near-IR emission from the AGN negligible with respect to the emission from the host component. In an effort to characterize the astrophysical nature of the processes responsible for the IR emission in DOGs, this paper exploits Herschel data (PACS + SPIRE) on a sample of 95 DOGs within the COSMOS field. We derive a wealth of far-IR properties (e.g., total IR luminosities; mid-to-far IR colors; dust temperatures and masses) based on SED fitting. Of particular interest are the 24 um-bright DOGs (F_24um > 1mJy). They present bluer far-IR/mid-IR colors than the rest of the sample, unveiling the potential presence of an AGN. The AGN contribution to the total 8-1000 um flux increases as a function of the rest-frame 8 um-luminosity irrespective of the redshift. This confirms that faint DOGs (L_8 um< 10^12 L_sun) are dominated by star-formation while brighter DOGs show a larger contribution from an AGN.
  • Planck Collaboration: N. Aghanim, B. Altieri, M. Arnaud, M. Ashdown, J. Aumont, C. Baccigalupi, A. J. Banday, R. B. Barreiro, N. Bartolo, E. Battaner, A. Beelen, K. Benabed, A. Benoit-Lévy, J.-P. Bernard, M. Bersanelli, M. Bethermin, P. Bielewicz, L. Bonavera, J. R. Bond, J. Borrill, F. R. Bouchet, F. Boulanger, C. Burigana, E. Calabrese, R. Canameras, J.-F. Cardoso, A. Catalano, A. Chamballu, R.-R. Chary, H. C. Chiang, P. R. Christensen, D. L. Clements, S. Colombi, F. Couchot, B. P. Crill, A. Curto, L. Danese, K. Dassas, R. D. Davies, R. J. Davis, P. de Bernardis, A. de Rosa, G. de Zotti, J. Delabrouille, J. M. Diego, H. Dole, S. Donzelli, O. Doré, M. Douspis, A. Ducout, X. Dupac, G. Efstathiou, F. Elsner, T. A. Enßlin, E. Falgarone, I. Flores-Cacho, O. Forni, M. Frailis, A. A. Fraisse, E. Franceschi, A. Frejsel, B. Frye, S. Galeotta, S. Galli, K. Ganga, M. Giard, E. Gjerløw, J. González-Nuevo, K. M. Górski, A. Gregorio, A. Gruppuso, D. Guéry, F. K. Hansen, D. Hanson, D. L. Harrison, G. Helou, C. Hernández-Monteagudo, S. R. Hildebrandt, E. Hivon, M. Hobson, W. A. Holmes, W. Hovest, K. M. Huffenberger, G. Hurier, A. H. Jaffe, T. R. Jaffe, E. Keihänen, R. Keskitalo, T. S. Kisner, R. Kneissl, J. Knoche, M. Kunz, H. Kurki-Suonio, G. Lagache, J.-M. Lamarre, A. Lasenby, M. Lattanzi, C. R. Lawrence, E. Le Floc'h, R. Leonardi, F. Levrier, M. Liguori, P. B. Lilje, M. Linden-Vørnle, M. López-Caniego, P. M. Lubin, J. F. Macías-Pérez, T. MacKenzie, B. Maffei, N. Mandolesi, M. Maris, P. G. Martin, C. Martinache, E. Martínez-González, S. Masi, S. Matarrese, P. Mazzotta, A. Melchiorri, A. Mennella, M. Migliaccio, A. Moneti, L. Montier, G. Morgante, D. Mortlock, D. Munshi, J. A. Murphy, P. Natoli, M. Negrello, N. P. H. Nesvadba, D. Novikov, I. Novikov, A. Omont, L. Pagano, F. Pajot, F. Pasian, O. Perdereau, L. Perotto, F. Perrotta, V. Pettorino, F. Piacentini, M. Piat, S. Plaszczynski, E. Pointecouteau, G. Polenta, L. Popa, G. W. Pratt, S. Prunet, J.-L. Puget, J. P. Rachen, W. T. Reach, M. Reinecke, M. Remazeilles, C. Renault, I. Ristorcelli, G. Rocha, G. Roudier, B. Rusholme, M. Sandri, D. Santos, G. Savini, D. Scott, L. D. Spencer, V. Stolyarov, R. Sunyaev, D. Sutton, J.-F. Sygnet, J. A. Tauber, L. Terenzi, L. Toffolatti, M. Tomasi, M. Tristram, M. Tucci, G. Umana, L. Valenziano, J. Valiviita, I. Valtchanov, B. Van Tent, J. D. Vieira, P. Vielva, L. A. Wade, B. D. Wandelt, I. K. Wehus, N. Welikala, A. Zacchei, A. Zonca
    April 8, 2015 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.GA
    [Abridged] We use the Planck all-sky submm and mm maps to search for rare sources distinguished by extreme brightness, a few hundreds of mJy, and their potential for being situated at high redshift. These "cold" Planck sources, selected using the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) directly from the maps and from the Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS), all satisfy the criterion of having their rest-frame far-infrared peak redshifted to the frequency range 353 and 857 GHz. This colour-selection favours galaxies in the redshift range z=2-4, which we consider as cold peaks in the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We perform a dedicated Herschel-SPIRE follow-up of 234 such Planck targets, finding a significant excess of red 350 and 500um sources, in comparison to reference SPIRE fields. About 94% of the SPIRE sources in the Planck fields are consistent with being overdensities of galaxies peaking at 350um. About 3% are candidate lensed systems, all 12 of which have secure spectroscopic confirmations, placing them at redshifts z>2.2. The galaxy overdensities are detected with high significance, half of the sample showing statistical significance above 10sigma. The SPIRE photometric redshifts of galaxies in overdensities suggest a peak at z~2. Under the Td=35K assumption, we derive an infrared (IR) luminosity for each SPIRE source of about 4x10^12 Lsun, yielding star formation rates of typically 700 Msun.yr^-1. If the observed overdensities are actual gravitationally-bound structures, the total total star formation rates reaches 7x10^3 Msun.yr^-1. Taken together, these sources show the signatures of high-z (z>$) protoclusters of intensively star-forming galaxies. All these observations confirm the uniqueness of our sample and demonstrate the ability of the all-sky Planck-HFI cold sources to select populations of cosmological and astrophysical interest for structure formation studies.
  • The relation between the stellar mass and the star formation rate characterizes how the instantaneous star formation is determined by the galaxy past star formation history and by the growth of the dark matter structures. We deconstruct the M-SFR plane by measuring the specific SFR functions in several stellar mass bins from z=0.2 out to z=1.4. Our analysis is primary based on a MIPS 24$\mu m$ selected catalogue combining the COSMOS and GOODS surveys. We estimate the SFR by combining mid- and far-infrared data for 20500 galaxies. The sSFR functions are derived in four stellar mass bins within the range 9.5<log(M/Msun)<11.5. First, we demonstrate the importance of taking into account selection effects when studying the M-SFR relation. Secondly, we find a mass-dependent evolution of the median sSFR with redshift varying as $sSFR \propto (1+z)^{b}$, with $b$ increasing from $b=2.88$ to $b=3.78$ between $M=10^{9.75}Msun$ and $M=10^{11.1}Msun$, respectively. At low masses, this evolution is consistent with the cosmological accretion rate and predictions from semi-analytical models (SAM). This agreement breaks down for more massive galaxies showing the need for a more comprehensive description of the star-formation history in massive galaxies. Third, we obtain that the shape of the sSFR function is invariant with time at z<1.4 but depends on the mass. We observe a broadening of the sSFR function ranging from 0.28 dex at $M=10^{9.75}Msun$ to 0.46 dex at $M=10^{11.1}Msun$. Such increase in the scatter of the M-SFR relation suggests an increasing diversity of SFHs as the stellar mass increases. Finally, we find a gradual decline of the sSFR with mass as $log(sSFR) \propto -0.17M$. We discuss the numerous physical processes, as gas exhaustion in hot gas halos or secular evolution, which can gradually reduce the sSFR and increase the SFH diversity.
  • Even 10 billion years ago, the cores of the first galaxy clusters are often found to host a characteristic population of massive galaxies with already suppressed star formation. Here we search for distant cluster candidates at z~2 using massive passive galaxies as tracers. With a sample of ~40 spectroscopically confirmed passive galaxies at 1.3<z<2.1, we tune photometric redshifts of several thousands passive sources in the full 2 sq.deg. COSMOS field. This allows us to map their density in redshift slices, probing the large scale structure in the COSMOS field as traced by passive sources. We report here on the three strongest passive galaxy overdensities that we identify in the redshift range 1.5<z<2.5. While the actual nature of these concentrations is still to be confirmed, we discuss their identification procedure, and the arguments supporting them as candidate galaxy clusters (likely mid-10^13 M_sun range). Although this search approach is likely biased towards more evolved structures, it has the potential to select still rare, cluster-like environments close to their epoch of first appearance, enabling new investigations of the evolution of galaxies in the context of structure growth.
  • [abridged] We use the latest release of CIGALE, a galaxy SED fitting model relying on energy balance, to study the influence of an AGN in estimating both the SFR and stellar mass in galaxies, as well as the contribution of the AGN to the power output of the host. Using the galaxy formation SAM GALFORM, we create mock galaxy SEDs using realistic star formation histories (SFH) and add an AGN of Type 1, Type 2, or intermediate type whose contribution to the bolometric luminosity can be variable. We perform an SED fitting of these catalogues with CIGALE assuming three different SFHs: a single- and double-exponentially-decreasing, and a delayed SFH. Constraining thecontribution of an AGN to the LIR (fracAGN) is very challenging for fracAGN<20%, with uncertainties of ~5-30% for higher fractions depending on the AGN type, while FIR and sub-mm are essential. The AGN power has an impact on the estimation of $M_*$ in Type 1 and intermediate type AGNs but has no effect for galaxies hosting Type 2 AGNs. We find that in the absence of AGN emission, the best estimates of $M_*$ are obtained using the double-exponentially-decreasing model but at the expense of realistic ages of the stellar population. The delayed SFH model provides good estimates of $M_*$ and SFR, with a maximum offset of 10% as well as better estimates of the age. Our analysis shows that the underestimation of the SFR increases with fracAGN for Type 1 systems, as well as for low contributions of an intermediate AGN type, but it is quite insensitive to the emission of Type 2 AGNs up to fracAGN~45%. Similarly the UV emission is critical in accurately retrieving the $M_*$ for Type 1 and intermediate type AGN, and the SFR of all of the three AGN types. We show that the presence of AGN emission introduces a scatter to the SFR-$M_*$ main sequence relation derived from SED fitting, which is driven by the uncertainties on $M_*$.
  • [Abridged] We study the evolution of the radio spectral index and far-infrared/radio correlation (FRC) across the star-formation rate-stellar masse (i.e. SFR-M*) plane up to z 2. We start from a M*-selected sample of galaxies with reliable SFR and redshift estimates. We then grid the SFR-M* plane in several redshift ranges and measure the infrared luminosity, radio luminosity, radio spectral index, and ultimately the FRC index (i.e. qFIR) of each SFR-M*-z bin. The infrared luminosities of our SFR-M*-z bins are estimated using their stacked far-infrared flux densities inferred from observations obtained with Herschel. Their radio luminosities and radio spectral indices (i.e. alpha, where Snu nu^-alpha) are estimated using their stacked 1.4GHz and 610MHz flux densities from the VLA and GMRT, respectively. Our far-infrared and radio observations include the most widely studied blank extragalactic fields -GOODS-N/S, ECDFS, and COSMOS- covering a sky area of 2deg^2. Using this methodology, we constrain the radio spectral index and FRC index of star-forming galaxies with M*>10^10Msun and 0<z<2.3. We find that alpha^1.4GHz_610MHz does not evolve significantly with redshift or with the distance of a galaxy with respect to the main sequence (MS) of the SFR-M* plane (i.e. Delta_log(SSFR)_MS=log[SSFR(galaxy)/SSFR_MS(M*,z)]). Instead, star-forming galaxies have a radio spectral index consistent with a canonical value of 0.8, which suggests that their radio spectra are dominated by non-thermal optically thin synchrotron emission. We find that qFIR displays a moderate but statistically significant redshift evolution as qFIR(z)=(2.35+/-0.08)*(1+z)^(-0.12+/-0.04), consistent with some previous literature. Finally, we find no significant correlation between qFIR and Delta_log(SSFR)_MS, though a weak positive trend, as observed in one of our redshift bins, cannot be firmly ruled out using our dataset.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a tool for studying star formation in the Universe, so it is crucial to investigate whether their host galaxies and immediate environments are in any way special compared with other star-forming galaxies. Here we present spatially resolved maps of dust emission of the host galaxy of the closest known GRB 980425 at z=0.0085 using our new high-resolution observations from Herschel, Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We modelled the spectral energy distributions of the host and of the star-forming region displaying the Wolf-Rayet signatures in the spectrum (WR region), located 800 pc from the GRB position. The host is characterised by low dust content and a high fraction of UV-visible star formation, similar to other dwarf galaxies. These galaxies are abundant in the local universe, so it is not surprising to find a GRB in one of them, assuming the correspondence between the GRB rate and star formation. The WR region contributes substantially to the host emission at the far-infrared, millimetre, and radio wavelengths and we propose that this is a consequence of its high gas density. If dense environments are also found close to the positions of other GRBs, then the ISM density should also be considered, along with metallicity, an important factor influencing whether a given stellar population can produce a GRB.
  • By exploiting the VLA-COSMOS and the Herschel-PEP surveys, we investigate the Far Infrared (FIR) properties of radio-selected AGN. To this purpose, from VLA-COSMOS we considered the 1537, F[1.4 GHz]>0.06 mJy sources with a reliable redshift estimate, and sub-divided them into star-forming galaxies and AGN solely on the basis of their radio luminosity. The AGN sample is complete with respect to radio selection at all z<~3.5. 832 radio sources have a counterpart in the PEP catalogue. 175 are AGN. Their redshift distribution closely resembles that of the total radio-selected AGN population, and exhibits two marked peaks at z~0.9 and z~2.5. We find that the probability for a radio-selected AGN to be detected at FIR wavelengths is both a function of radio power and redshift, whereby powerful sources are more likely to be FIR emitters at earlier epochs. This is due to two distinct effects: 1) at all radio luminosities, FIR activity monotonically increases with look-back time and 2) radio activity of AGN origin is increasingly less effective at inhibiting FIR emission. Radio-selected AGN with FIR emission are preferentially located in galaxies which are smaller than those hosting FIR-inactive sources. Furthermore, at all z<~2, there seems to be a preferential (stellar) mass scale M ~[10^{10}-10^{11}] Msun which maximizes the chances for FIR emission. We find such FIR (and MIR) emission to be due to processes indistinguishable from those which power star-forming galaxies. It follows that radio emission in at least 35% of the entire AGN population is the sum of two contributions: AGN accretion and star-forming processes within the host galaxy.