• We present a new {\it Chandra} observation (performed in July 2016) of the neutron-star X-ray transient IGR J17480$-$2446, located in the globular cluster Terzan 5. We study the further cooling evolution of the neutron-star crust in this system that was heated during the 2010 outburst of the source. This new observation was performed two years after the last observation of IGR J17480$-$2446, hence, significantly extending the cooling baseline. We reanalyzed all available {\it Chandra} observations of the source (but excluding observations during which one of the three known transients in Terzan 5 was in outburst) and fitted the obtained cooling curve with our cooling code {\tt NSCool}, which allows for much improved modelling than what was previously performed for the source. The data and our fit models show that the crust was still cooling $\sim$5.5 years after the end of the outburst. The neutron-star crust has likely not reached thermal equilibrium with the core yet, and further cooling is predicted (which can be confirmed with additional {\it Chandra} observations in $>$5 years time). Intriguingly, the obtained thermal conductivity in the neutron-drip layer in the crust is relatively low compared to what has been inferred for other crust-cooling sources. The reason for this difference is unclear but it might be related to the fact that IGR J17480$-$2446 harbours a relatively slow rotating neutron star (with a spin of 11 Hz) that has a relatively large inferred surface magnetic field strength ($10^{9-10}$ Gauss) compared to what is known or typically assumed for other cooling sources.
  • We present Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) observations of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 during the early mission phase in 2017. With the high spectral sensitivity and low-energy X-ray passband of NICER, we are able to detect the Fe L line complex in addition to the signature broad, asymmetric Fe K line. We confirm the presence of these lines by comparing the NICER data to archival observations with XMM-Newton/RGS and NuSTAR. Both features originate close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). When modeling the lines with the relativistic line model RELLINE, we find the Fe L blend requires an inner disk radius of $1.4_{-0.1}^{+0.2}$ $R_{\mathrm{ISCO}}$ and Fe K is at $1.03_{-0.03}^{+0.13}$ $R_{\mathrm{ISCO}}$ (errors quoted at 90%). This corresponds to a position of $17.3_{-1.2}^{+2.5}$ km and $12.7_{-0.4}^{+1.6}$ km for a canonical neutron star mass ($M_{\mathrm{NS}}=1.4\ M_{\odot}$) and dimensionless spin value of $a=0$. Additionally, we employ a new version of the RELXILL model tailored for neutron stars and determine that these features arise from a dense disk and supersolar Fe abundance.
  • We present a detailed X-ray timing analysis of the highly variable NLS1 galaxy, IRAS 13224-3809. The source was recently monitored for 1.5 Ms with XMM-Newton which, combined with 500 ks archival data, makes this the best studied NLS1 galaxy in X-rays to date. We apply a full suite of timing methods in both the time- and Fourier-domain in order to understand the underlying variability process. The source flux is not distributed lognormally, as would be expected for accreting sources. The first non-linear rms-flux relation for any accreting source in any waveband is found, with $\mathrm{rms} \propto \mathrm{flux}^{2/3}$. The light curves exhibit strong non-stationarity, in addition to that caused by the rms-flux relation, and are fractionally more variable at lower source flux. The power spectrum is estimated down to $\sim 10^{-7}$ Hz and consists of multiple peaked components: a low-frequency break at $\sim 10^{-5}$ Hz, with slope $\alpha < 1$ down to low frequencies; an additional component breaking at $\sim 10^{-3}$ Hz. Using the high-frequency break we estimate the black hole mass $M_\mathrm{BH} = [0.5-2] \times 10^{6} M_{\odot}$, and mass accretion rate in Eddington units, $\dot m_{\rm Edd} \gtrsim 1$. The non-stationarity is manifest in the PSD with the low-frequency break moving to higher frequencies with decreasing source flux. We also detect a narrow coherent feature in the soft band PSD at $0.7$ mHz, modelled with a Lorentzian the feature has $Q \sim 8$ and an $\mathrm{rms} \sim 3$ %. We discuss the implication of these results for accretion of matter onto black holes.
  • We present a detailed spectral analysis of the recent 1.5\,Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS~13224$-$3809, taken simultaneously with 500\,ks of NuSTAR data. The X-ray lightcurve shows three flux peaks, registering at about 100 times the minimum flux seen during the campaign, and rapid variability with a time scale of kiloseconds. The spectra are well fit with a primary powerlaw continuum, two relativistic-blurred reflection components from the inner accretion disk with very high iron abundance, and a simple blackbody-shaped model for the remaining soft excess. The spectral variability is dominated by the power law continuum from a corona region within a few gravitational radii from the black hole. Additionally, blueshifted Ne \textsc{x}, Mg \textsc{xii}, Si \textsc{xiv} and S \textsc{xvi} absorption lines are identified in the stacked low-flux spectrum, confirming the presence of a highly ionized outflow with velocity up to $v= 0.267$ and $0.225$\,c. We fit the absorption features with \texttt{xstar} models and find a relatively constant velocity outflow through the whole observation. Finally, we replace the \texttt{bbody} and supersolar abundance reflection models by fitting the soft excess successfully with the extended reflection model \texttt{relxillD}, which allows for higher densities than the standard \texttt{relxill} model. This returns a disk electron density $n_{\rm e}>10^{18.7}$\,cm$^{-3}$ and lowers the iron abundance from $Z_{\rm Fe}=24^{+3}_{-4}Z_\odot$ with $n_{\rm e}\equiv10^{15}$\,cm$^{-3}$ to $Z_{\rm Fe}=6.6^{+0.8}_{-2.1}Z_\odot$.
  • We present results from the optical, ultraviolet and X-ray monitoring of the NLS1 galaxy IRAS 13224-3809 taken with Swift and XMM-Newton during 2016. IRAS 13224-3809 is the most variable bright AGN in the X-ray sky and shows strong X-ray reflection, implying that the X-rays strongly illuminate the inner disc. Therefore, it is a good candidate to study the relationship between coronal X-ray and disc UV emission. However, we find no correlation between the X-ray and UV flux over the available ~40 day monitoring, despite the presence of strong X-ray variability and the variable part of the UV spectrum being consistent with irradiation of a standard thin disc. This means either that the X-ray flux which irradiates the UV emitting outer disc does not correlate with the X-ray flux in our line of sight and/or that another process drives the majority of the UV variability. The former case may be due to changes in coronal geometry, absorption or scattering between the corona and the disc.
  • The transient neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary MAXI J0556$-$332 provides a rare opportunity to study NS crust heating and subsequent cooling for multiple outbursts of the same source. We examine {\it MAXI}, {\it Swift}, {\it Chandra}, and {\it XMM-Newton} data of MAXI J0556$-$332 obtained during and after three accretion outbursts of different durations and brightness. We report on new data obtained after outburst III. The source has been tracked up to $\sim$1800 d after the end of outburst I. Outburst I heated the crust strongly, but no significant reheating was observed during outburst II. Cooling from $\sim$333 eV to $\sim$146 eV was observed during the first $\sim$1200 d. Outburst III reheated the crust up to $\sim$167 eV, after which the crust cooled again to $\sim$131 eV in $\sim$350 d. We model the thermal evolution of the crust and find that this source required a different strength and depth of shallow heating during each of the three outbursts. The shallow heating released during outburst I was $\sim$17 MeV nucleon$^{-1}$ and outburst III required $\sim$0.3 MeV nucleon$^{-1}$. These cooling observations could not be explained without shallow heating. The shallow heating for outburst II was not well constrained and could vary from $\sim$0--2.2 MeV nucleon$^{-1}$, i.e., this outburst could in principle be explained without invoking shallow heating. We discuss the nature of the shallow heating and why it may occur at different strengths and depths during different outbursts.
  • X-ray reverberation lags from the vicinity of supermassive black holes have been detected in almost 30 AGN. The soft lag, which is the time delay between the hard and soft X-ray light curves, is usually interpreted as the time difference between the direct and reflected emission, but is alternatively suggested to arise from the direct and scattering emission from distant clouds. By analysing the archival Suzaku observations totalling an exposure time of ~ 770 ks, we discover a soft lag of $10\pm3.4$ ks at $9.58\times10^{-6}$ Hz in the luminous quasar PDS 456, which is the longest soft lag and lowest Fourier frequency reported to date. In this study, we use the maximum likelihood method to deal with non-continuous nature of the Suzaku light curves. The result follows the mass-scaling relation for soft lags, which further supports that soft lags originate from the innermost areas of AGN and hence are best interpreted by the reflection scenario. Spectral analysis has been performed in this work and we find no evidence of clumpy partial-covering absorbers. The spectrum can be explained by a self-consistent relativistic reflection model with warm absorbers, and spectral variations over epochs can be accounted for by the change of the continuum, and of column density and ionization states of the warm absorbers.
  • L. Pei, M. M. Fausnaugh, A. J. Barth, B. M. Peterson, M. C. Bentz, G. De Rosa, K. D. Denney, M. R. Goad, C. S. Kochanek, K. T. Korista, G. A. Kriss, R. W. Pogge, V. N. Bennert, M. Brotherton, K. I. Clubb, E. Dalla Bontà, A. V. Filippenko, J. E. Greene, C. J. Grier, M. Vestergaard, W. Zheng, Scott M. Adams, Thomas G. Beatty, A. Bigley, Jacob E. Brown, Jonathan S. Brown, G. Canalizo, J. M. Comerford, Carl T. Coker, E. M. Corsini, S. Croft, K. V. Croxall, A. J. Deason, Michael Eracleous, O. D. Fox, E. L. Gates, C. B. Henderson, E. Holmbeck, T. W.-S. Holoien, J. J. Jensen, C. A. Johnson, P. L. Kelly, S. Kim, A. King, M. W. Lau, Miao Li, Cassandra Lochhaas, Zhiyuan Ma, E. R. Manne-Nicholas, J. C. Mauerhan, M. A. Malkan, R. McGurk, L. Morelli, Ana Mosquera, Dale Mudd, F. Muller Sanchez, M. L. Nguyen, P. Ochner, B. Ou-Yang, A. Pancoast, Matthew T. Penny, A. Pizzella, Radosław Poleski, Jessie Runnoe, B. Scott, Jaderson S. Schimoia, B. J. Shappee, I. Shivvers, Gregory V. Simonian, A. Siviero, Garrett Somers, Daniel J. Stevens, M. A. Strauss, Jamie Tayar, N. Tejos, T. Treu, J. Van Saders, L. Vican, S. Villanueva Jr., H. Yuk, N. L. Zakamska, W. Zhu, M. D. Anderson, P. Arévalo, C. Bazhaw, S. Bisogni, G. A. Borman, M. C. Bottorff, W. N. Brandt, A. A. Breeveld, E. M. Cackett, M. T. Carini, D. M. Crenshaw, A. De Lorenzo-Cáceres, M. Dietrich, R. Edelson, N. V. Efimova, J. Ely, P. A. Evans, G. J. Ferland, K. Flatland, N. Gehrels, S. Geier, J. M. Gelbord, D. Grupe, A. Gupta, P. B. Hall, S. Hicks, D. Horenstein, Keith Horne, T. Hutchison, M. Im, M. D. Joner, J. Jones, J. Kaastra, S. Kaspi, B. C. Kelly, J. A. Kennea, M. Kim, S. C. Kim, S. A. Klimanov, J. C. Lee, D. C. Leonard, P. Lira, F. MacInnis, S. Mathur, I. M. McHardy, C. Montouri, R. Musso, S. V. Nazarov, H. Netzer, R. P. Norris, J. A. Nousek, D. N. Okhmat, I. Papadakis, J. R. Parks, J.-U. Pott, S. E. Rafter, H.-W. Rix, D. A. Saylor, K. Schnülle, S. G. Sergeev, M. Siegel, A. Skielboe, M. Spencer, D. Starkey, H.-I. Sung, K. G. Teems, C. S. Turner, P. Uttley, C. Villforth, Y. Weiss, J.-H. Woo, H. Yan, S. Young, Y. Zu
    Feb. 3, 2017 astro-ph.GA
    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic monitoring program targeting NGC 5548 as part of a larger multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The campaign spanned six months and achieved an almost daily cadence with observations from five ground-based telescopes. The H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 broad emission-line light curves lag that of the 5100 $\AA$ optical continuum by $4.17^{+0.36}_{-0.36}$ days and $0.79^{+0.35}_{-0.34}$ days, respectively. The H$\beta$ lag relative to the 1158 $\AA$ ultraviolet continuum light curve measured by the Hubble Space Telescope is roughly $\sim$50% longer than that measured against the optical continuum, and the lag difference is consistent with the observed lag between the optical and ultraviolet continua. This suggests that the characteristic radius of the broad-line region is $\sim$50% larger than the value inferred from optical data alone. We also measured velocity-resolved emission-line lags for H$\beta$ and found a complex velocity-lag structure with shorter lags in the line wings, indicative of a broad-line region dominated by Keplerian motion. The responses of both the H$\beta$ and He II $\lambda$4686 emission lines to the driving continuum changed significantly halfway through the campaign, a phenomenon also observed for C IV, Ly $\alpha$, He II(+O III]), and Si IV(+O IV]) during the same monitoring period. Finally, given the optical luminosity of NGC 5548 during our campaign, the measured H$\beta$ lag is a factor of five shorter than the expected value implied by the $R_\mathrm{BLR} - L_\mathrm{AGN}$ relation based on the past behavior of NGC 5548.
  • We present $\emph{NuSTAR}$ observations of neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binaries: 4U 1636-53, GX 17+2, and 4U 1705-44. We observed 4U 1636-53 in the hard state, with an Eddington fraction, $F_{\mathrm{Edd}}$, of 0.01; GX 17+2 and 4U 1705-44 were in the soft state with fractions of 0.57 and 0.10, respectively. Each spectrum shows evidence for a relativistically broadened Fe K$_{\alpha}$ line. Through accretion disk reflection modeling, we constrain the radius of the inner disk in 4U 1636-53 to be $R_{in}=1.03\pm0.03$ ISCO (innermost stable circular orbit) assuming a dimensionless spin parameter $a_{*}=cJ/GM^{2}=0.0$, and $R_{in}=1.08\pm0.06$ ISCO for $a_{*}=0.3$ (errors quoted at 1 $\sigma$). This value proves to be model independent. For $a_{*}=0.3$ and $M=1.4\ M_{\odot}$, for example, $1.08\pm0.06$ ISCO translates to a physical radius of $R=10.8\pm0.6$ km, and the neutron star would have to be smaller than this radius (other outcomes are possible for allowed spin parameters and masses). For GX 17+2, $R_{in}=1.00-1.04$ ISCO for $a_{*}=0.0$ and $R_{in}=1.03-1.30$ ISCO for $a_{*}=0.3$. For $a_{*}=0.3$ and $M=1.4\ M_{\odot}$, $R_{in}=1.03-1.30$ ISCO translates to $R=10.3-13.0$ km. The inner accretion disk in 4U 1705-44 may be truncated just above the stellar surface, perhaps by a boundary layer or magnetosphere; reflection models give a radius of 1.46-1.64 ISCO for $a_{*}=0.0$ and 1.69-1.93 ISCO for $a_{*}=0.3$. We discuss the implications that our results may have on the equation of state of ultradense, cold matter and our understanding of the innermost accretion flow onto neutron stars with low surface magnetic fields, and systematic errors related to the reflection models and spacetime metric around less idealized neutron stars.
  • We conduct a multiwavelength continuum variability study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 to investigate the temperature structure of its accretion disk. The 19 overlapping continuum light curves (1158 to 9157 angstroms) combine simultaneous HST , Swift , and ground-based observations over a 180 day period from 2014 January to July. Light-curve variability is interpreted as the reverberation response of the accretion disk to irradiation by a central time-varying point source. Our model yields the disk inclination, i, temperature T1 at 1 light day from the black hole, and a temperature-radius slope, alpha. We also infer the driving light curve and find that it correlates poorly with both the hard and soft X-ray light curves, suggesting that the X-rays alone may not drive the ultraviolet and optical variability over the observing period. We also decompose the light curves into bright, faint, and mean accretion-disk spectra. These spectra lie below that expected for a standard blackbody accretion disk accreting at L/LEdd = 0.1
  • X-ray reverberation, where light-travel time delays map out the compact geometry around the inner accretion flow in supermassive black holes, has been discovered in several of the brightest, most variable and well-known Seyfert galaxies. In this work, we expand the study of X-ray reverberation to all Seyfert galaxies in the XMM-Newton archive above a nominal rms variability and exposure level (a total of 43 sources). 50 per cent of source exhibit iron K reverberation, in that the broad iron K emission line responds to rapid variability in the continuum. We also find that on long timescales, the hard band emission lags behind the soft band emission in 85 per cent of sources. This `low-frequency hard lag' is likely associated with the coronal emission, and so this result suggests that most sources with X-ray variability show intrinsic variability from the nuclear region. We update the known iron K lag amplitude vs. black hole mass relation, and find evidence that the height or extent of the coronal source (as inferred by the reverberation time delay) increases with mass accretion rate.
  • We report on observations of the neutron star (NS) residing in the low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-34205 taken 2015 March by $\emph{NuSTAR}$ and $\emph{XMM-Newton}$ while the source was in the hard spectral state. We find multiple reflection features (Fe K$_{\alpha}$ detected with $\emph{NuSTAR}$; N VII, O VII, and O VIII detected in the RGS) from different ionization zones. Through joint fits using the self consistent relativistic reflection model {\sc relxill}, we determine the inner radius to be $\leq 11.1\ R_{g}$. For a 1.4 M$_{\odot}$ NS with a spin of $a_{*}=0$, this is an inner disk radius of $\leq22.2$ km. We find the inclination of the system to be between $18^{\circ}$-$29^{\circ}$. If the disk is truncated at a radius greater than the neutron star radius, it could be truncated by a boundary layer on the neutron star surface. It is also possible that the disk is truncated at the magnetospheric radius; conservative estimates would then imply $B\leq(0.3 -1.0)\times10^{9}$ G at the magnetic poles, though coherent pulsations have not been detected and the source is not identified as a pulsar.
  • We present ground-based optical photometric monitoring data for NGC 5548, part of an extended multi-wavelength reverberation mapping campaign. The light curves have nearly daily cadence from 2014 January to July in nine filters (\emph{BVRI} and \emph{ugriz}). Combined with ultraviolet data from the \emph{Hubble Space Telescope} and \emph{Swift}, we confirm significant time delays between the continuum bands as a function of wavelength, extending the wavelength coverage from 1158\,\AA\ to the $z$ band ($\sim\!9160$\,\AA). We find that the lags at wavelengths longer than the {\it V} band are equal to or greater than the lags of high-ionization-state emission lines (such as He\,{\sc ii}\,$\lambda 1640$ and $\lambda 4686$), suggesting that the continuum-emitting source is of a physical size comparable to the inner broad-line region (BLR). The trend of lag with wavelength is broadly consistent with the prediction for continuum reprocessing by an accretion disk with $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$. However, the lags also imply a disk radius that is 3 times larger than the prediction from standard thin-disk theory, assuming that the bolometric luminosity is 10\% of the Eddington luminosity ($L = 0.1L_{\rm Edd}$). Using optical spectra from the Large Binocular Telescope, we estimate the bias of the interband continuum lags due to BLR emission observed in the filters. We find that the bias for filters with high levels of BLR contamination ($\sim\! 20\%$) can be important for the shortest continuum lags, and likely has a significant impact on the {\it u} and {\it U} bands owing to Balmer continuum emission.
  • Reverberation-mapping-based scaling relations are often used to estimate the masses of black holes from single-epoch spectra of AGN. While the radius-luminosity relation that is the basis of these scaling relations is determined using reverberation mapping of the H$\beta$ line in nearby AGN, the scaling relations are often extended to use other broad emission lines, such as MgII, in order to get black hole masses at higher redshifts when H$\beta$ is redshifted out of the optical waveband. However, there is no radius-luminosity relation determined directly from MgII. Here, we present an attempt to perform reverberation mapping using MgII in the well-studied nearby Seyfert 1, NGC 5548. We used Swift to obtain UV grism spectra of NGC 5548 once every two days from April to September 2013. Concurrent photometric UV monitoring with Swift provides a well determined continuum lightcurve that shows strong variability. The MgII emission line, however, is not strongly correlated with the continuum variability, and there is no significant lag between the two. We discuss these results in the context of using MgII scaling relations to estimate high-redshift black hole masses.
  • We systematically reanalyze two previous observations of the black hole (BH) GX 339-4 in the very high and intermediate state taken with $\emph{XMM-Newton}$ and $\emph{Suzaku}$. We utilize up-to-date data reduction procedures and implement the recently developed, self-consistent model for X-ray reflection and relativistic ray tracing, {\sc relxill}. In the very high and intermediate state, the rate of accretion is high and thus the disk remains close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). We require a common spin parameter and inclination when fitting the two observations since these parameters should remain constant across all states. This allows for the most accurate determination of the spin parameter of this galactic black hole binary from fitting the Fe K$\alpha$ emission line and provides a chance to test previous estimates. We find GX 339-4 to be consistent with a near maximally spinning black hole with a spin parameter $a_{*}$ $>0.97$ with an inclination of $36 \pm 4$ degrees. This spin value is consistent with previous high estimates for this object. Further, if the inner disk is aligned with the binary inclination, this modest inclination returns a high black hole mass, but they need not be aligned. Additionally, we explore how the spin is correlated with the power of the jet emitted but find no correlation between the two.
  • The quiescent spectrum of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries typically consists of two components - a thermal component associated with emission from the neutron star surface, and a non-thermal power-law component whose origin is not well understood. Spectral fitting of neutron star atmosphere models to the thermal component is one of the leading methods for measuring the neutron star radius. However, it has been known for years that the X-ray spectra of quiescent neutron stars vary between observations. While most quiescent variability is explained through a variable power-law component, the brightest and best-studied object, Cen X-4, requires a change in the thermal component and such thermal variability could be a problem for measuring neutron star radii. In this paper, we significantly increase the number of sources whose quiescent spectra have been studied for variability. We examine 9 potential quiescent neutron stars with luminosities <1E34 erg/s over the course of multiple Chandra observations of the globular clusters NGC 6440 and Terzan 5 and find no strong evidence for variability in the effective temperature in 7 of the 9 sources. Two sources show a potential change in temperature, though this depends on the exact model fitted. CX1 in NGC 6440 is equally well fit by a variable thermal component or a variable power law. Therefore, the results are inconclusive and we cannot exclude or require thermal variability in that source. CX5 in NGC 6440 shows a potential change in temperature, though this depends on whether a power-law is included in the spectral fit or not. This suggests that thermal variability may not be widespread among quiescent neutron stars with luminosities < 1E34 erg/s, and hence thermal radiation remains a promising means to constraining neutron star radii.
  • We study the X-ray properties of a sample of 14 optically-selected low-mass AGN whose masses lie within the range 1E5 -2E6 M(solar) with XMM-Newton. Only six of these low-mass AGN have previously been studied with sufficient quality X-ray data, thus, we more than double the number of low-mass AGN observed by XMM-Newton with the addition of our sample. We analyze their X-ray spectral properties and variability and compare the results to their more massive counterparts. The presence of a soft X-ray excess is detectable in all five objects which were not background dominated at 2-3 keV. Combined with previous studies, this gives a total of 8 low-mass AGN with a soft excess. The low-mass AGN exhibit rapid, short-term variability (hundreds to thousands of seconds) as well as long-term variability (months to years). There is a well-known anti-correlation between black hole mass and variability amplitude (normalized excess variance). Comparing our sample of low-mass AGN with this relation we find that all of our sample lie below an extrapolation of the linear relation. Such a flattening of the relation at low masses (below about 1E6 M(solar)) is expected if the variability in all AGN follows the same shape power spectrum with a break frequency that is dependent on mass. Finally, we also found two objects that show significant absorption in their X-ray spectrum, indicative of type 2 objects, although they are classified as type 1 AGN based on optical spectra.
  • MCG-6-30-15 is one of the most observed Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies in the X-ray band. In this paper we examine the X-ray time lags in this source using a total of 600 ks in observations (440 ks exposure) taken with the XMM-Newton telescope (300 ks in 2001 and 300 ks in 2013). Both the old and new observations show the usual hard lag that increases with energy, however, the hard lag turns over to a soft lag at frequencies below ~1e-4 Hz. The highest frequencies (~1e-3 Hz) in this source show a clear soft lag, as previously presented for the first 300 ks observation, but no clear iron K lag is detected in either the old or new observation. The soft lag is more significant in the old observation than the new. The observations are consistent with a reverberation interpretation, where the soft, reflected emission is delayed with respect to the hard powerlaw component. These spectral timing results suggest that two distinct variability mechanisms are important in this source: intrinsic coronal variations (which lead to correlated variability in the reprocessed emission), and geometrical changes in the corona. Variability due to geometrical changes does not result in correlated variability in the reflection, and therefore inhibits the clear detection of an iron K lag.
  • Luminous accreting stellar mass and supermassive black holes produce power-law continuum X-ray emission from a compact central corona. Reverberation time lags occur due to light travel time-delays between changes in the direct coronal emission and corresponding variations in its reflection from the accretion flow. Reverberation is detectable using light curves made in different X-ray energy bands, since the direct and reflected components have different spectral shapes. Larger, lower frequency, lags are also seen and are identified with propagation of fluctuations through the accretion flow and associated corona. We review the evidence for X-ray reverberation in active galactic nuclei and black hole X-ray binaries, showing how it can be best measured and how it may be modelled. The timescales and energy-dependence of the high frequency reverberation lags show that much of the signal is originating from very close to the black hole in some objects, within a few gravitational radii of the event horizon. We consider how these signals can be studied in the future to carry out X-ray reverberation mapping of the regions closest to black holes.
  • MCG-5-23-16 is one of the first AGN where relativistic reverberation in the iron K line originating in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole was found, based on a short XMM-Newton observation. In this work, we present the results from long X-ray observations using Suzaku, XMM-Newton and NuSTAR designed to map the emission region using X-ray reverberation. A relativistic iron line is detected in the lag spectra on three different time-scales, allowing the emission from different regions around the black hole to be separated. Using NuSTAR coverage of energies above 10 keV reveals a lag between these energies and the primary continuum, which is detected for the first time in an AGN. This lag is a result of the Compton reflection hump responding to changes in the primary source in a manner similar to the response of the relativistic iron K line.
  • The recent detection of X-ray reverberation lags, especially in the Fe K\alpha\ line region, around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) has opened up the possibility of studying the time-resolved response (reflection) of hard X-rays from the accretion disk around supermassive black holes. Here, we use general relativistic transfer functions for reflection of X-rays from a point source located at some height above the black hole to study the time lags expected as a function of frequency and energy in the Fe K\alpha\ line region. We explore the models and the dependence of the lags on key parameters such as the height of the X-ray source, accretion disk inclination, black hole spin and black hole mass. We then compare these models with the observed frequency and energy dependence of the Fe K\alpha\ line lag in NGC 4151. Assuming the optical reverberation mapping mass of $4.6\times10^7~M_\odot$ we get a best fit to the lag profile across the Fe K\alpha\ line in the frequency range $(1-2)\times10^{-5}$ Hz for an X-ray source located at a height $h = 7^{+2.9}_{-2.6}~R_G$ with a maximally spinning black hole and an inclination $i < 30^\circ$.
  • High-frequency iron K reverberation lags, where the red wing of the line responds before the line centroid, are a robust signature of relativistic reflection off the inner accretion disc. In this letter, we report the discovery of the Fe K lag in PG 1244+026 from ~120 ks of data (1 orbit of the XMM-Newton telescope). The amplitude of the lag with respect to the continuum is 1000 s at a frequency of ~1e-4 Hz. We also find a possible frequency-dependence of the line: as we probe higher frequencies (i.e. shorter timescales from a smaller emitting region) the Fe K lag peaks at the red wing of the line, while at lower frequencies (from a larger emitting region) we see the dominant reflection lag from the rest frame line centroid. The mean energy spectrum shows a strong soft excess, though interestingly, there is no indication of a soft lag. Given that this source has radio emission and it has little reported correlated variability between the soft excess and the hard band, we explore one possible explanation in which the soft excess in this source is dominated by the steep power-law like emission from a jet, and that a corona (or base of the jet) irradiates the inner accretion disc, creating the blurred reflection features evident in the spectrum and the lag. General Relativistic ray-tracing models fit the Fe K lag well, with the best-fit giving a compact X-ray source at a height of 5 gravitational radii and a black hole mass of 1.3e7 Msun.
  • We present an X-ray spectral and temporal analysis of the variable active galaxy NGC 6814, observed with Suzaku during November 2011. Remarkably, the X-ray spectrum shows no evidence for the soft excess commonly observed amongst other active galaxies, despite its relatively low level of obscuration, and is dominated across the whole Suzaku bandpass by the intrinsic powerlaw-like continuum. Despite this, we clearly detect the presence of a low frequency hard lag of ~1600s between the 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands at greater than 6-sigma significance, similar to those reported in the literature for a variety of other AGN. At these energies, any additional emission from e.g. a very weak, undetected soft excess, or from distant reflection must contribute less than 3% of the observed countrates (at 90% confidence). Given the lack of any significant continuum emission component other than the powerlaw, we can rule out models that invoke distant reprocessing for the observed lag behavior, which must instead be associated with this continuum emission. These results are fully consistent with a propagating fluctuation origin for the low frequency hard lags, and with the interpretation of the high frequency soft lags - a common feature seen in the highest quality AGN data with strong soft excesses - as reverberation from the inner accretion disk.
  • The quasi-persistent neutron star low-mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29 went into quiescence in 2001, and we have followed its quiescent X-ray evolution since. Observations over the first 4 years showed a rapid drop in flux and temperature of the neutron star atmosphere, interpreted as cooling of the neutron star crust which had been heated during the 2.5 year outburst. However, observations taken approximately 1400 and 2400 days into quiescence were consistent with each other, suggesting the crust had reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Here we present a new Chandra observation of MXB 1659-29 taken 11 years into quiescence and 4 years since the last Chandra observation. This new observation shows an unexpected factor of ~3 drop in count rate and change in spectral shape since the last observation, which cannot be explained simply by continued cooling. Two possible scenarios are that either the neutron star temperature has remained unchanged and there has been an increase in the column density, or, alternatively the neutron star temperature has dropped precipitously and the spectrum is now dominated by a power-law component. The first scenario may be possible given that MXB 1659-29 is a near edge-on system, and an increase in column density could be due to build-up of material in, and a thickening of, a truncated accretion disk during quiescence. But, a large change in disk height may not be plausible if standard accretion disk theory holds during quiescence. Alternatively, the disk may be precessing, leading to a higher column density during this latest observation.
  • We use archival XMM-Newton observations of Ark 564 and Mrk 335 to calculate the frequency dependent time-lags for these two well-studied sources. We discover high-frequency Fe K lags in both sources, indicating that the red wing of the line precedes the rest frame energy by roughly 100 s and 150 s for Ark 564 and Mrk 335, respectively. Including these two new sources, Fe K reverberation lags have been observed in seven Seyfert galaxies. We examine the low-frequency lag-energy spectrum, which is smooth, and shows no feature of reverberation, as would be expected if the low-frequency lags were produced by distant reflection off circumnuclear material. The clear differences in the low and high frequency lag-energy spectra indicate that the lags are produced by two distinct physical processes. Finally, we find that the amplitude of the Fe K lag scales with black hole mass for these seven sources, consistent with a relativistic reflection model where the lag is the light travel delay associated with reflection of continuum photons off the inner disc.