• We present a deep, low-frequency radio continuum study of the nearby Fanaroff--Riley class I (FR I) radio galaxy 3C 31 using a combination of LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR; 30--85 and 115--178 MHz), Very Large Array (VLA; 290--420 MHz), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT; 609 MHz) and Giant Metre Radio Telescope (GMRT; 615 MHz) observations. Our new LOFAR 145-MHz map shows that 3C 31 has a largest physical size of $1.1$ Mpc in projection, which means 3C 31 now falls in the class of giant radio galaxies. We model the radio continuum intensities with advective cosmic-ray transport, evolving the cosmic-ray electron population and magnetic field strength in the tails as functions of distance to the nucleus. We find that if there is no in-situ particle acceleration in the tails, then decelerating flows are required that depend on radius $r$ as $v\propto r^{\beta}$ ($\beta\approx -1$). This then compensates for the strong adiabatic losses due to the lateral expansion of the tails. We are able to find self-consistent solutions in agreement with the entrainment model of Croston & Hardcastle, where the magnetic field provides $\approx$$1/3$ of the pressure needed for equilibrium with the surrounding intra-cluster medium (ICM). We obtain an advective time-scale of $\approx$$190$ Myr, which, if equated to the source age, would require an average expansion Mach number ${\cal M} \approx 5$ over the source lifetime. Dynamical arguments suggest that instead, either the outer tail material does not represent the oldest jet plasma or else the particle ages are underestimated due to the effects of particle acceleration on large scales.
  • We present a multi-wavelength analysis of star-forming galaxies in the massive cluster MS0451.6-0305 at z $\sim$ 0.54 to shed new light on the evolution of the far-infrared-radio relationship in distant rich clusters. We have derived total infrared luminosities for a spectroscopically confirmed sample of cluster and field galaxies through an empirical relation based on $Spitzer$ MIPS 24 $\mu$m photometry. The radio flux densities were measured from deep Very Large Array 1.4 GHz radio continuum observations. We find the ratio of far-infrared to radio luminosity for galaxies in an intermediate redshift cluster to be $q_{\rm FIR}$ = 1.80$\pm$0.15 with a dispersion of 0.53. Due to the large intrinsic dispersion, we do not find any observable change in this value with either redshift or environment. However, a higher percentage of galaxies in this cluster show an excess in their radio fluxes when compared to low redshift clusters ($27^{+23}_{-13}\%$ to $11\%$), suggestive of a cluster enhancement of radio-excess sources at this earlier epoch. In addition, the far-infrared-radio relationship for blue galaxies, where $q_{\rm FIR}$ = 2.01$\pm$0.14 with a dispersion of 0.35, is consistent with the predicted value from the field relationship, although these results are based on a sample from a single cluster.
  • We investigate the process of rapid star formation quenching in a sample of 12 massive galaxies at intermediate redshift (z~0.6) that host high-velocity ionized gas outflows (v>1000 km/s). We conclude that these fast outflows are most likely driven by feedback from star formation rather than active galactic nuclei (AGN). We use multiwavelength survey and targeted observations of the galaxies to assess their star formation, AGN activity, and morphology. Common attributes include diffuse tidal features indicative of recent mergers accompanied by bright, unresolved cores with effective radii less than a few hundred parsecs. The galaxies are extraordinarily compact for their stellar mass, even when compared with galaxies at z~2-3. For 9/12 galaxies, we rule out an AGN contribution to the nuclear light and hypothesize that the unresolved core comes from a compact central starburst triggered by the dissipative collapse of very gas-rich progenitor merging disks. We find evidence of AGN activity in half the sample but we argue that it accounts for only a small fraction (<10%) of the total bolometric luminosity. We find no correlation between AGN activity and outflow velocity and we conclude that the fast outflows in our galaxies are not powered by on-going AGN activity, but rather by recent, extremely compact starbursts.
  • We present near infra-red light curves of supernova (SN) 2011fe in M101, including 34 epochs in H band starting fourteen days before maximum brightness in the B-band. The light curve data were obtained with the WIYN High-Resolution Infrared Camera (WHIRC). When the data are calibrated using templates of other Type Ia SNe, we derive an apparent H-band magnitude at the epoch of B-band maximum of 10.85 \pm 0.04. This implies a distance modulus for M101 that ranges from 28.86 to 29.17 mag, depending on which absolute calibration for Type Ia SNe is used.
  • Deep Chandra exposures reveal the presence of diffuse X-ray emission with a luminosity of 1.3x10^{39} ergs s^{-1} from the spiral galaxy NGC 3184. This appears to be truly diffuse thermal emission distinct from the low-luminosity LMXB emission. While the unresolved emission from older LMXBs is more uniformly distributed across the galaxy, the diffuse X-ray emission is concentrated in areas of younger stellar populations and star forming regions. The surface brightness of the diffuse emission over the spiral arms is five times greater than in off-arm regions, and eight times brighter in H II regions than in non-H II regions. Spectral fits to the diffuse thermal emission are consistent with a low temperature component, T ~ 1.5 x 10^6 K, plus a higher temperature component, T ~ 5 x 10^6 K.
  • We present H-alpha velocity fields for a sample of nearly face--on spiral galaxies observed with DensePak on the WIYN telescope. We combine kinematic inclinations and position angles measured from these data with photometric inclinations and position angles measured from I-band images to show that spiral disks are intrinsically non-circular.