• The paper surveys open problems and questions related to different aspects of integrable systems with finitely many degrees of freedom. Many of the open problems were suggested by the participants of the conference "Finite-dimensional Integrable Systems, FDIS 2017" held at CRM, Barcelona in July 2017.
  • We study the low-energy physics of a broad class of time-reversal invariant and SU(2)-symmetric one-dimensional spin-S systems in the presence of quenched disorder via a strong-disorder renormalization-group technique. We show that, in general, there is an antiferromagnetic phase with an emergent SU(2S+1) symmetry. The ground state of this phase is a random singlet state in which the singlets are formed by pairs of spins. For integer spins, there is an additional antiferromagnetic phase which does not exhibit any emergent symmetry (except for S=1). The corresponding ground state is a random singlet one but the singlets are formed mostly by trios of spins. In each case the corresponding low-energy dynamics is activated, i.e., with a formally infinite dynamical exponent, and related to distinct infinite-randomness fixed points. The phase diagram has two other phases with ferromagnetic tendencies: a disordered ferromagnetic phase and a large spin phase in which the effective disorder is asymptotically finite. In the latter case, the dynamical scaling is governed by a conventional power law with a finite dynamical exponent.
  • Strongly correlated materials with strong spin-orbit coupling hold promise for realizing topological phases with fractionalized excitations. Here we propose a chiral spin-orbital liquid as a stable phase of a realistic model for heavy-element double perovskites. This spin liquid state has Majorana fermion excitations with a gapless spectrum characterized by nodal lines along the edges of the Brillouin zone. We show that the nodal lines are topological defects of a non-Abelian Berry connection and that the system exhibits dispersing surface states. We discuss some experimental signatures of this state and compare them with properties of the spin liquid candidate Ba_2YMoO_6.
  • We address the question of why strongly correlated d-wave superconductors, such as the cuprates, prove to be surprisingly robust against the introduction of non-magnetic impurities. We show that, very generally, both the pair-breaking and the normal state transport scattering rates are significantly suppressed by strong correlations effects arising in the proximity to a Mott insulating state. We also show that the correlation-renormalized scattering amplitude is generically enhanced in the forward direction, an effect which was previously often ascribed to the specific scattering by charged impurities outside the copper-oxide planes.
  • We show that generic SU(2)-invariant random spin-1 chains have phases with an emergent SU(3) symmetry. We map out the full zero-temperature phase diagram and identify two different phases: (i) a conventional random singlet phase (RSP) of strongly bound spin pairs (SU(3) "mesons") and (ii) an unconventional RSP of bound SU(3) "baryons", which are formed, in the great majority, by spin trios located at random positions. The emergent SU(3) symmetry dictates that susceptibilities and correlation functions of both dipolar and quadrupolar spin operators have the same asymptotic behavior.
  • We study impurity healing effects in models of strongly correlated superconductors. We show that in general both the range and the amplitude of the spatial variations caused by nonmagnetic impurities are significantly suppressed in the superconducting as well as in the normal states. We explicitly quantify the weights of the local and the non-local responses to inhomogeneities and show that the former are overwhelmingly dominant over the latter. By quantifying the spatial range of the local response, we show that it is restricted to only a few lattice spacings over a significant range of dopings in the vicinity of the Mott insulating state. We demonstrate that this healing effect is ultimately due to the suppression of charge fluctuations induced by Mottness. We also define and solve analytically a simplified yet accurate model of healing, within which we obtain simple expressions for quantities of direct experimental relevance.
  • We show how exact diagonalization of small clusters can be used as a fast and reliable impurity solver by determining the phase diagram and physical properties of the bosonic single-impurity Anderson model. This is specially important for applications which require the solution of a large number of different single-impurity problems, such as the bosonic dynamical mean field theory of disordered systems. In particular, we investigate the connection between spontaneous global gauge symmetry breaking and the occurrence of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). We show how BEC is accurately signaled by the appearance of broken symmetry, even when a fairly modest number of states is retained. The occurrence of symmetry breaking can be detected both by adding a small conjugate field or, as in generic quantum critical points, by the divergence of the associated phase susceptibility. Our results show excellent agreement with the considerably more demanding numerical renormalization group (NRG) method. We also investigate the mean impurity occupancy and its fluctuations, identifying an asymmetry in their critical behavior across the quantum phase transitions between BEC and `Mott' phases.
  • We provide a review of recently-develop dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) approaches to the general problem of strongly correlated electronic systems with disorder. We first describe the standard DMFT approach, which is exact in the limit of large coordination, and explain why in its simplest form it cannot capture either Anderson localization or the glassy behavior of electrons. Various extensions of DMFT are then described, including statistical DMFT, typical medium theory, and extended DMFT, methods specifically designed to overcome the limitations of the original formulation. We provide an overview of the results obtained using these approaches, including the formation of electronic Griffiths phases, the self-organized criticality of the Coulomb glass, and the two-fluid behavior near Mott-Anderson transitions. Finally, we outline research directions that may provide a route to bridge the gap between the DMFT-based theories and the complementary diffusion-mode approaches to the metal-insulator transition.
  • We study the low temperature transport characteristics of a disordered metal in the presence of electron-electron interactions. We compare Hartree-Fock and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations to investigate the scattering processes of quasiparticles off the screened disorder potential and show that both the local and non-local (coming from long-ranged Friedel oscillations) contributions to the renormalized disorder potential are suppressed in strongly renormalized Fermi liquids. Our results provide one more example of the power of DMFT to include higher order terms left out by weak-coupling theories.
  • We study how well-known effects of the long-ranged Friedel oscillations are affected by strong electronic correlations. We first show that their range and amplitude are significantly suppressed in strongly renormalized Fermi liquids. We then investigate the interplay of elastic and inelastic scattering in the presence of these oscillations. In the singular case of two-dimensional systems, we show how the anomalous ballistic scattering rate is confined to a very restricted temperature range even for moderate correlations. In general, our analytical results indicate that a prominent role of Friedel oscillations is relegated to weakly interacting systems.
  • We present a large-N variational approach to describe the magnetism of insulating doped semiconductors based on a disorder-generalization of the resonating-valence-bond theory for quantum antiferromagnets. This method captures all the qualitative and even quantitative predictions of the strong-disorder renormalization group approach over the entire experimentally relevant temperature range. Finally, by mapping the problem on a hard-sphere fluid, we could provide an essentially exact analytic solution without any adjustable parameters.
  • We investigate the effects of disorder within the T=0 Brinkman-Rice (BR) scenario for the Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT) in two dimensions (2d). For sufficiently weak disorder the transition retains the Mott character, as signaled by the vanishing of the local quasiparticles (QP) weights Z_{i} and strong disorder screening at criticality. In contrast to the behavior in high dimensions, here the local spatial fluctuations of QP parameters are strongly enhanced in the critical regime, with a distribution function P(Z) ~ Z^{\alpha-1} and \alpha tends to zero at the transition. This behavior indicates a robust emergence of an electronic Griffiths phase preceding the MIT, in a fashion surprisingly reminiscent of the "Infinite Randomness Fixed Point" scenario for disordered quantum magnets.
  • We investigate the effects of weak to moderate disorder on the T=0 Mott metal-insulator transition in two dimensions. Our model calculations demonstrate that the electronic states close to the Fermi energy become more spatially homogeneous in the critical region. Remarkably, the higher energy states show the opposite behavior: they display enhanced spatial inhomogeneity precisely in the close vicinity to the Mott transition. We suggest that such energy-resolved disorder screening is a generic property of disordered Mott systems.
  • We revisit the problem of the quarter-filled one-dimensional Kondo lattice model, for which the existence of a dimerized phase and a non-zero charge gap had been reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. \textbf{90}, 247204 (2003). Recently, some objections were raised claiming that the system is neither dimerized nor has a charge gap. In the interest of clarifying this important issue, we show that these objections are based on results obtained under conditions in which the dimer order is artificially suppressed. We use the incontrovertible dimerized phase of the Majumdar-Ghosh point of the $J_{1}-J_{2}$ Heisenberg model as a paradigm with which to illustrate this artificial suppression. Finally, by means of extremely accurate DMRG calculations, we show that the charge gap is indeed non-zero in the dimerized phase.
  • We report measurements of temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility, resonant x-ray magnetic scattering (XRMS) and heat capacity on single crystals of Tb1-xLaxRhIn5 for nominal concentrations in the range 0.0 < x < 1.0. TbRhIn5 is an antiferromagnetic (AFM) compound with TN ~ 46 K, which is the highest TN values along the RRhIn5 series. We explore the suppression of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) state as a function of La-doping considering the effects of La-induced dilution and perturbations to the tetragonal crystalline electrical field (CEF) on the long range magnetic interaction between the Tb$^{3+}$ ions. Additionally, we also discuss the role of disorder. Our results and analysis are compared to the properties of the undoped compound and of other members of the RRhIn5 family and structurally related compounds (R2RhIn8 and RIn3). The XRMS measurements reveal that the commensurate magnetic structure with the magnetic wave-vector (0,1/2,1/2) observed for the undoped compound is robust against doping perturbations in Tb0.6La0.4RhIn5 compound.
  • We analyze the bipartite and multipartite entanglement for the ground state of the one-dimensional XY model in a transverse magnetic field in the thermodynamical limit. We explicitly take into account the spontaneous symmetry breaking in order to explore the relation between entanglement and quantum phase transitions. As a result we show that while both bipartite and multipartite entanglement can be enhanced by spontaneous symmetry breaking deep into the ferromagnetic phase, only the latter is affected by it in the vicinity of the critical point. This result adds to the evidence that multipartite, and not bipartite, entanglement is the fundamental indicator of long range correlations in quantum phase transitions.
  • Using strong-disorder renormalization group, numerical exact diagonalization, and quantum Monte Carlo methods, we revisit the random antiferromagnetic XXZ spin-1/2 chain focusing on the long-length and ground-state behavior of the average time-independent spin-spin correlation function C(l)=\upsilon l^{-\eta}. In addition to the well-known universal (disorder-independent) power-law exponent \eta=2, we find interesting universal features displayed by the prefactor \upsilon=\upsilon_o/3, if l is odd, and \upsilon=\upsilon_e/3, otherwise. Although \upsilon_o and \upsilon_e are nonuniversal (disorder dependent) and distinct in magnitude, the combination \upsilon_o + \upsilon_e = -1/4 is universal if C is computed along the symmetric (longitudinal) axis. The origin of the nonuniversalities of the prefactors is discussed in the renormalization-group framework where a solvable toy model is considered. Moreover, we relate the average correlation function with the average entanglement entropy, whose amplitude has been recently shown to be universal. The nonuniversalities of the prefactors are shown to contribute only to surface terms of the entropy. Finally, we discuss the experimental relevance of our results by computing the structure factor whose scaling properties, interestingly, depend on the correlation prefactors.
  • We solve the Dynamical Mean Field Theory equations for the Hubbard model away from the particle-hole symmetric case using the Density Matrix Renormalization Group method. We focus our study on the region of strong interactions and finite doping where two solutions coexist. We obtain precise predictions for the boundaries of the coexistence region. In addition, we demonstrate the capabilities of this precise method by obtaining the frequency dependent optical conductivity spectra.
  • We report on a new computational model to efficiently simulate carbon nanotubebased field effect transistors (CNT-FET). In the model, a central region is formed by a semiconducting nanotube that acts as the conducting channel, surrounded by a thin oxide layer and a metal gate electrode. At both ends of the semiconducting channel, two semi-infinite metallic reservoirs act as source and drain contacts. The current-voltage characteristics are computed using the Landauer formalism, including the effect of the Schottky barrier physics. The main operational regimes of the CNT-FET are described, including thermionic and tunnel current components, capturing ambipolar conduction, multichannel ballistic transport and electrostatics dominated by the nanotube capacitance. The calculations are successfully compared to results given by more sophisticated methods based on non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF).
  • In this work we report the physical properties of the new intermetallic compound TbRhIn5 investigated by means of temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity, heat-capacity and resonant x-ray magnetic diffraction experiments. TbRhIn5 is an intermetallic compound that orders antiferromagnetically at TN = 45.5 K, the highest ordering temperature among the existing RRhIn5 (1-1-5, R = rare earth) materials. This result is in contrast to what is expected from a de Gennes scaling along the RRhIn5 series. The X-ray resonant diffraction data below TN reveal a commensurate antiferromagnetic (AFM) structure with a propagation vector (1/2 0 1/2) and the Tb moments oriented along the c-axis. Strong (over two order of magnitude) dipolar enhancements of the magnetic Bragg peaks were observed at both Tb absorption edges LII and LIII, indicating a fairly high polarization of the Tb 5d levels. Using a mean field model including an isotropic first-neighbors exchange interaction J(R-R) and the tetragonal crystalline electrical field (CEF), we were able to fit our experimental data and to explain the direction of the ordered Tb-moments and the enhanced TN of this compound. The evolution of the magnetic properties along the RRhIn5 series and its relation to CEF effects for a given rare-earth is discussed.
  • We examine the interplay of the Kondo effect and the RKKY interactions in electronic Griffiths phases using extended dynamical mean-field theory methods. We find that sub-Ohmic dissipation is generated for sufficiently strong disorder, leading to suppression of Kondo screening on a finite fraction of spins, and giving rise to universal spin-liquid behavior.
  • Systematic deviations from standard Fermi-liquid behavior have been widely observed and documented in several classes of strongly correlated metals. For many of these systems, mounting evidence is emerging that the anomalous behavior is most likely triggered by the interplay of quenched disorder and strong electronic correlations. In this review, we present a broad overview of such disorder-driven non-Fermi-liquid behavior, and discuss various examples where the anomalies have been studied in detail. We describe both their phenomenological aspects as observed in experiment, and the current theoretical scenarios that attempt to unravel their microscopic origin.
  • Effects of disorder are examined in itinerant systems close to quantum critical points. We argue that spin fluctuations associated with the long-range part of the RKKY interactions generically induce non-Ohmic dissipation due to rare disorder configurations. This dissipative mechanism is found to destabilize quantum Griffiths phase behavior in itinerant systems with arbitrary symmetry of the order parameter, leading to the formation of a "cluster glass" phase preceding uniform ordering.
  • We investigate the effect of strong spin-orbit interaction on the electronic transport through non-magnetic impurities in one-dimensional systems. When a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, the electron spin polarization becomes momentum-dependent and spin-flip scattering appears, to first order in the applied field, in addition to the usual potential scattering. We analyze a situation in which, by tuning the Fermi level and the Rashba coupling, the magnetic field can suppress the potential scattering. This mechanism should give rise to a significant negative magnetoresistance in the limit of large barriers.
  • Using the density matrix renormalization group technique, we study spin superlattices composed of a repeated pattern of two spin-1/2 XXZ chains with different anisotropy parameters. The magnetization curve can exhibit two plateaus, a non trivial plateau with the magnetization value given by the relative sizes of the sub-chains and another trivial plateau with zero magnetization. We find good agreement of the value and the width of the plateaus with the analytical results obtained previously. In the gapless regions away from the plateaus, we compare the finite-size spin gap with the predictions based on bosonization and find reasonable agreement. These results confirm the validity of the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid superlattice description of these systems.