• Suzaku X-ray observations of a young supernova remnant, Cassiopeia A, were carried out. K-shell transition lines from highly ionized ions of various elements were detected, including Chromium (Cr-Kalpha at 5.61 keV). The X-ray continuum spectra were modeled in the 3.4--40 keV band, summed over the entire remnant, and were fitted with a simplest combination of the thermal bremsstrahlung and the non-thermal cut-off power-law models. The spectral fits with this assumption indicate that the continuum emission is likely to be dominated by the non-thermal emission with a cut-off energy at > 1 keV. The thermal-to-nonthermal fraction of the continuum flux in the 4-10 keV band is best estimated as ~0.1. Non-thermal-dominated continuum images in the 4--14 keV band were made. The peak of the non-thermal X-rays appears at the western part. The peak position of the TeV gamma-rays measured with HEGRA and MAGIC is also shifted at the western part with the 1-sigma confidence. Since the location of the X-ray continuum emission was known to be presumably identified with the reverse shock region, the possible keV-TeV correlations give a hint that the accelerated multi-TeV hadrons in Cassiopeia A are dominated by heavy elements in the reverse shock region.
  • Tycho's supernova remnant was observed by the XIS and HXD instruments onboard the Suzaku satellite on 2006 June 26-29 for 92 ks. The spectrum up to 30 keV was well fitted with a two-component model, consisting of a power-law with photon index of 2.7 and a thermal bremsstrahlung model with temperature of 4.7 keV. The former component can alternatively be modeled as synchrotron emission from a population of relativistic electrons with an estimated roll-off energy of around 1 keV. In the XIS spectra, in addition to the prominent Fe K_alpha line (6.445 keV), we observe for the first time significant K_alpha line emission from the trace species Cr and Mn at energies of 5.48 keV and 5.95 keV, respectively. Faint K_beta lines from Ca (4.56 keV) and Fe (7.11 keV) are also seen. The ionization states of Cr and Mn, based on their line centroids, are estimated to be similar to that of Fe K_alpha (Fe XV or XVI).
  • The NeXT mission has been proposed to study high-energy non-thermal phenomena in the universe. The high-energy response of the super mirror will enable us to perform the first sensitive imaging observations up to 80 keV. The focal plane detector, which combines a fully depleted X-ray CCD and a pixellated CdTe detector, will provide spectra and images in the wide energy range from 0.5 keV to 80 keV. In the soft gamma-ray band up to ~1 MeV, a narrow field-of-view Compton gamma-ray telescope utilizing several tens of layers of thin Si or CdTe detector will provide precise spectra with much higher sensitivity than present instruments. The continuum sensitivity will reach several times 10^(-8) photons/s/keV/cm^(2) in the hard X-ray region and a few times10^(-7) photons/s/keV/cm^(2) in the soft gamma-ray region.
  • We report on a new photon-counting detector possessing unprecedented spatial resolution, moderate spectral resolution and high background-rejection capability for 0.1-100 keV X-rays. It consists of an X-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) and scintillator. The scintillator is directly deposited on the back surface of the X-ray CCD. Low-energy X-rays below 10 keV can be directly detected in the CCD. The majority of hard X-rays above 10 keV pass through the CCD but can be detected in the scintillator, generating optical photons there. Since CCDs have a moderate detection efficiency for optical photons, they can again be absorbed by the CCD. We demonstrate the high spatial resolution of 10 micron order for 17.4 keV X-rays with our prototype device.
  • We have investigated the radiation damage effects on a CCD to be employed in the Japanese X-ray astronomy mission including the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Since low energy protons release their energy mainly at the charge transfer channel, resulting a decrease of the charge transfer efficiency, we thus focused on the low energy protons in our experiments. A 171 keV to 3.91 MeV proton beam was irradiated to a given device. We measured the degradation of the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) as a function of incremental fluence. A 292 keV proton beam degraded the CTI most seriously. Taking into account the proton energy dependence of the CTI, we confirmed that the transfer channel has the lowest radiation tolerance. We have also developed the different device architectures to reduce the radiation damage in orbit. Among them, the ``notch'' CCD, in which the buried channel implant concentration is increased, resulting in a deeper potential well than outside, has three times higher radiation tolerance than that of the normal CCD. We then estimated the charge transfer inefficiency of the CCD in the orbit of ISS, considering the proton energy spectrum. The CTI value is estimated to be 1.1e-5 per each transfer after two years of mission life in the worse case analysis if the highest radiation-tolerant device is employed. This value is well within the acceptable limit and we have confirmed the high radiation-tolerance of CCDs for the MAXI mission.
  • We have employed a mesh experiment for back-illuminated (BI) CCDs. BI CCDs possess the same structure to those of FI CCDs. Since X-ray photons enter from the back surface of the CCD, a primary charge cloud is formed far from the electrodes. The primary charge cloud expands through diffusion process until it reaches the potential well that is just below the electrodes. Therefore, the diffusion time for the charge cloud produced is longer than that in the FI CCD, resulting a larger charge cloud shape expected. The mesh experiment enables us to specify the X-ray point of interaction with a subpixel resolution. We then have measured a charge cloud shape produced in the BI CCD. We found that there are two components of the charge cloud shape having different size: a narrow component and a broad component. The size of the narrow component is $2.8-5.7 \mu$m in unit of a standard deviation and strongly depends on the attenuation length in Si of incident X-rays. The shorter the attenuation length of X-rays is, the larger the charge cloud becomes. This result is qualitatively consistent with a diffusion model inside the CCD. On the other hand, the size of the broad component is roughly constant of $\simeq 13 \mu$m and does not depend on X-ray energies. Judging from the design value of the CCD and the fraction of each component, we conclude that the narrow component is originated in the depletion region whereas the broad component is in the field-free region.
  • A charge-coupled device (CCD) is a standard imager in optical region in which the image quality is limited by its pixel size. CCDs also function in X-ray region but with substantial differences in performance. An optical photon generates only one electron while an X-ray photon generates many electrons at a time. We developed a method to precisely determine the X-ray point of interaction with subpixel resolution. In particular, we found that a back-illuminated CCD efficiently functions as a fine imager. We present here the validity of our method through an actual imaging experiment.
  • Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) on the International Space Station (ISS) has two kinds of X-ray detectors: the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) and the Solid-state Slit Camera (SSC). SSC is an X-ray CCD array, consisting of 16 chips, which has the best energy resolution as an X-ray all-sky monitor in the energy band of 0.5 to 10 keV. Each chip consists of 1024x1024 pixels with a pixel size of 24$\mu$m, thus the total area is ~200 cm^2. We have developed an engineering model of SSC, i.e., CCD chips, electronics, the software and so on, and have constructed the calibration system. We here report the current status of the development and the calibration of SSC.
  • The newly discovered supernova remnant G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622), along the line of sight to the Vela SNR, was observed with ASCA for 120 ks. We find that the X-ray spectrum is featureless, and well described by a power law, extending to three the class of shell-type SNRs dominated by nonthermal X-ray emission. Although the presence of the Vela SNR compromises our ability to accurately determine the column density, the GIS data appear to indicate absorption considerably in excess of that for Vela itself, indicating that G266.2-1.2 may be several times more distant. An unresolved central source may be an associated neutron star, though difficulties with this interpretation persist.
  • Several shrapnels have been detected in the vicinity of Vela SNR by the ROSAT all-sky survey. We present here the spectral properties of shrapnel `A' observed with the ASCA satellite. A prominent Si-K emission line with relatively weak emission lines from other elements have been detected, revealing that the relative abundance of Si is a few ten-times higher than those of other elements. Combining with the ROSAT PSPC results, we obtained the electron temperature, $kT_{\rm e}$, to be $0.33 \pm 0.01$ keV. The total mass of shrapnel `A' is estimated to be $\sim 0.01 M_\odot$. If it is an ejecta of a supernova explosion, the interstellar matter (ISM) would be swept up in the leading edge while the ejecta material would be peeled off in the trailing edge, which should be confirmed by future observations.
  • MAXI, Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image, is the X-ray observatory on the Japanese experimental module (JEM) Exposed Facility (EF) on the International Space Station (ISS). MAXI is a slit scanning camera which consists of two kinds of X-ray detectors: one is a one-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counter with a total area of $\sim 5000 cm^2$, the Gas Slit Camera (GSC), and the other is an X-ray CCD array with a total area $\sim 200 cm^2$, the Solid-state Slit Camera (SSC). The GSC subtends a field of view with an angular dimension of 1$^\circ\times 180^\circ$ while the SSC subtends a field of view with an angular dimension of 1$^\circ$ times a little less than 180$^\circ$. In the course of one station orbit, MAXI can scan almost the entire sky with a precision of 1$^\circ$ and with an X-ray energy range of 0.5-30 keV. We have developed the engineering model of CCD chips and the analogue electronics for the SSC. The energy resolution of EM CCD for Mn K$\alpha$ has a full-width at half maximum of $\simeq$ 182 eV. Readout noise is $\simeq$ 11 e^- rms.
  • We present here the results of the mapping observation of the Cygnus Loop with the Gas Imaging Spectrometer (GIS) onboard the ASCA observatory. The data covered the entire region of the Cygnus Loop. Spatial resolution of the GIS is moderate whereas the energy resolving power is much better than those used in the previous observations. The ASCA soft-band image shows the well-known shell-like feature whereas the ASCA hard-band image shows rather center-filled morphology with a hard X-ray compact source at the blow-up southern region.
  • We detected an X-ray compact source inside the Cygnus Loop during the observation project of the whole Cygnus Loop with the ASCA GIS. The source intensity is 0.11 c s$^{-1}$ for GIS and 0.15 c s$^{-1}$ for SIS, which is the strongest in the ASCA band. The X-ray spectra are well fitted by a power law spectrum of a photon index of \error{-2.1}{0.1} with neutral H column of (\error{3.1}{0.6})${\rm \times 10^{21} cm^{-2}}$. Taking into account the interstellar absorption feature, this source is X-ray bright mainly above 1 keV suggesting either an AGN or a rotating neutron star. So far, we did not detect intensity variation nor coherent pulsation mainly due to the limited observation time. There are several optical bright stellar objects within the error region of the X-ray image. We carried out the optical spectroscopy for the brightest source (V=+12.6) and found it to be a G star. The follow up deep observation both in optical and in X-ray wavelengths are strongly required.