• We report highly tunable control of holes in Ge/Si core/shell nanowires (NWs). We demonstrate the ability to create single quantum dots (QDs) of various sizes, with low hole occupation numbers and clearly observable excited states. For the smallest dot size we observe indications of single-hole occupation. Moreover, we create double and triple tunnel-coupled quantum dot arrays. In the double quantum dot configuration we observe Pauli spin blockade (PSB). These results open the way to perform hole spin qubit experiments in these devices.
  • Semiconductor nanowires such as InAs and InSb are promising materials for studying Majorana zero-modes and demonstrating non-Abelian particle exchange relevant for topological quantum computing. While evidence for Majorana bound states in nanowires has been shown, the majority of these experiments are marked by significant disorder. In particular, the interfacial inhomogeneity between the superconductor and nanowire is strongly believed to be the main culprit for disorder and the resulting soft superconducting gap ubiquitous in tunneling studies of hybrid semiconductor-superconductor systems. We resolve this problem through the development of selective-area epitaxy of Al to InSb nanowires, a technique applicable to other nanowires and superconductors. Epitaxial InSb-Al devices generically demonstrate ballistic 1D superconductivity in the single mode regime and a hard superconducting gap, requisites for engineering 1D topological superconductivity. Our results pave the way for the development of networks of ballistic superconducting electronics for quantum device applications.
  • We report an experimental study of one-dimensional (1D) electronic transport in an InSb semiconducting nanowire. Three bottom gates are used to locally deplete the nanowire creating a ballistic quantum point contact with only a few conducting channels. In a magnetic field, the Zeeman splitting of the corresponding 1D subbands is revealed by the emergence of conductance plateaus at multiples of $e^2$/h, yet we find a quantized conductance pattern largely dependent on the configuration of voltages applied to the bottom gates. In particular, we can make the first plateau disappear leaving a first conductance step of 2$e^2/h$, which is indicative of a remarkable two-fold subband degeneracy that can persist up to several Tesla. For certain gate voltage settings, we also observe the presence of discrete resonant states producing conductance features that can resemble those expected from the opening of a helical gap in the subband structure. We explain our experimental findings through the formation of two spatially separated 1D conduction channels.
  • Realizing topological superconductivity and Majorana zero modes in the laboratory is one of the major goals in condensed matter physics. We review the current status of this rapidly-developing field, focusing on semiconductor-superconductor proposals for topological superconductivity. Material science progress and robust signatures of Majorana zero modes in recent experiments are discussed. After a brief introduction to the subject, we outline several next-generation experiments probing exotic properties of Majorana zero modes, including fusion rules and non-Abelian exchange statistics. Finally, we discuss prospects for implementing Majorana-based topological quantum computation in these systems.
  • The Josephson effect describes supercurrent flowing through a junction connecting two superconducting leads by a thin barrier [1]. This current is driven by a superconducting phase difference $\phi$ between the leads. In the presence of chiral and time reversal symmetry of the Cooper pair tunneling process [2] the current is strictly zero when $\phi$ vanishes. Only if these underlying symmetries are broken the supercurrent for $\phi=0$ may be finite [3-5]. This corresponds to a ground state of the junction being offset by a phase $\phi_{0}$, different from 0 or $\pi$. Here, we report such a Josephson $\phi_{0}$-junction based on a nanowire quantum dot. We use a quantum interferometer device in order to investigate phase offsets and demonstrate that $\phi_{0}$ can be controlled by electrostatic gating. Our results have possible far reaching implications for superconducting flux and phase defined quantum bits as well as for exploring topological superconductivity in quantum dot systems.
  • We use magnetoconductance measurements in dual-gated InSb nanowire devices together with a theoretical analysis of weak antilocalization to accurately extract spin-orbit strength. In particular, we show that magnetoconductance in our three-dimensional wires is very different compared to wires in two-dimensional electron gases. We obtain a large Rashba spin-orbit strength of $0.5 -1\,\text{eV\r{A}}$ corresponding to a spin-orbit energy of $0.25-1\,\text{meV}$. These values underline the potential of InSb nanowires in the study of Majorana fermions in hybrid semiconductor-superconductor devices.
  • We report the realization of quantum microwave circuits using hybrid superconductor-semiconductor Josephson elements comprised of InAs nanowires contacted by NbTiN. Capacitively-shunted single elements behave as transmon qubits with electrically tunable transition frequencies. Two-element circuits also exhibit transmon-like behavior near zero applied flux, but behave as flux qubits at half the flux quantum, where non-sinusoidal current-phase relations in the elements produce a double-well Josephson potential. These hybrid Josephson elements are promising for applications requiring microwave superconducting circuits operating in magnetic field.
  • Soon after the first measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a condensed matter system, Bloch predicted the presence of statistical fluctuations proportional to $1/\sqrt{N}$ in the polarization of an ensemble of $N$ spins. First observed by Sleator et al., so-called "spin noise" has recently emerged as a critical ingredient in nanometer-scale magnetic resonance imaging (nanoMRI). This prominence is a direct result of MRI resolution improving to better than 100 nm^3, a size-scale in which statistical spin fluctuations begin to dominate the polarization dynamics. We demonstrate a technique that creates spin order in nanometer-scale ensembles of nuclear spins by harnessing these fluctuations to produce polarizations both larger and narrower than the natural thermal distribution. We focus on ensembles containing ~10^6 phosphorus and hydrogen spins associated with single InP and GaP nanowires (NWs) and their hydrogen-containing adsorbate layers. We monitor, control, and capture fluctuations in the ensemble's spin polarization in real-time and store them for extended periods. This selective capture of large polarization fluctuations may provide a route for enhancing the weak magnetic signals produced by nanometer-scale volumes of nuclear spins. The scheme may also prove useful for initializing the nuclear hyperfine field of electron spin qubits in the solid-state.
  • Single electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are a versatile platform for quantum information processing, however controlling decoherence remains a considerable challenge. Recently, hole spins have emerged as a promising alternative. Holes in III-V semiconductors have unique properties, such as strong spin-orbit interaction and weak coupling to nuclear spins, and therefore have potential for enhanced spin control and longer coherence times. Weaker hyperfine interaction has already been reported in self-assembled quantum dots using quantum optics techniques. However, challenging fabrication has so far kept the promise of hole-spin-based electronic devices out of reach in conventional III-V heterostructures. Here, we report gate-tuneable hole quantum dots formed in InSb nanowires. Using these devices we demonstrate Pauli spin blockade and electrical control of single hole spins. The devices are fully tuneable between hole and electron QDs, enabling direct comparison between the hyperfine interaction strengths, g-factors and spin blockade anisotropies in the two regimes.
  • Due to the strong spin-orbit interaction in indium antimonide, orbital motion and spin are no longer separated. This enables fast manipulation of qubit states by means of microwave electric fields. We report Rabi oscillation frequencies exceeding 100 MHz for spin-orbit qubits in InSb nanowires. Individual qubits can be selectively addressed due to intrinsic dierences in their g-factors. Based on Ramsey fringe measurements, we extract a coherence time T_2* = 8 +/- 1 ns at a driving frequency of 18.65 GHz. Applying a Hahn echo sequence extends this coherence time to 35 ns.
  • We use electric dipole spin resonance to measure dynamic nuclear polarization in InAs nanowire quantum dots. The resonance shifts in frequency when the system transitions between metastable high and low current states, indicating the presence of nuclear polarization. We propose that the low and the high current states correspond to different total Zeeman energy gradients between the two quantum dots. In the low current state, dynamic nuclear polarization efficiently compensates the Zeeman gradient due to the $g$-factor mismatch, resulting in a suppressed total Zeeman gradient. We present a theoretical model of electron-nuclear feedback that demonstrates a fixed point in nuclear polarization for nearly equal Zeeman splittings in the two dots and predicts a narrowed hyperfine gradient distribution.
  • Double quantum dot in the few-electron regime is achieved using local gating in an InSb nanowire. The spectrum of two-electron eigenstates is investigated using electric dipole spin resonance. Singlet-triplet level repulsion caused by spin-orbit interaction is observed. The size and the anisotropy of singlet-triplet repulsion are used to determine the magnitude and the orientation of the spin-orbit effective field in an InSb nanowire double dot. The obtained results are confirmed using spin blockade leakage current anisotropy and transport spectroscopy of individual quantum dots.
  • Majorana fermions are particles identical to their own antiparticles. They have been theoretically predicted to exist in topological superconductors. We report electrical measurements on InSb nanowires contacted with one normal (Au) and one superconducting electrode (NbTiN). Gate voltages vary electron density and define a tunnel barrier between normal and superconducting contacts. In the presence of magnetic fields of order 100 mT we observe bound, mid-gap states at zero bias voltage. These bound states remain fixed to zero bias even when magnetic fields and gate voltages are changed over considerable ranges. Our observations support the hypothesis of Majorana fermions in nanowires coupled to superconductors.
  • We perform polarization-resolved magneto-optical measurements on single InAsP quantum dots embedded in an InP nanowire. In order to determine all elements of the electron and hole $g$-factor tensors, we measure in magnetic field with different orientations. The results of these measurements are in good agreement with a model based on exchange terms and Zeeman interaction. In our experiment, polarization analysis delivers a powerful tool that not only significantly increases the precision of the measurements, but also enables us to probe the exciton spin state evolution in magnetic fields. We propose a disentangling scheme of heavy-hole exciton spins enabling a measurement of the electron spin $T_2$ time.
  • Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) on Bragg reflections is a promising technique for the study of three-dimensional (3D) composition and strain fields in nanostructures, which can be recovered directly from the coherent diffraction data recorded on single objects. In this article we report results obtained for single homogeneous and heterogeneous nanowires with a diameter smaller than 100 nm, for which we used CDI to retrieve information about deformation and faults existing in these wires. The article also discusses the influence of stacking faults, which can create artefacts during the reconstruction of the nanowire shape and deformation.