• L. Amati, P. O'Brien, D. Goetz, E. Bozzo, C. Tenzer, F. Frontera, G. Ghirlanda, C. Labanti, J. P. Osborne, G. Stratta, N. Tanvir, R. Willingale, P. Attina, R. Campana, A.J. Castro-Tirado, C. Contini, F. Fuschino, A. Gomboc, R. Hudec, P. Orleanski, E. Renotte, T. Rodic, Z. Bagoly, A. Blain, P. Callanan, S. Covino, A. Ferrara, E. Le Floch, M. Marisaldi, S. Mereghetti, P. Rosati, A. Vacchi, P. D'Avanzo, P. Giommi, A. Gomboc, S. Piranomonte, L. Piro, V. Reglero, A. Rossi, A. Santangelo, R. Salvaterra, G. Tagliaferri, S. Vergani, S. Vinciguerra, M. Briggs, E. Campolongo, R. Ciolfi, V. Connaughton, B. Cordier, B. Morelli, M. Orlandini, C. Adami, A. Argan, J.-L. Atteia, N. Auricchio, L. Balazs, G. Baldazzi, S. Basa, R. Basak, P. Bellutti, M. G. Bernardini, G. Bertuccio, J. Braga, M. Branchesi, S. Brandt, E. Brocato, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, A. Bulgarelli, L. Burderi, J. Camp, S. Capozziello, J. Caruana, P. Casella, B. Cenko, P. Chardonnet, B. Ciardi, S. Colafrancesco, M. G. Dainotti, V. D'Elia, D. De Martino, M. De Pasquale, E. Del Monte, M. Della Valle, A. Drago, Y. Evangelista, M. Feroci, F. Finelli, M. Fiorini, J. Fynbo, A. Gal-Yam, B. Gendre, G. Ghisellini, A. Grado, C. Guidorzi, M. Hafizi, L. Hanlon, J. Hjorth, L. Izzo, L. Kiss, P. Kumar, I. Kuvvetli, M. Lavagna, T. Li, F. Longo, M. Lyutikov, U. Maio, E. Maiorano, P. Malcovati, D. Malesani, R. Margutti, A. Martin-Carrillo, N. Masetti, S. McBreen, R. Mignani, G. Morgante, C. Mundell, H. U. Nargaard-Nielsen, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, S. Paltani, F. Panessa, G. Pareschi, A. Pe'er, A. V. Penacchioni, E. Pian, E. Piedipalumbo, T. Piran, G. Rauw, M. Razzano, A. Read, L. Rezzolla, P. Romano, R. Ruffini, S. Savaglio, V. Sguera, P. Schady, W. Skidmore, L. Song, E. Stanway, R. Starling, M. Topinka, E. Troja, M. van Putten, E. Vanzella, S. Vercellone, C. Wilson-Hodge, D. Yonetoku, G. Zampa, N. Zampa, B. Zhang, B. B. Zhang, S. Zhang, S.-N. Zhang, A. Antonelli, F. Bianco, S. Boci, M. Boer, M. T. Botticella, O. Boulade, C. Butler, S. Campana, F. Capitanio, A. Celotti, Y. Chen, M. Colpi, A. Comastri, J.-G. Cuby, M. Dadina, A. De Luca, Y.-W. Dong, S. Ettori, P. Gandhi, E. Geza, J. Greiner, S. Guiriec, J. Harms, M. Hernanz, A. Hornstrup, I. Hutchinson, G. Israel, P. Jonker, Y. Kaneko, N. Kawai, K. Wiersema, S. Korpela, V. Lebrun, F. Lu, A. MacFadyen, G. Malaguti, L. Maraschi, A. Melandri, M. Modjaz, D. Morris, N. Omodei, A. Paizis, P. Pata, V. Petrosian, A. Rachevski, J. Rhoads, F. Ryde, L. Sabau-Graziati, N. Shigehiro, M. Sims, J. Soomin, D. Szecsi, Y. Urata, M. Uslenghi, L. Valenziano, G. Vianello, S. Vojtech, D. Watson, J. Zicha
    March 27, 2018 astro-ph.IM, astro-ph.HE
    THESEUS is a space mission concept aimed at exploiting Gamma-Ray Bursts for investigating the early Universe and at providing a substantial advancement of multi-messenger and time-domain astrophysics. These goals will be achieved through a unique combination of instruments allowing GRB and X-ray transient detection over a broad field of view (more than 1sr) with 0.5-1 arcmin localization, an energy band extending from several MeV down to 0.3 keV and high sensitivity to transient sources in the soft X-ray domain, as well as on-board prompt (few minutes) follow-up with a 0.7 m class IR telescope with both imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. THESEUS will be perfectly suited for addressing the main open issues in cosmology such as, e.g., star formation rate and metallicity evolution of the inter-stellar and intra-galactic medium up to redshift $\sim$10, signatures of Pop III stars, sources and physics of re-ionization, and the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In addition, it will provide unprecedented capability to monitor the X-ray variable sky, thus detecting, localizing, and identifying the electromagnetic counterparts to sources of gravitational radiation, which may be routinely detected in the late '20s / early '30s by next generation facilities like aLIGO/ aVirgo, eLISA, KAGRA, and Einstein Telescope. THESEUS will also provide powerful synergies with the next generation of multi-wavelength observatories (e.g., LSST, ELT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA).
  • In the framework of phantom quintessence cosmology, we use the Noether Symmetry Approach to obtain general exact solutions for the cosmological equations. This result is achieved by the quintessential (phantom) potential determined by the existence of the symmetry itself. A comparison between the theoretical model and observations is worked out. In particular, we use type Ia supernovae and large scale structure parameters determined from the 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS)and from the Wide part of the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS). It turns out that the model is compatible with the presently available observational data. Moreover we extend the approach to include radiation. We show that it is compatible with data derived from recombination and it seems that quintessence do not affect nucleosynthesis results.
  • The weak field limit for a pointlike source of a $f(R) \propto R^{3/2}$-gravity model is studied. We aim to show the viability of such a model as a valid alternative to GR + dark matter at Galactic and local scales. Without considering dark matter, within the weak field approximation, we find general exact solutions for gravity with standard matter, and apply them to some astrophysical scales, recovering the consistency of the same $f(R)$-gravity model with cosmological results.}{In particular, we show that it is possible to obtain flat rotation curves for galaxies, [and consistency with] Solar System tests, as in the so-called "Chameleon Approach". In fact, the peripheral velocity $ v_\infty $ is shown to be expressed as $ v_\infty = \lambda \sqrt{M}$, so that the Tully-Fisher relation is recovered. The results point out the possibility of achieving alternative theories of gravity in which exotic ingredients like dark matter and dark energy are not necessary, while their coarse-grained astrophysical and cosmological effects can be related to a geometric origin.
  • We consider cosmological models in scalar tensor theories of gravity that describe an accelerating universe, and we study a family of inverse power law potentials, for which exact solutions of the Einstein equations are known. We also compare theoretical predictions of our models with observations. For this we use the following data: the publicly available catalogs of type Ia supernovae and high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts, the parameters of large scale structure determined by the 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), and measurements of cosmological distances based on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, among others.
  • Scalar-tensor quintessence models can be constrained by identifying suitable cosmic clocks which allow to select confidence regions for cosmological parameters. In particular, we constrain the characterizing parameters of non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor cosmological models which admit exact solutions of the Einstein field equations. Lookback time to galaxy clusters at low intermediate, and high redshifts is considered. The high redshift time-scale problem is also discussed in order to select other cosmic clocks such as quasars.
  • Recent observations of the line of sight velocity profile of elliptical galaxies have furnished controversial results with some works favouring the presence of a large amount of dark matter in the outer regions and others arguing in favour of no dark matter at all. In order to shed new light on this controversy, we propose here a new phenomenological description of the total mass profile of galaxies. Under the hypothesis of spherical symmetry, we assume a double power-law expression for the global M/L ratio Upsilon(r)= Upsilon_0(r/r_0) ^{alpha}(1+r/r_0)^{beta}. In particular, Upsilon propto r^{alpha} for r/r_0<<1 so that alpha=0 mimics a constant M/L ratio in the inner regions, while, for (r/r_0>>1), Upsilon propto r^{alpha+beta} thus showing that models with alpha+beta=0 have an asymptotically constant M/L ratio. A wide range of possibilities is obtained by varying the slope parameters in the range we determine on the basis of physical considerations. Choosing a general expression for the luminosity density profile j(r), we work out an effective galaxy model that accounts for all the phenomenology observed in real elliptical galaxies. We derive the main dynamics and lensing properties of such an effective model. We analyze a general class of models, able to take into account different dynamical trends. We are able to obtain analytical expressions for the main dynamical and lensing quantities. We show that constraining the values of alpha+beta makes it possible to analyze the problem of the dark matter in elliptical galaxies. Indeed, positive values of alpha+beta would be a strong evidence for dark matter. Finally we indicate possible future approaches in order to face the observational data, in particular using velocity dispersion profiles and lensed quasar events.
  • We consider scalar tensor theories of gravity assuming that the scalar field is non minimally coupled with gravity. We use this theory to study evolution of a flat homogeneous and isotropic universe. In this case the dynamical equations can be derived form a point like Lagrangian. We study the general properties of dynamics of this system and show that for a wide range of initial conditions such models lead in a natural way to an accelerated phase of expansion of the universe. Assuming that the point like Lagrangian admits a Noether symmetry we are able to explicitly solve the dynamical equations. We study one particular model and show that its predictions are compatible with observational data, namely the publicly available data on type Ia supernovae, the parameters of large scale structure determined by the 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), the measurements of cosmological distances with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and the rate of growth of density perturbations}{It turns out that this model have a very interesting feature of producing in a natural way an epoch of accelerated expansion. With an appropriate choice of parameters our model is fully compatible with several observed characteristics of the universe
  • It has been recently shown that, under some general conditions, it is always possible to find a fourth order gravity theory capable of reproducing the same dynamics of a given dark energy model. Here, we discuss this approach for a dark energy model with a scalar field evolving under the action of an exponential potential. In absence of matter, such a potential can be recovered from a fourth order theory via a conformal transformation. Including the matter term, the function f(R) entering the generalized gravity Lagrangian can be reconstructed according to the dark energy model.
  • We present a new family of spherically symmetric models for the luminous components of elliptical and spiral galaxies and their dark matter haloes. Our starting point is a general expression for the logarithmic slope $\alpha(r) = d\log{\rho}/d\log{r}$ from which most of the cuspy models yet available in literature may be derived. We then dedicate our attention to a particular set of models whose logarithmic slope is a power law function of the radius $r$ investigating in detail their dynamics assuming isotropy in the velocity space. While the basic properties (such as the density profile and the gravitational potential) may be expressed analytically, both the distribution function and the observable quantities (surface brightness and line of sight velocity dispersion) have to be evaluated numerically. We also consider the extension to anisotropic models trying two different parameterization. Since the model recently proposed by Navarro et al. (2004) as the best fit to their sample of numerically simulated haloes belongs to the family we present here, analytical approximations are given for the most useful quantities.
  • We use some of the recently released observational data to test the viability of two classes of minimally coupled scalar field models of quintessence with exponential potentials for which exact solutions of the Einstein equations are known. These models are very sturdy, depending on only one parameter - the Hubble constant. To compare predictions of our models with observations we concentrate on the following data: the power spectrum of the CMBR anisotropy as measured by WMAP, the publicly available data on type Ia supernovae, and the parameters of large scale structure determined by the 2-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS). We use the WMAP data on the age of the universe and the Hubble constant to fix the free parameters in our models. We then show that the predictions of our models are consistent with the observed positions and relative heights of the first 3 peaks in the CMB power spectrum, with the energy density of dark energy as deduced from observations of distant type Ia supernovae, and with parameters of the large scale structure as determined by 2dFGRS, in particular with the average density of dark matter. Our models are also consistent with the results of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Moreover, we investigate the evolution of matter density perturbations in our quintessential models, solve exactly the evolution equation for the density perturbations, and obtain an analytical expression for the growth index $f$. We verify that the approximate relation f ~ Omega_M^(alpha) also holds in our models.
  • The structure of the dark matter and the thermodynamical status of the hot gas in galaxy clusters is an interesting and widely discussed topic in modern astrophysics. Recently, Rasia et al. (2004) have proposed a new dynamical model for the mass density profile of clusters of galaxies as a result of a set of high resolution hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation. We investigate the lensing properties of this model evaluating the deflection angle, the lensing potential and the amplification of the images. We reserve particular attention to the structure and position of the critical curves in order to see whether this model is able to produce radial and tangential arcs. To this aim, we also investigate the effect of taking into account the brightest cluster galaxy in the lensing potential and the deviations from spherical symmetry mimicked by an external shear. We also analyze the implication of the gas density and temperature profiles of the Rasia et al.(2004) model on the properties of the X - ray emission and the comptonization parameter that determines the CMBR temperature decrement due to the Sunyaev - Zel'dovich effect.
  • We present a numerical method to estimate the lensing parameters and the Hubble constant H_0 from quadruply imaged gravitational lens systems. The lens galaxy is modeled using both separable deflection potentials and constant mass-to-light ratio profiles, while possible external perturbations have been taken into account introducing an external shear. The model parameters are recovered inverting the lens and the time delay ratio equations and imposing a set of physically motivated selection criteria. We investigate correlations among the model parameters and the Hubble constant. Finally, we apply the codes to the real lensed quasars PG 1115+080 and RX J0911+0551, and combine the results from these two systems to get H_0 = 56 +/- 23 km/(s Mpc). In addition, we are able to fit to the single systems a general elliptical potential with a non fixed angular part, and then we model the two lens systems with the same potential and a shared H_0: in this last case we estimate H_0=49_(-11)^(+6) km/(s Mpc).
  • We show that a general, exact cosmological solution, where dynamics of scalar field is assigned by an exponential potential, fulfils all the issues of dark energy approach, both from a theoretical point of view and in comparison with available observational data. Moreover, tracking conditions are discussed, with a new treatment of the well known condition $\Gamma>1$. We prove that the currently used expression for $\Gamma$ is wrong.
  • We present a dark energy model with a double exponential potential for a minimally coupled scalar field, which allows general exact integration of the cosmological equations. The solution can perfectly emulate a $\Lambda$-term model at low-medium redshift, exhibits tracking behavior, and does not show eternal acceleration.
  • We discuss the general and approximate angular diameter distance in the Friedman-Robertson-Walker cosmological models with nonzero cosmological constant. We modify the equation for the angular diameter distance by taking into account the fact that locally the distribution of matter is non homogeneous. We present exact solutions of this equation in a few special cases. We propose an approximate analytic solution of this equation which is simple enough and sufficiently accurate to be useful in practical applications.
  • Noether symmetry for higher order gravity theory has been explored, with the introduction of an auxiliary variable which gives the only correct quantum desccription of the theory, as shown in a series of earlier papers. The application of Noether theorem in higher order theory of gravity turned out to be a powerful tool to find the solution of the field equations. A few such physically reasonable solutions like power law inflation are presented.
  • We explore the conditions for the existence of Noether symmetries in the dynamics of FRW metric, non minimally coupled with a scalar field, in the most general situation, and with nonzero spatial curvature. When such symmetries are present we find general exact solution for the Einstein equations. We also show that non Noether symmetries can be found. Finally,we present an extension of the procedure to the Kantowski- Sachs metric which is particularly interesting in the case of degenerate Lagrangian.
  • Taking into account a torsion field gives rise to a negative pressure contribution in cosmological dynamics and then to an accelerated behaviour of Hubble fluid. The presence of torsion has the same effect of a Lambda - term. We obtain a general exact solution which well fits the data coming from high - redshift supernovae and Sunyaev - Zeldovich/X - ray method for the determination of the cosmological parameters. On the other hand, it is possible to obtain observational constraints on the amount of torsion density. A dust dominated Friedmann behaviour is recovered as soon as torsion effects are not relevant.
  • We discuss the amplification dispersion in the observed luminosity of standard candles, like supernovae (SNe) of type Ia, induced by gravitational lensing in a Universe with dark energy (quintessence). We derive the main features of the magnification probability distribution function (pdf) of SNe in the framework of on average Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) models for both lensing by large-scale structures and compact objects. The magnification pdf is strongly dependent on the equation of state, $w_Q$, of the quintessence. The dispersion increases with the redshift of the source and is maximum for dark energy with very large negative pressure; the effects of gravitational lensing on the magnification pdf, i.e. the mode biased towards de-amplified values and the long tail towards large magnifications, are reduced for both microscopic DM and quintessence with an intermediate $w_Q$. Different equations of state of the dark energy can deeply change the dispersion in amplification for the projected observed samples of SNe Ia by future space-born missions. The "noise" in the Hubble diagram due to gravitational lensing strongly affects the determination of the cosmological parameters from SNe data. The errors on the pressureless matter density parameter, $\Omega_M$, and on $w_Q$ are maximum for quintessence with not very negative pressure. The effect of the gravitational lensing is of the same order of the other systematics affecting observations of SNe Ia. Due to the lensing by large-scale structures, in a flat Universe with $\Omega_M =0.4$, at $z=1$ a cosmological constant ($w_Q=-1$) can be interpreted as dark energy with $w_Q <-0.84$ (at 2-$\sigma$ confidence limit).
  • We present a new method to estimate the Hubble constant H_0 from the measured time delays in quadruply imaged gravitational lens systems. We show how it is possible to get an estimate of H_0 without the need to completely reconstruct the lensing potential thus avoiding any a priori hypotheses on the expression of the galaxy lens model. Our method only needs to assume that the lens potential may be expressed as r^{\alpha} F(\theta), whatever the shape function F(\theta) is, and it is thus able to fully explore the degeneracy in the mass models taking also into account the presence of an external shear. We test the method on simulated cases and show that it does work well in recovering the correct value of the slope \alpha of the radial profile and of the Hubble constant H_0. Then, we apply the same method to the real quadruple lenses PG1115+080 and B1422+231 obtaining H_0 = 58_{-15}^{+17} km/s/Mpc (68% CL).
  • We develop a semi - analytical method to reconstruct the lensing potential in quadruply imaged gravitational lens systems. Assuming that the potential belongs to a broad class of boxy non - elliptical models, we show how it is possible to write down a system of equations which can be numerically solved to recover the potential parameters directly from image positions and using physical constraints. We also describe a code developed to search for solutions of the system previously found and test it on simulated cases. Finally, we apply the method to the quadruple lens PG1115+080 which allows us to get also an estimate of the Hubble constant H_0 from the measured time delay as H_0 = 56_{-11}^{+17} km/s/Mpc.
  • We present the first results of the analysis of data collected during the 1998-99 observational campaign at the 1.3 meter McGraw-Hill Telescope, towards the Andromeda galaxy (M31), aimed to the detection of gravitational microlensing effects as a probe of the presence of dark matter in our and in M31 halo. The analysis is performed using the pixel lensing technique, which consists in the study of flux variations of unresolved sources and has been proposed and implemented by the AGAPE collaboration. We carry out a shape analysis by demanding that the detected flux variations be achromatic and compatible with a Paczynski light curve. We apply the Durbin-Watson hypothesis test to the residuals. Furthermore, we consider the background of variables sources. Finally five candidate microlensing events emerge from our selection. Comparing with the predictions of a Monte Carlo simulation, assuming a standard spherical model for the M31 and Galactic haloes, and typical values for the MACHO mass, we find that our events are only marginally consistent with the distribution of observable parameters predicted by the simulation.
  • We investigate the properties of cosmological distances in locally inhomogeneous universes with pressureless matter and dark energy (quintessence), with constant equation of state. We give exact solutions for angular diameter distances in theempty beam approximation. In this hypothesis, the distance-redshift equation is derived fron the multiple lens-plane theory. The case of a flat universe is considered with particular attention. We show how this general scheme makes distances degenerate with respect to w_X and the smoothness parameters, alpha, accounting for the homogeneously distributed fraction of energy of the i-components. We analyse how this degeneracy influences the critical redshift where the angular diameter distance takes its maximum, and put in evidence future prospects for measuring the smoothness parameter of the pressureless matter, alpha_M.