• The possibility of driving phase transitions in low-density condensates through the loss of phase coherence alone has far-reaching implications for the study of quantum phases of matter. This has inspired the development of tools to control and explore the collective properties of condensate phases via phase fluctuations. Electrically-gated oxide interfaces, ultracold Fermi atoms, and cuprate superconductors, which are characterized by an intrinsically small phase-stiffness, are paradigmatic examples where these tools are having a dramatic impact. Here we use light pulses shorter than the internal thermalization time to drive and probe the phase fragility of the Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ cuprate superconductor, completely melting the superconducting condensate without affecting the pairing strength. The resulting ultrafast dynamics of phase fluctuations and charge excitations are captured and disentangled by time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. This work demonstrates the dominant role of phase coherence in the superconductor-to-normal state phase transition and offers a benchmark for non-equilibrium spectroscopic investigations of the cuprate phase diagram.
  • We report on the influence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in the Fe-based superconductors (FeSCs) via application of circularly-polarized spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We combine this technique in representative members of both the Fe-pnictides and Fe-chalcogenides with ab initio density functional theory and tight-binding calculations to establish an ubiquitous modification of the electronic structure in these materials imbued by SOC. The influence of SOC is found to be concentrated on the hole pockets where the superconducting gap is generally found to be largest. This result contests descriptions of superconductivity in these materials in terms of pure spin-singlet eigenstates, raising questions regarding the possible pairing mechanisms and role of SOC therein.
  • A possible connection between extremely large magneto-resistance and the presence of Weyl points has garnered much attention in the study of topological semimetals. Exploration of these concepts in transition metal phosphide WP2 has been complicated by conflicting experimental reports. Here we combine angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to disentangle surface and bulk contributions to the ARPES intensity, the superposition of which has plagued the determination of the electronic structure in WP2. Our results show that while the hole- and electron-like Fermi surface sheets originating from surface states have different areas, the bulk-band structure of WP2 is electron-hole-compensated in agreement with DFT. Furthermore, the detailed band structure is compatible with the presence of at least 4 temperature-independent Weyl points, confirming the topological nature of WP2 and its stability against lattice distortions.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy it is revealed that in the vicinity of optimal doping the electronic structure of La2-xSrxCuO4 cuprate undergoes an electronic reconstruction associated with a wave vector q_a=(pi, 0). The reconstructed Fermi surface and folded band are distinct to the shadow bands observed in BSCCO cuprates and in underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 with x <= 0.12, which shift the primary band along the zone diagonal direction. Furthermore the folded bands appear only with q_a=(pi, 0) vector, but not with q_b= (0, pi). We demonstrate that the absence of q_b reconstruction is not due to the matrix-element effects in the photoemission process, which indicates the four-fold symmetry is broken in the system.
  • Spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is used to reveal that a large spin polarization is observable in the bulk centrosymmetric transition metal dichalcogenide MoS2. It is found that the measured spin polarization can be reversed by changing the handedness of incident circularly-polarized light. Calculations based on a three-step model of photoemission show that the valley and layer-locked spin-polarized electronic states can be selectively addressed by circularly-polarized light, therefore providing a novel route to probe these hidden spin-polarized states in inversion-symmetric systems as predicted by Zhang et al. [Nature Physics 10, 387 (2014)].
  • In Ti-intercalated self-doped $1T$-TiSe$_2$ crystals, the charge density wave (CDW) superstructure induces two nonequivalent sites for Ti dopants. Recently, it has been shown that increasing Ti doping dramatically influences the CDW by breaking it into phase-shifted domains. Here, we report scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy experiments that reveal a dopant-site dependence of the CDW gap. Supported by density functional theory, we demonstrate that the loss of the longrange phase coherence introduces an imbalance in the intercalated-Ti site distribution and restrains the CDW gap closure. This local resilient behavior of the $1T$-TiSe$_2$ CDW reveals a novel mechanism between CDW and defects in mutual influence.
  • The impact of variable Ti self-doping on the 1T-TiSe2 charge density wave (CDW) is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy. Supported by density functional theory we show that agglomeration of intercalated-Ti atoms acts as preferential nucleation centers for the CDW that breaks up in phaseshifted CDW domains whose size directly depends on the intercalated-Ti concentration and which are separated by atomically-sharp phase boundaries. The close relationship between the diminution of the CDW domain size and the disappearance of the anomalous peak in the temperature dependent resistivity allows to draw a coherent picture of the 1T-TiSe2 CDW phase transition and its relation to excitons.
  • We report an angle-resolved photoemission study of the charge stripe ordered La$_{1.6-x}$Nd$_{0.4}$Sr$_x$CuO$_4$ system. A comparative and quantitative line shape analysis is presented as the system evolves from the overdoped regime into the charge ordered phase. On the overdoped side ($x=0.20$), a normal state anti-nodal spectral gap opens upon cooling below ~ 80 K. In this process spectral weight is preserved but redistributed to larger energies. A correlation between this spectral gap and electron scattering is found. A different lineshape is observed in the antinodal region of charge ordered Nd-LSCO $x=1/8$. Significant low-energy spectral weight appears to be lost. These observations are discussed in terms of spectral weight redistribution and gapping %of spectral weight originating from charge stripe ordering.
  • We employed {\it in-situ} pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to investigate the mechanism of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in NdNiO$_3$ (NNO) thin films, grown on NdGaO$_3$(110) and LaAlO$_3$(100) substrates. In the metallic phase, we observe three dimensional hole and electron Fermi surface (FS) pockets formed from strongly renormalized bands with well-defined quasiparticles. Upon cooling across the MIT in NNO/NGO sample, the quasiparticles lose coherence via a spectral weight transfer from near the Fermi level to localized states forming at higher binding energies. In the case of NNO/LAO, the bands are apparently shifted upward with an additional holelike pocket forming at the corner of the Brillouin zone. We find that the renormalization effects are strongly anisotropic and are stronger in NNO/NGO than NNO/LAO. Our study reveals that substrate-induced strain tunes the crystal field splitting, which changes the FS properties, nesting conditions, and spin-fluctuation strength, and thereby controls the MIT via the formation of an electronic order parameter with Q$_{AF}\sim$(1/4, 1/4, 1/4$\pm$$\delta$).
  • We report layer-resolved measurements of the \textit{unoccupied} electronic structure of ultrathin MgO films grown on Ag(001). The metal-induced gap states at the metal/oxide interface, the oxide band gap as well as a surface core exciton involving an image-potential state of the vacuum are revealed through resonant Auger spectroscopy of the Mg $KL_{23}L_{23}$ Auger transition. Our results demonstrate how to obtain new insights on \textit{empty} states at interfaces of metal-supported ultrathin oxide films.
  • The effects of electron-electron correlations on the low-energy electronic structure and their relationship with unconventional superconductivity are central aspects in the research on the iron-based pnictide superconductors. Here we use soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES) to study how electronic correlations evolve in different chemically substituted iron pnictides. We find that correlations are intrinsically related to the effective filling of the correlated orbitals, rather than to the filling obtained by valence counting. Combined density functional theory (DFT) and dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) calculations capture these effects, reproducing the experimentally observed trend in the correlation strength. The occupation-driven trend in the electronic correlation reported in our work supports the recently proposed connection between cuprate and pnictides phase diagrams.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we show that the recently-discovered surface state on SrTiO$_{3}$ consists of non-degenerate $t_{2g}$ states with different dimensional characters. While the $d_{xy}$ bands have quasi-2D dispersions with weak $k_{z}$ dependence, the lifted $d_{xz}$/$d_{yz}$ bands show 3D dispersions that differ significantly from bulk expectations and signal that electrons associated with those orbitals permeate the near-surface region. Like their more 2D counterparts, the size and character of the $d_{xz}$/$d_{yz}$ Fermi surface components are essentially the same for different sample preparations. Irradiating SrTiO$_{3}$ in ultrahigh vacuum is one method observed so far to induce the "universal" surface metallic state. We reveal that during this process, changes in the oxygen valence band spectral weight that coincide with the emergence of surface conductivity are disproportionate to any change in the total intensity of the O $1s$ core level spectrum. This signifies that the formation of the metallic surface goes beyond a straightforward chemical doping scenario and occurs in conjunction with profound changes in the initial states and/or spatial distribution of near-$E_{F}$ electrons in the surface region.
  • We performed a high energy resolution ARPES investigation of over-doped Ba0.1K0.9Fe2As2 with T_c= 9 K. The Fermi surface topology of this material is similar to that of KFe2As2 and differs from that of slightly less doped Ba0.3K0.7Fe2As2, implying that a Lifshitz transition occurred between x=0.7 and x=0.9. Albeit for a vertical node found at the tip of the emerging off-M-centered Fermi surface pocket lobes, the superconducting gap structure is similar to that of Ba0.3K0.7Fe2As2, suggesting that the paring interaction is not driven by the Fermi surface topology.
  • Novel properties arising at interfaces between transition metal oxides, particularly the conductivity at the interface of LaAlO3 (LAO) and SrTiO3 (STO) band insulators, have generated new paradigms, challenges, and opportunities in condensed matter physics. Conventional transport measurements have established that intrinsic conductivity appears in LAO/STO interfaces when the LAO film matches or exceeds a critical thickness of 4 unit cells (uc). Recently, a number of experiments raise important questions about the role of the LAO film, the influence of photons, and the effective differences between vacuum/STO and LAO/STO, both above and below the standard critical thickness. Here, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in situ prepared samples, as well as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), we study how the metallic STO surface state evolves during the growth of a crystalline LAO film. In all the samples, the character of the conduction bands, their carrier densities, the Ti3+ crystal fields, and the responses to photon irradiation bear strong similarities. However, LAO/STO interfaces exhibit intrinsic instability toward in-plane folding of the Fermi surface at and above the 4-uc thickness threshold. This ordering distinguishes these heterostructures from bare STO and sub-critical-thickness LAO/STO and coincides with the onset of unique properties such as magnetism and built-in conductivity.
  • We performed a high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on superconducting (SC) Tl$_{0.63}$K$_{0.37}$Fe$_{1.78}$Se$_2$ ($T_c=29$ K) in the whole Brillouin zone (BZ). In addition to a nearly isotropic $\sim$ 8.2 meV 2-dimensional (2D) SC gap ($2\Delta/k_BT_c\sim7$) on quasi-2D electron Fermi surfaces (FSs) located around M$(\pi,0,0)$-A$(\pi,0,\pi)$, we observe a $\sim 6.2$ meV isotropic SC gap ($2\Delta/k_BT_c\sim5$) on the Z-centered electron FS that rules out any d-wave pairing symmetry and rather favors an s-wave symmetry. All isotropic SC gap amplitudes can be fit by a single gap function derived from a local strong coupling approach suggesting an enhancement of the next-next neighbor exchange interaction in the ferrochalcogenide superconductors.
  • Using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), it is revealed that the low-energy electronic excitation spectra of highly underdoped superconducting and non-superconducting La(2-x)SrxCuO4 cuprates are gapped along the entire underlying Fermi surface at low temperatures. We show how the gap function evolves to a d(x2-y2) form as increasing temperature or doping, consistent with the vast majority of ARPES studies of cuprates. Our results provide essential information for uncovering the symmetry of the order parameter(s) in strongly underdoped cuprates, which is a prerequisite for understanding the pairing mechanism and how superconductivity emerges from a Mott insulator.
  • We have performed detailed studies of the temperature evolution of the electronic structure in Ba(Fe(1-x)Ru(x))2As2 using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES). Surprisingly, we find that the binding energy of both hole and electron bands changes significantly with temperature in pure and Ru substituted samples. The hole and electron pockets are well nested at low temperature in unsubstituted (BaFe2As2) samples, which likely drives the spin density wave (SDW) and resulting antiferromagnetic order. Upon warming, this nesting is degraded as the hole pocket shrinks and the electron pocket expands. Our results demonstrate that the temperature dependent nesting may play an important role in driving the antiferromagnetic/paramagnetic phase transition.
  • We present a soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES) study of the stoichiometric pnictide superconductor LaRu2P2. The observed electronic structure is in good agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. However, it is significantly different from its counterpart in high-temperature superconducting Fe-pnictides. In particular the bandwidth renormalization present in the Fe-pnictides (~2 - 3) is negligible in LaRu2P2 even though the mass enhancement is similar in both systems. Our results suggest that the superconductivity in LaRu2P2 has a different origin with respect to the iron pnictides. Finally we demonstrate that the increased probing depth of SX-ARPES, compared to the widely used ultraviolet ARPES, is essential in determining the bulk electronic structure in the experiment.
  • We present an angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy study of YBa2Cu3O7-delta films in situ grown by pulsed laser deposition. We have successfully produced underdoped surfaces with ordered oxygen vacancies within the CuO chains resulting in a clear ortho-II band folding of the Fermi surface. This indicates that order within the CuO chains affects the electronic properties of the CuO2 planes. Our results highlight the importance of having not only the correct surface carrier concentration, but also a very well ordered and clean surface in order that photoemission data on this compound be representative of the bulk.
  • The iron-pnictide superconductors have a layered structureformed by stacks of FeAs planes from which the superconductivity originates. Given the multiband and quasi three-dimensional \cite{3D_SC} (3D) electronic structure of these high-temperature superconductors, knowledge of the quasi-3D superconducting (SC) gap is essential for understanding the superconducting mechanism. By using the \KZ-capability of angle-resolved photoemission, we completely determined the SC gap on all five Fermi surfaces (FSs) in three dimensions on \BKFAOP samples. We found a marked \KZ dispersion of the SC gap, which can derive only from interlayer pairing. Remarkably, the SC energy gaps can be described by a single 3D gap function with two energy scales characterizing the strengths of intralayer $\Delta_1$ and interlayer $\Delta_2$ pairing. The anisotropy ratio $\Delta_2/\Delta_1$, determined from the gap function, is close to the c-axis anisotropy ratio of the magnetic exchange coupling $J_c/J_{ab}$ in the parent compound \cite{NeutronParent}. The ubiquitous gap function for all the 3D FSs reveals that pairing is short-ranged and strongly constrain the possible pairing force in the pnictides. A suitable candidate could arise from short-range antiferromagnetic fluctuations.
  • Angle-resolved photoemission on underdoped La$_{1.895}$Sr$_{0.105}$CuO$_4$ reveals that in the pseudogap phase, the dispersion has two branches located above and below the Fermi level with a minimum at the Fermi momentum. This is characteristic of the Bogoliubov dispersion in the superconducting state. We also observe that the superconducting and pseudogaps have the same d-wave form with the same amplitude. Our observations provide direct evidence for preformed Cooper pairs, implying that the pseudogap phase is a precursor to superconductivity.