• IR spectroscopy in the range 12-230 micron with the SPace IR telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will reveal the physical processes that govern the formation and evolution of galaxies and black holes through cosmic time, bridging the gap between the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) at shorter wavelengths and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at longer wavelengths. SPICA, with its 2.5-m telescope actively-cooled to below 8K, will obtain the first spectroscopic determination, in the mid-IR rest-frame, of both the star-formation rate and black hole accretion rate histories of galaxies, reaching lookback times of 12 Gyr, for large statistically significant samples. Densities, temperatures, radiation fields and gas-phase metallicities will be measured in dust-obscured galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN), sampling a large range in mass and luminosity, from faint local dwarf galaxies to luminous quasars in the distant Universe. AGN and starburst feedback and feeding mechanisms in distant galaxies will be uncovered through detailed measurements of molecular and atomic line profiles. SPICA's large-area deep spectrophotometric surveys will provide mid-IR spectra and continuum fluxes for unbiased samples of tens of thousands of galaxies, out to redshifts of z~6. Furthermore, SPICA spectroscopy will uncover the most luminous galaxies in the first few hundred million years of the Universe, through their characteristic dust and molecular hydrogen features.
  • In the paradigm of magnetic launching of astrophysical jets, instabilities in the MHD flow are a good candidate to convert the Poynting flux into the kinetic energy of the plasma. If the magnetised plasma fills the almost entire space, the jet is unstable to helical perturbations of its body. However, the growth rate of these modes is suppressed when the poloidal component of the magnetic field has a vanishing gradient, which may be the actual case for a realistic configuration. Here we show that, if the magnetised plasma is confined into a limited region by the pressure of some external medium, the velocity shear at the contact surface excites unstable modes which can affect a significant fraction of the jet's body. We find that when the Lorentz factor of the jet is $\Gamma\sim10$ ($\Gamma\sim 100$), these perturbations typically develop after propagating along the jet for tens (hundreds) of jet's radii. Surface modes may therefore play an important role in converting the energy of the jet from the Poynting flux to the kinetic energy of the plasma, particularly in AGN. The scaling of the dispersion relation with (i) the angular velocity of the field lines and (ii) the sound speed in the confining gas is discussed.
  • We study the CO line luminosity ($L_{\rm CO}$), the shape of the CO Spectral Line Energy Distribution (SLED), and the value of the CO-to-$\rm H_2$ conversion factor in galaxies in the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). To this aim, we construct a model that simultaneously takes into account the radiative transfer and the clumpy structure of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) where the CO lines are excited. We then use it to post-process state-of-the-art zoomed, high resolution ($30\, \rm{pc}$), cosmological simulation of a main-sequence ($M_{*}\approx10^{10}\, \rm{M_{\odot}}$, $SFR\approx 100\,\rm{M_{\odot}\, yr^{-1}}$) galaxy, "Alth{\ae}a", at $z\approx6$. We find that the CO emission traces the inner molecular disk ($r\approx 0.5 \,\rm{kpc}$) of Alth{\ae}a with the peak of the CO surface brightness co-located with that of the [CII] 158$\rm \mu m$ emission. Its $L_{\rm CO(1-0)}=10^{4.85}\, \rm{L_{\odot}}$ is comparable to that observed in local galaxies with similar stellar mass. The high ($\Sigma_{gas} \approx 220\, \rm M_{\odot}\, pc^{-2}$) gas surface density in Alth{\ae}a, its large Mach number (\mach$\approx 30$), and the warm kinetic temperature ($T_{k}\approx 45 \, \rm K$) of GMCs yield a CO SLED peaked at the CO(7-6) transition, i.e. at relatively high-$J$, and a CO-to-$\rm H_2$ conversion factor $\alpha_{\rm CO}\approx 1.5 \, \rm M_{\odot} \rm (K\, km\, s^{-1}\, pc^2)^{-1} $ lower than that of the Milky Way. The ALMA observing time required to detect (resolve) at 5$\sigma$ the CO(7-6) line from galaxies similar to Alth{\ae}a is $\approx13$ h ($\approx 38$ h).
  • Long-duration, spectrally-soft Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are associated with Type Ic Core Collapse (CC) Supernovae (SNe), and thus arise from the death of massive stars. In the collapsar model, the jet launched by the central engine must bore its way out of the progenitor star before it can produce a GRB. Most of these jets do not break out, and are instead "choked" inside the star, as the central-engine activity time, $t_{\rm e}$, is not long enough. Modelling the long-soft GRB duration distribution assuming a power-law distribution for their central-engine activity times, $\propto t_{\rm e}^{-\alpha}$ for $t_{\rm e}>t_{\rm b}$, we find a steep distribution ($\alpha\sim4$) and a typical GRB jet breakout time of $t_{\rm b}\sim 60\text{ s}$ in the star's frame. The latter suggests the presence of a low-density, extended envelope surrounding the progenitor star, similar to that previously inferred for low-luminosity GRBs. Extrapolating the range of validity of this power law below what is directly observable, to $t_{\rm e}<t_{\rm b}$, by only a factor of $\sim$4-5 produces enough events to account for all Type Ib/c SNe. Such extrapolation is necessary to avoid fine-tuning the distribution of central engine activity times with the breakout time, which are presumably unrelated. We speculate that central engines launching relativistic jets may operate in all Type Ib/c SNe. In this case, the existence of a common central engine would imply that (i) the jet may significantly contribute to the energy of the SN; (ii) various observational signatures, like the asphericity of the explosion, could be directly related to jet's interaction with the star.
  • Core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of Types Ib and Ic arise from hydrogen-stripped stars, while the latter are also stripped of their helium. Both SN types have a similar temporal evolution, suggesting broadly similar progenitors. However, while some Ic SNe are associated with relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), no GRB has yet been found in association with Type Ib SNe. Here we find that, even if GRB-like central engines operate in both SNe Ib and Ic, different properties of their envelopes may accommodate this potential tension. In particular, we focus on the case of a low-mass, extended envelope surrounding the progenitor star (as produced, for example, by strong mass losses prior to explosion). If the envelopes of Type Ib SNe are sufficiently massive ($M_{\rm ext}\sim(0.3-1)M_\odot$) and extended ($R_{\rm ext}\sim 10^{13}\text{ cm}$), we show that (i) GRB-like jets cannot break out of the star; (ii) the SN light curve is compatible with current observations. Different envelope properties of Type Ib SNe with respect to (at least some) Type Ic SNe may be connected to the presence of a helium layer surrounding the star.
  • In the paradigm of magnetic acceleration of relativistic jets, one of the key points is identifying a viable mechanism to convert the Poynting flux into the kinetic energy of the plasma beyond equipartition. A promising candidate is the kink instability, which deforms the body of the jet through helical perturbations. Since the detailed structure of real jets is unknown, we explore a large family of cylindrical, force-free equilibria to get robust conclusions. We find that the growth rate of the instability depends primarily on two parameters: (i) the gradient of the poloidal magnetic field; (ii) the Lorentz factor of the perturbation, which is closely related to the velocity of the plasma. We provide a simple fitting formula for the growth rate of the instability. As a tentative application, we use our results to interpret the dynamics of the jet in the nearby active galaxy M87. We show that the kink instability becomes non-linear at a distance from the central black hole comparable to where the jet stops accelerating. Hence (at least for this object), the kink instability of the jet is a good candidate to drive the transition from a Poynting-dominated to a kinetic-energy-dominated flow.
  • We investigate the impact of sinks of ionizing radiation on the reionization-era 21-cm signal, focusing on 1-point statistics. We consider sinks in both the intergalactic medium and inside galaxies. At a fixed filling factor of HII regions, sinks will have two main effects on the 21-cm morphology: (i) as inhomogeneous absorbers of ionizing photons they result in smaller and more widespread cosmic HII patches; and (ii) as reservoirs of neutral gas they contribute a non-zero 21-cm signal in otherwise ionized regions. Both effects damp the contrast between neutral and ionized patches during reionization, making detection of the epoch of reionization with 21-cm interferometry more challenging. Here we systematically investigate these effects using the latest semi-numerical simulations. We find that sinks dramatically suppress the peak in the redshift evolution of the variance, corresponding to the midpoint of reionization. As previously predicted, skewness changes sign at midpoint, but the fluctuations in the residual HI suppress a late-time rise. Furthermore, large levels of residual HI dramatically alter the evolution of the variance, skewness and power spectrum from that seen at lower levels. In general, the evolution of the large-scale modes provides a better, cleaner, higher signal-to-noise probe of reionization.