• July 10, 2018 astro-ph.HE
    We present the results of our power spectral density analysis for the BL Lac object OJ\,287, utilizing the {\it Fermi}-LAT survey at high-energy $\gamma$-rays, {\it Swift}-XRT in X-rays, several ground-based telescopes and the {\it Kepler} satellite in the optical, and radio telescopes at GHz frequencies. The light curves are modeled in terms of continuous-time auto-regressive moving average (CARMA) processes. Owing to the inclusion of the {\it Kepler} data, we were able to construct \emph{for the first time} the optical variability power spectrum of a blazar without any gaps across $\sim6$ dex in temporal frequencies. Our analysis reveals that the radio power spectra are of a colored-noise type on timescales ranging from tens of years down to months, with no evidence for breaks or other spectral features. The overall optical power spectrum is also consistent with a colored noise on the variability timescales ranging from 117 years down to hours, with no hints of any quasi-periodic oscillations. The X-ray power spectrum resembles the radio and optical power spectra on the analogous timescales ranging from tens of years down to months. Finally, the $\gamma$-ray power spectrum is noticeably different from the radio, optical, and X-ray power spectra of the source: we have detected a characteristic relaxation timescale in the {\it Fermi}-LAT data, corresponding to $\sim 150$\,days, such that on timescales longer than this, the power spectrum is consistent with uncorrelated (white) noise, while on shorter variability timescales there is correlated (colored) noise.
  • A recent study of a small sample of X-ray binaries (XRBs) suggests a significant softening of spectra of neutron star (NS) binaries as compared to black hole (BH) binaries in the luminosity range 10$^{34}$ - 10$^{37}$ erg/s. This softening is quantified as an anticorrelation between the spectral index and the 0.5 - 10 keV X-ray luminosity. We extend the study to significantly lower luminosities (i.e., $\sim$ a few $\times$ $10^{30}$ erg/s) for a larger sample of XRBs. We find evidence for a significant anticorrelation between the spectral index and the luminosity for a group of NS binaries in the luminosity range 10$^{32}$ to 10$^{33}$ erg/s. Our analysis suggests a steep slope for the correlation i.e., -2.12 $\pm$ 0.63. In contrast, BH binaries do not exhibit the same behavior. We examine the possible dichotomy between NS and BH binaries in terms of a Comptonization model that assumes a feedback mechanism between an optically thin hot corona and an optically thick cool source of soft photons. We gauge the NS-BH dichotomy by comparing the extracted corona temperatures, Compton-y parameters and the Comptonization amplification factors: The mean temperature of the NS group is found to be significantly lower than the equivalent temperature for the BH group. The extracted Compton-y parameters and the amplification factors follow the theoretically predicted relation with the spectral index.
  • OJ287 is a quasi-periodic quasar with roughly 12 year optical cycles. It displays prominent outbursts which are predictable in a binary black hole model. The model predicted a major optical outburst in December 2015. We found that the outburst did occur within the expected time range, peaking on 2015 December 5 at magnitude 12.9 in the optical R-band. Based on Swift/XRT satellite measurements and optical polarization data, we find that it included a major thermal component. Its timing provides an accurate estimate for the spin of the primary black hole, chi = 0.313 +- 0.01. The present outburst also confirms the established general relativistic properties of the system such as the loss of orbital energy to gravitational radiation at the 2 % accuracy level and it opens up the possibility of testing the black hole no-hair theorem with a 10 % accuracy during the present decade.
  • We present the spectral analysis of an 87~ks \emph{XMM-Newton} observation of Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Of the approximately 35 robust X-ray source detections, we focus our attention on the brightest of these sources, for which we report X-ray and multiwavelength parameters. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with AGN, few of them possess characteristics of LMXBs and CVs. Our analysis puts constraints on population of X-ray sources with $L_X>3\times10^{33}$~erg~s$^{-1}$ in Draco suggesting that there are no actively accreting BH and NS binaries. However, we find 4 sources that could be LMXBs/CVs in quiescent state associated with Draco. We also place constraints on the central black hole luminosity and on a dark matter decay signal around 3.5~keV.
  • For a sample of Swift and Fermi GRBs, we show that the minimum variability timescale and the spectral lag of the prompt emission is related to the bulk Lorentz factor in a complex manner: For small $\Gamma$'s, the variability timescale exhibits a shallow (plateau) region. For large $\Gamma$'s, the variability timescale declines steeply as a function of $\Gamma$ ($\delta T\propto\Gamma^{-4.05\pm0.64}$). Evidence is also presented for an intriguing correlation between the peak times, t$_p$, of the afterglow emission and the prompt emission variability timescale.
  • We present multiwavelength observations of the afterglow of GRB 130427A, the brightest (in total fluence) gamma-ray burst of the past 29 years. Optical spectroscopy from Gemini-North reveals the redshift of the GRB to be z=0.340, indicating that its unprecedented brightness is primarily the result of its relatively close proximity to Earth; the intrinsic luminosities of both the GRB and its afterglow are not extreme in comparison to other bright GRBs. We present a large suite of multiwavelength observations spanning from 300 s to 130 d after the burst and demonstrate that the afterglow shows relatively simple, smooth evolution at all frequencies with no significant late-time flaring or rebrightening activity. The entire dataset from 1 GHz to 10 GeV can be modeled as synchrotron emission from a combination of reverse and forward shocks in good agreement with the standard afterglow model, providing strong support to the applicability of the underlying theory and clarifying the nature of the GeV emission observed to last for minutes to hours following other very bright GRBs. A tenuous, wind-stratified circumburst density profile is required by the observations, suggesting a massive-star progenitor with a low mass-loss rate, perhaps due to low metallicity. GRBs similar in nature to GRB 130427A, inhabiting low-density media and exhibiting strong reverse shocks, are probably not uncommon but may have been difficult to recognize in the past due to their relatively faint late-time radio emission; more such events should be found in abundance by the new generation of sensitive radio and millimeter instruments.
  • Curvature effects in Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have long been a source of considerable interest. In a collimated relativistic GRB jet, photons that are off-axis relative to the observer arrive at later times than on-axis photons and are also expected to be spectrally softer. In this work, we invoke a relatively simple kinematic two-shell collision model for a uniform jet profile and compare its predictions to GRB prompt-emission data for observations that have been attributed to curvature effects such as the peak-flux--peak-frequency relation, i.e., the relation between the $\nu$F$_\nu$ flux and the spectral peak, E$_{pk}$ in the decay phase of a GRB pulse, and spectral lags. In addition, we explore the behavior of pulse widths with energy. We present the case of the single-pulse Fermi GRB 110920, as a test for the predictions of the model against observations.
  • We use a wavelet technique to investigate the time variations in the light curves from a sample of GRBs detected by Fermi and Swift. We focus primarily on the behavior of the flaring region of Swift-XRT light curves in order to explore connections between variability time scales and pulse parameters (such as rise and decay times, widths, strengths, and separation distributions) and spectral lags. Tight correlations between some of these temporal features suggest a common origin for the production of X-ray flares and the prompt emission.
  • From a sample of GRBs detected by the $Fermi$ and $Swift$ missions, we have extracted the minimum variability time scales for temporal structures in the light curves associated with the prompt emission and X-ray flares. A comparison of this variability time scale with pulse parameters such as rise times,determined via pulse-fitting procedures, and spectral lags, extracted via the cross-correlation function (CCF), indicate a tight correlation between these temporal features for both the X-ray flares and the prompt emission. These correlations suggests a common origin for the production of X-ray flares and the prompt emission in GRBs.
  • We have investigated the time variations in the light curves from a sample of long and short Fermi/GBM Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) using an impartial wavelet analysis. The results indicate that in the source frame, the variability time scales for long bursts differ from that for short bursts, that variabilities on the order of a few milliseconds are not uncommon, and that an intriguing relationship exists between the minimum variability time and the burst duration.
  • We present results from a study of the non-nuclear discrete sources in a sample of three nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 4395, NGC 4736, and NGC 4258) based on XMM-Newton archival data supplemented with Chandra data for spectral and timing analyses. A total of 75 X-ray sources has been detected within the D25 regions of the target galaxies. The large collecting area of XMM-Newton makes the statistics sufficient to obtain spectral fitting for 16 (about 20%) of these sources. Compiling the extensive archival exposures available, we were able to obtain the detailed spectral shapes of diverse classes of point sources. We have also studied temporal properties of these luminous sources. 11 of them are found to show short-term (less than 80 ks) variation while 8 of them show long-term variation within factors of ~ 2 to 5 during a time interval of ~ 2 to 12 years. Timing analysis provides strong evidence that most of these sources are accreting X-ray binary (XRB) systems. One source that has properties different than others was suspected to be a Supernova Remnant (SNR), and our follow-up optical observation confirmed it. Our results indicate that sources within the three nearby galaxies are showing a variety of source populations, including several Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources (ULXs), X-ray binaries (XRBs), transients together with a Super Soft Source (SSS) and a background Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) candidate.
  • We present a direct link between the minimum variability time scales extracted through a wavelet decomposition and the rise times of the shortest pulses extracted via fits of 34 Fermi GBM GRB light curves comprised of 379 pulses. Pulses used in this study were fitted with log-normal functions whereas the wavelet technique used employs a multiresolution analysis that does not rely on identifying distinct pulses. By applying a corrective filter to published data fitted with pulses we demonstrate agreement between these two independent techniques and offer a method for distinguishing signal from noise.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T90 ~ 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z= 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray, which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. By fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/gamma-ray spectra, it traces the gamma-ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + SSC scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (~ 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise (alpha ~ 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow lightcurves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high quality prompt emission and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball shock model to extract valuable information about the GRB including the radiation mechanism, radius of prompt emission R, initial Lorentz factor of the outflow, the composition of the ejecta, as well as the collimation angle and the total energy budget.
  • We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system that will coordinate ground-based optical telescopes to cover the Fermi GBM Error Circle (EC). The aim of the system is to localize GBM detected GRBs and facilitate multi-wavelength follow-up from space and ground. This system will optimize the observing locations in the GBM EC based on individual telescope location, Field of View (FoV) and sensitivity. The proposed system will coordinate GBM EC scanning by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project are presented.
  • Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most dramatic examples of massive stellar deaths, usually as- sociated with supernovae (Woosley et al. 2006). They release ultra-relativistic jets producing non-thermal emission through synchrotron radiation as they interact with the surrounding medium (Zhang et al. 2004). Here we report observations of the peculiar GRB 101225A (the "Christmas burst"). Its gamma-ray emission was exceptionally long and followed by a bright X-ray transient with a hot thermal component and an unusual optical counterpart. During the first 10 days, the optical emission evolved as an expanding, cooling blackbody after which an additional component, consistent with a faint supernova, emerged. We determine its distance to 1.6 Gpc by fitting the spectral-energy distribution and light curve of the optical emission with a GRB-supernova template. Deep optical observations may have revealed a faint, unresolved host galaxy. Our proposed progenitor is a helium star-neutron star merger that underwent a common envelope phase expelling its hydrogen envelope. The resulting explosion created a GRB-like jet which gets thermalized by interacting with the dense, previously ejected material and thus creating the observed black-body, until finally the emission from the supernova dominated. An alternative explanation is a minor body falling onto a neutron star in the Galaxy (Campana et al. 2011).
  • Spectral lag, which is defined as the difference in time of arrival of high and low energy photons, is a common feature in Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Previous investigations have shown a correlation between this lag and the isotropic peak luminosity for long duration bursts. However, most of the previous investigations used lags extracted in the observer-frame only. In this work (based on a sample of 43 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts), we present an analysis of the lag-luminosity relation in the GRB source-frame. Our analysis indicates a higher degree of correlation -0.82 +/- 0.05 (chance probability of ~ 5.5 x 10^-5) between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity, Liso, with a best-fit power-law index of -1.2 +/- 0.2, such that Liso proportional to lag^-1.2. In addition, there is an anti-correlation between the source-frame spectral lag and the source-frame peak energy of the burst spectrum, E_pk(1+z).
  • We have identified nine new SNR candidates in M74 with [S II]/H$\alpha$ $\geq$ 0.4 as the basic criterion. We obtain [S II]/H$\alpha$ ratio in the range from 0.40 to 0.91 and H$\alpha$ intensities from 2.8 $\times$ $10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ to 1.7 $\times$ $10^{-14}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. We also present spectral follow-up observations of the SNR candidates and can confirm only three of them (SNR2, SNR3, and SNR5). The lack of confirmation for the rest might be due to the contamination by the nearby H II emission regions as well as due to the inaccurate positioning of the long slit on these objects. In addition, we search the $Chandra$ Observatory archival data for the X-ray counterparts to the optically identified candidates. We find positional coincidence with only three SNR candidates, SNR1, SNR2, and SNR8. The spectrum of SNR2 yields a shock temperature of 10.8 keV with an ionization timescale of 1.6 $\times$ 10$^{10}$ s cm$^{-3}$ indicating a relatively young remnant in an early Sedov phase which is not supported by our optical wavelength analysis. Given the high luminosity of 10$^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum, we favor an Ultra Luminous X-ray Source interpretation for this source associated with an SNR. We calculate an X-ray flux upper limit of 9.0 $\times$ $10^{-15}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ for the rest of the SNRs including spectroscopically identified SNR3 and SNR5.
  • Results of modeling the spectra of two supernovae SN 2008D and SN 2006aj related to the X-ray flash XRF 080109 and gamma-ray burst GRB / XRF 060218, respectively, are studied. The spectra were obtained with the 6-meter BTA telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences in 6.48 and 27.61 days after the explosion of SN 2008D, and in 2.55 and 3.55 days after the explosion of SN 2006aj. The spectra were interpreted in the Sobolev approximation with the SYNOW code. An assumption about the presence of envelopes around the progenitor stars is confirmed by an agreement between the velocities of lines interpreted as hydrogen and helium, and the empiric power-law velocity drop with time for the envelopes of classic core-collapse supernovae. Detection of a P Cyg profile of the H-beta line in the spectra of optical afterglows of GRBs can be a determinative argument in favor of this hypothesis.
  • We present the results of an optical search for supernova remnants (SNRs) in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2903. Interference filter images and spectral data were taken in March 2005 with the f/7.7 1.5 m Russian Turkish Telescope (RTT150) at TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG). Spectral data were obtained with the 6 m BTA (Bolshoi Azimuthal Telescope, Russia). We used the SNR identification criterion that consists of constructing the continuum-subtracted H$\alpha$ and continuum-subtracted [SII]$\lambda$$\lambda$6716,6731 images and their ratios. Five SNR candidates were identified in NGC 2903 with [SII]/H$\alpha$ ratios ranging from 0.41 - 0.74 and H$\alpha$ intensities ranging from 9.4$\times10^{-15}$ to 1.7$\times10^{-14}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. This work represents the first identification of SNRs by an optical survey in NGC 2903. We present the spectrum of one of the bright candidates and derive an [SII]/H$\alpha$ emission line ratio of 0.42 for this source. In addition, the weak [OIII]$\lambda$5007/H$\beta$ emission line ratio in the spectrum of this SNR indicates an old oxygen-deficient remnant with a low propagation velocity.
  • In BTA spectra of the supernova SN2006aj, identified with the X-ray flash (XRF) and gamma-ray burst XRF/GRB060218/SN2006aj, we detected details interpreted as hydrogen lines, which is a sign of stellar-wind envelope around a massive progenitor star of the gamma-ray burst. Results of modeling two early spectra obtained with the BTA in 2.55 and 3.55 days after the explosion of Type Ic supernova SN2006aj (z=0.0331) are presented. The spectra were modeled in the Sobolev approximation with the SYNOW code (Branch et al. 2001; Elmhamdi et al. 2006). In the spectra of the optical afterglow of the X-ray flash XRF/GRB060218 we detected spectral features interpreted as (1) the H_alpha PCyg profile for the velocity 33000 km s$^{-1}$ -- a wide and almost unnoticeable deformation of continuum in the range of $\simeq5600 - 6600\AA$ for the first epoch (2.55 days) and (2) a part (``remnant'') of the H_alpha PCyg profile in absorption blueshifted by 24000 km s$^{-1}$ -- a wide spectral feature with a minimum at $\simeq6100\AA$ (the rest wavelength) for the second epoch (3.55 days). Taking into consideration early BTA observations and spectra obtained with other telescopes (ESO Lick, ESO VLT, NOT) before 2006 Feb. 23 UT, it can be said that we observe evolution of optical spectra of Type Ic core-collapse supernova SN 2006aj during {\it transition} from the short phase related to the shock breakout to outer layers of the stellar-wind envelope to spectra of the phase of increasing brightness corresponding to radioactive heating. Signs of hydrogen in spectra of the gamma-ray burst afterglow were detected for the first time.