• DXL (Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to quantify and characterize the contribution of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) to the Diffuse X-ray Background and study the properties of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). Based on the results from the DXL mission, we quantified and removed the contribution of SWCX to the diffuse X-ray background measured by the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). The "cleaned" maps were used to investigate the physical properties of the LHB. Assuming thermal ionization equilibrium, we measured a highly uniform temperature distributed around kT=0.097 keV+/-0.013 keV (FWHM)+/-0.006 keV (systematic). We also generated a thermal emission measure map and used it to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the LHB which we found to be in good agreement with the structure of the local cavity measured from dust and gas.
  • DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to estimate the contribution of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) to the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) and to help determine the properties of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). The detectors are large-area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response similar to that of the PSPC used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky viewed from quite different vantage points in the Solar system and the assumption of approximate isotropy for the Solar wind allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all 6 RASS bands (R1-R7, excepting R3). We find that the SWCX contribution at l=140 deg, b=0 deg, where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane is 33%+-6% (statistical)+-12%(systematic) for R1, 44%+-\%+-5% for R2, 18%+-12%+-11% for R4, 14%+-11%+-9% for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7 bands. Reliable models for the distribution of neutral H and He in the Solar system permit estimation of the contribution of interplanetary SWCX emission over the the whole sky and correction of the RASS maps. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 26%+-6%+-13% for R1, 30%+-4%+-4% for R2, 8%+-5%+-5% for R4, 6%+-4%+-4% for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7.
  • We analyzed data from a shadow observation of the high density molecular cloud MBM36 (l~4{\deg}, b~35{\deg}) with Suzaku. MBM36 is located in a region that emits relatively weakly in the 3/4~keV band, compared to the surrounding NPS/Loop 1 structure and the Galactic Bulge. The contrast between a high and low density targets in the MBM36 area allows one to separate the local and distant contributors to the Soft Diffuse X-ray Background, providing a much better characterization of the individual components compared to single pointing observations. We identify two non-local thermal components, one at kT~0.12 keV and one at kT~0.29keV. The colder component matches well with models of emission from the higher latitude region of the Galactic Bulge. The emission of the warmer component is in agreement with models predicting that the NPS is due to a hypershell from the center of the Milky Way. Geometrical and pressure calculations rule out a nearby bubble as responsible for the emission associate with the NPS. Any Galactic Halo/CircumGalactic Halo emission, if present, is outshined by the other components. We also report an excess emission around 0.9~keV, likely due to an overabundance of NeIX.
  • Looking at the region connecting two clusters is a promising way to identify and study the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. Observations show that the spectrum of the bridge between A3556 and A3558 has a stronger soft X-ray emission than the nearby region. Suzaku observations could not discriminate the origin of the extra emission. In this work we analyze a dedicated Chandra observation of the same target to identify point sources and characterize the background emission in the bridge. We find that the count number of the point sources is much higher than average field population (using CDFS~4~Ms as a reference). Moreover, the shape of the cumulative distribution resembles that of galaxy distribution suggesting that the point sources are galaxies in a filament. The Suzaku extra emission is well explained by the high abundance of point sources identified by Chandra. Furthermore, we used optical/IR observations of point sources in the same field to estimate the density of the putative filament as rho~150 rho_b$, below Suzaku sensitivity.
  • The Solar neighborhood is the closest and most easily studied sample of the Galactic interstellar medium, an understanding of which is essential for models of star formation and galaxy evolution. Observations of an unexpectedly intense diffuse flux of easily-absorbed 1/4 keV X rays, coupled with the discovery that interstellar space within ~100 pc of the Sun is almost completely devoid of cool absorbing gas led to a picture of a "local cavity" filled with X-ray emitting hot gas dubbed the local hot bubble. This model was recently upset by suggestions that the emission could instead be produced readily within the solar system by heavy solar wind ions charge exchanging with neutral H and He in interplanetary space, potentially removing the major piece of evidence for the existence of million-degree gas within the Galactic disk. Here we report results showing that the total solar wind charge exchange contribution is 40% +/- 5% (stat) +/- 5% (sys) of the 1/4 keV flux in the Galactic plane. The fact that the measured flux is not dominated by charge exchange supports the notion of a million-degree hot bubble of order 100 pc extent surrounding the Sun.
  • We develop an estimator for the correlation function which, in the ensemble average, returns the shape of the correlation function, even for signals that have significant correlations on the scale of the survey region. Our estimator is general and works in any number of dimensions. We develop versions of the estimator for both diffuse and discrete signals. As an application, we examine Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray background measurements. These include a realistic, spatially-inhomogeneous population of spurious detector events. We discuss applying the estimator to the averaging of correlation functions evaluated on several small fields, and to other cosmological applications.
  • J.W. den Herder, L. Piro, T. Ohashi, C. Kouveliotou, D.H. Hartmann, J.S. Kaastra, L. Amati, M.I. Andersen, M. Arnaud, J-L. Attéia, S. Bandler, M. Barbera, X. Barcons, S. Barthelmy, S. Basa, S. Basso, M. Boer, E. Branchini, G. Branduardi-Raymont, S. Borgani, A. Boyarsky, G. Brunetti, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, D. Burrows, N. Butler, S. Campana, E. Caroli, M. Ceballos, F. Christensen, E. Churazov, A. Comastri, L. Colasanti, R. Cole, R. Content, A. Corsi, E. Costantini, P. Conconi, G. Cusumano, J. de Plaa, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, S. Di Cosimo, M. De Pasquale, R. Doriese, S. Ettori, P. Evans, Y. Ezoe, L. Ferrari, H. Finger, T. Figueroa-Feliciano, P. Friedrich, R. Fujimoto, A. Furuzawa, J. Fynbo, F. Gatti, M. Galeazzi, N. Gehrels, B. Gendre, G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghisellini, M. Gilfanov, P. Giommi, M. Girardi, J. Grindlay, M. Cocchi, O. Godet, M. Guedel, F. Haardt, R. den Hartog, I. Hepburn, W. Hermsen, J. Hjorth, H. Hoekstra, A. Holland, A. Hornstrup, A. van der Horst, A. Hoshino, J. in 't Zand, K. Irwin, Y. Ishisaki, P. Jonker, T. Kitayama, H. Kawahara, N. Kawai, R. Kelley, C. Kilbourne, P. de Korte, A. Kusenko, I. Kuvvetli, M. Labanti, C. Macculi, R. Maiolino, M. Mas Hesse, K. Matsushita, P. Mazzotta, D. McCammon, M. Méndez, R. Mignani, T. Mineo, K. Mitsuda, R. Mushotzky, S. Molendi, L. Moscardini, L. Natalucci, F. Nicastro, P. O'Brien, J. Osborne, F. Paerels, M. Page, S. Paltani, K. Pedersen, E. Perinati, T. Ponman, E. Pointecouteau, P. Predehl, S. Porter, A. Rasmussen, G. Rauw, H. Röttgering, M. Roncarelli, P. Rosati, E. Quadrini, O. Ruchayskiy, R. Salvaterra, S. Sasaki, K. Sato, S. Savaglio, J. Schaye, S. Sciortino, M. Shaposhnikov, R. Sharples, K. Shinozaki, D. Spiga, R. Sunyaev, Y. Suto, Y. Takei, N. Tanvir, M. Tashiro, T. Tamura, Y. Tawara, E. Troja, M. Tsujimoto, T. Tsuru, P. Ubertini, J. Ullom, E. Ursino, F. Verbunt, F. van de Voort, M. Viel, S. Wachter, D. Watson, M. Weisskopf, N. Werner, N. White, R. Willingale, R. Wijers, N. Yamasaki, K. Yoshikawa, S. Zane
    ORIGIN is a proposal for the M3 mission call of ESA aimed at the study of metal creation from the epoch of cosmic dawn. Using high-spectral resolution in the soft X-ray band, ORIGIN will be able to identify the physical conditions of all abundant elements between C and Ni to red-shifts of z=10, and beyond. The mission will answer questions such as: When were the first metals created? How does the cosmic metal content evolve? Where do most of the metals reside in the Universe? What is the role of metals in structure formation and evolution? To reach out to the early Universe ORIGIN will use Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) to study their local environments in their host galaxies. This requires the capability to slew the satellite in less than a minute to the GRB location. By studying the chemical composition and properties of clusters of galaxies we can extend the range of exploration to lower redshifts (z ~ 0.2). For this task we need a high-resolution spectral imaging instrument with a large field of view. Using the same instrument, we can also study the so far only partially detected baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The less dense part of the WHIM will be studied using absorption lines at low redshift in the spectra for GRBs.
  • We assess the possibility to detect and characterize the physical state of the missing baryons at low redshift by analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra of the Gamma Ray Burst [GRB] afterglows, measured by a micro calorimeters-based detector with 3 eV resolution and 1000 cm2 effective area and capable of fast re-pointing, similar to that on board of the recently proposed X-ray satellites EDGE and XENIA. For this purpose we have analyzed mock absorption spectra extracted from different hydrodynamical simulations used to model the properties of the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium [WHIM]. These models predict the correct abundance of OVI absorption lines observed in UV and satisfy current X-ray constraints. According to these models space missions like EDGE and XENIA should be able to detect about 60 WHIM absorbers per year through the OVII line. About 45 % of these have at least two more detectable lines in addition to OVII that can be used to determine the density and the temperature of the gas. Systematic errors in the estimates of the gas density and temperature can be corrected for in a robust, largely model-independent fashion. The analysis of the GRB absorption spectra collected in three years would also allow to measure the cosmic mass density of the WHIM with about 15 % accuracy, although this estimate depends on the WHIM model. Our results suggest that GRBs represent a valid, if not preferable, alternative to Active Galactic Nuclei to study the WHIM in absorption. The analysis of the absorption spectra nicely complements the study of the WHIM in emission that the spectrometer proposed for EDGE and XENIA would be able to carry out thanks to its high sensitivity and large field of view.
  • The amount of detected baryons in the local Universe is at least a factor of two smaller than measured at high redshift. It is believed that a significant fraction of the baryons in the current Universe is "hiding" in a hot filamentary structure filling the intergalactic space, the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium ($WHIM$). We found evidence of the missing baryons in the $WHIM$ by detecting their signature on the angular correlation of diffuse X-ray emission with the XMM-Newton satellite. Our result indicates that $(12\pm 5)$% of the total diffuse X-ray emission in the energy range 0.4-0.6 keV is due to intergalactic filaments. The statistical significance of our detection is several sigmas ($\chi ^2>136$ N=19). The error bar in the X-ray flux is dominated, instead, by cosmic variation and model uncertainties.
  • We analyzed two XMM-Newton observations in the direction of the high density, high latitude, neutral hydrogen cloud MBM20 and of a nearby low density region that we called the Eridanus hole. The cloud MBM20 is at a distance evaluated between 100 and 200 pc from the Sun and its density is sufficiently high to shield about 75% of the foreground emission in the 3/4 keV energy band.The combination of the two observations makes possible an evaluation of the OVII and OVIII emission both for the foreground component due to the Local Bubble,and the background one, due primary to the galactic halo.The two observations are in good agreement with each other and with ROSAT observations of the same part of the sky and the OVII and OVIII fluxes are OVII=3.89+/-0.56 photons cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1, OVIII=0.68+/-0.24 photons cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for MBM20 and OVII=7.26+/-0.34 photons cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1,OVIII=1.63+/-0.17 photons cm^-2 s^-1 sr^-1 for the Eridanus hole. The spectra are in agreement with a simple three component model, one unabsorbed and one absorbed plasma component, and a power law, without evidence for any strong contamination from ion exchange in the solar system. Assuming that the two plasma components are in thermal equilibrium we obtain a temperature of 0.096 keV for the foreground component and 0.197 keV for the background one. Assuming the foreground component is due solely to Local Bubble emission we obtain a lower and upper limit for the plasma density of 0.0079 cm^-3 and 0.0095 cm^-3 and limits of 16,200 cm^-3 K and 19,500 cm^-3 K for the plasma pressure, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Similarly, assuming that the absorbed plasma component is due to Galactic halo emission, we obtain a plasma density ranging from 0.0009 cm^-3 to 0.0016 cm^-3, and a pressure ranging from 3.0*10^3 to 6.7*10^3 cm^-3 K.
  • The number of detected baryons in the Universe at z<0.5 is much smaller than predicted by standard big bang nucleosynthesis and by the detailed observation of the Lyman alpha forest at red-shift z=2. Hydrodynamical simulations indicate that a large fraction of the baryons today is expected to be in a ``warm-hot'' (10^5-10^7K) filamentary gas, distributed in the intergalactic medium. This gas, if it exists, should be observable only in the soft X-ray and UV bands. Using the predictions of a particular hydrodynamic model, we simulated the expected X-ray flux as a function of energy in the 0.1-2 keV band due to the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), and compared it with the flux from local and high red-shift diffuse components. Our results show that as much as 20% of the total diffuse X-ray background (DXB) in the energy range 0.37-0.925keV could be due to X-ray flux from the WHIM, 70% of which comes from filaments at redshift z between 0.1 and 0.6. Simulations done using a FOV of 3', comparable with that of Suzaku and Constellation-X, show that in more than 20% of the observations we expect the WHIM flux to contribute to more than 20% of the DXB. These simulations also show that in about 10% of all the observations a single bright filament in the FOV accounts, alone, for more than 20% of the DXB flux. Red-shifted oxygen lines should be clearly visible in these observations.