• Anticipating the kinematic constraints from the Gaia mission, we perform an extensive numerical study of the evolution of massive binary systems to predict the peculiar velocities that stars obtain when their companion collapses and disrupts the system. Our aim is to (1) identify which predictions are robust against model uncertainties and assess their implications, (2) investigate which physical processes leave a clear imprint and may therefore be constrained observationally and (3) provide a suite of publicly available model predictions. We find that $22_{-8}^{+26}$% of all massive binary systems merge prior to the first core collapse in the system. Of the remainder, $86_{-9}^{+11}$% become unbound because of the core-collapse. Remarkably, this rarely produce runaway stars (i.e., stars with velocities above 30 km/s). These are outnumbered by more than an order of magnitude by slower unbound companions, or "walkaway stars". This is a robust outcome of our simulations and is due to the reversal of the mass ratio prior to the explosion and widening of the orbit, as we show analytically and numerically. We estimate a $10^{+5}_{-8}$% of massive stars to be walkaways and only $0.5^{+1.0}_{-0.4}$% to be runaways, nearly all of which have accreted mass from their companion. Our findings are consistent with earlier studies, however the low runaway fraction we find is in tension with observed fractions 10%. If Gaia confirms these high fractions of massive runaway stars resulting from binaries, it would imply that we are currently missing physics in the binary models. Finally, we show that high end of the mass distributions of runaway stars is very sensitive to the assumed black hole natal kicks and propose this as a potentially stringent test for the explosion mechanism. We discuss companions remaining bound which can evolve into X-ray and gravitational wave sources.
  • Stripped-envelope stars (SESs) form in binary systems after losing mass through Roche-lobe overflow. They bear astrophysical significance as sources of UV and ionizing radiation in older stellar populations and, if sufficiently massive, as stripped supernova progenitors. Binary evolutionary models predict them to be common, but only a handful of subdwarfs (i.e., SESs) with B-type companions are known. This could be the result of observational biases hindering detection, or an incorrect understanding of binary evolution. We reanalyze the well-studied post-interaction binary phi Persei. Recently, new data improved the orbital solution of the system, which contains a ~1.2 Msun SES and a rapidly rotating ~9.6 Msun Be star. We compare with an extensive grid of evolutionary models using a Bayesian approach and find initial masses of the progenitor of 7.2+/-0.4 Msun for the SES and 3.8+/-0.4 Msun for the Be star. The system must have evolved through near-conservative mass transfer. These findings are consistent with earlier studies. The age we obtain, 57+/-9 Myr, is in excellent agreement with the age of the alpha Persei cluster. We note that neither star was initially massive enough to produce a core-collapse supernova, but mass exchange pushed the Be star above the mass threshold. We find that the subdwarf is overluminous for its mass by almost an order of magnitude, compared to the expectations for a helium core burning star. We can only reconcile this if the subdwarf is in a late phase of helium shell burning, which lasts only 2-3% of the total lifetime as a subdwarf. This could imply that up to ~50 less evolved, dimmer subdwarfs exist for each system similar to phi Persei. Our findings can be interpreted as a strong indication that a substantial population of SESs indeed exists, but has so far evaded detection because of observational biases and lack of large-scale systematic searches.
  • Stars stripped of their envelope through interaction in a binary are generally not considered when accounting for ionizing radiation from stellar populations, despite the expectation that stripped stars emit hard ionizing radiation, form frequently and live 10-100 times longer than single massive stars. We compute the first grid of spectral models specially made for stars stripped in binaries for a range of progenitor masses (2-20$M_{\odot}$) and metallicities covering a wide range. For stripped stars with masses between 0.3-7$M_{\odot}$, we find high effective temperatures (20-100 kK, increasing with mass), small radii (0.2-1$R_{\odot}$) and high bolometric luminosities, comparable to that of their progenitor before stripping. The spectra show a continuous sequence that naturally bridges subdwarf-type stars and Wolf-Rayet like spectra. For intermediate masses we find hybrid spectral classes showing a mixture of absorption and emission lines. These appear for stars with mass loss rates of $10^{-8}-10^{-6}M_{\odot}$/yr, which have semi-transparent atmospheres. At low metallicity, substantial H-rich layers are left at the surface and we predict spectra that resemble O-type stars instead. We obtain spectra undistinguishable from subdwarfs for stripped stars with masses up to 1.7$M_{\odot}$, which questions whether the widely adopted canonical value of 0.47$M_{\odot}$ is uniformly valid. Increasing the observed sample of stripped stars will provide necessary tests for the physics of interaction, internal mixing and stellar winds. We investigate the feasibility to detect stripped stars next to an optically bright companion and recommend searches for their UV excess and possible emission lines, most notably HeII4686 in the optical and HeII1640 in the UV. Our models are publicly available for further investigations or inclusion in spectral synthesis simulations.
  • Many young, massive stars are found in close binaries. Using population synthesis simulations we predict the likelihood of a companion star being present when these massive stars end their lives as core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We focus on stripped-envelope SNe, whose progenitors have lost their outer hydrogen and possibly helium layers before explosion. We use these results to interpret new Hubble Space Telescope observations of the site of the broad-lined Type Ic SN 2002ap, 14 years post-explosion. For a subsolar metallicity consistent with SN 2002ap, we expect a main-sequence companion present in about two thirds of all stripped-envelope SNe and a compact companion (likely a stripped helium star or a white dwarf/neutron star/black hole) in about 5% of cases. About a quarter of progenitors are single at explosion (originating from initially single stars, mergers or disrupted systems). All the latter scenarios require a massive progenitor, inconsistent with earlier studies of SN 2002ap. Our new, deeper upper limits exclude the presence of a main-sequence companion star $>8$-$10$ Msun, ruling out about 40% of all stripped-envelope SN channels. The most likely scenario for SN 2002ap includes nonconservative binary interaction of a primary star initially $\lesssim 23$ Msun. Although unlikely ($<$1% of the scenarios), we also discuss the possibility of an exotic reverse merger channel for broad-lined Type Ic events. Finally, we explore how our results depend on the metallicity and the model assumptions and discuss how additional searches for companions can constrain the physics that governs the evolution of SN progenitors.
  • Most massive stars, the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, are in close binary systems and may interact with their companion through mass transfer or merging. We undertake a population synthesis study to compute the delay-time distribution of core-collapse supernovae, that is, the supernova rate versus time following a starburst, taking into account binary interactions. We test the systematic robustness of our results by running various simulations to account for the uncertainties in our standard assumptions. We find that a significant fraction, $15^{+9}_{-8}$%, of core-collapse supernovae are `late', that is, they occur 50-200 Myrs after birth, when all massive single stars have already exploded. These late events originate predominantly from binary systems with at least one, or, in most cases, with both stars initially being of intermediate mass ($4-8M_{\odot}$). The main evolutionary channels that contribute often involve either the merging of the initially more massive primary star with its companion or the engulfment of the remaining core of the primary by the expanding secondary that has accreted mass at an earlier evolutionary stage. Also, the total number of core-collapse supernovae increases by $14^{+15}_{-14}$% because of binarity for the same initial stellar mass. The high rate implies that we should have already observed such late core-collapse supernovae, but have not recognized them as such. We argue that $\phi$ Persei is a likely progenitor and that eccentric neutron star - white dwarf systems are likely descendants. Late events can help explain the discrepancy in the delay-time distributions derived from supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds and extragalactic type Ia events, lowering the contribution of prompt Ia events. We discuss ways to test these predictions and speculate on the implications for supernova feedback in simulations of galaxy evolution.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of SN2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays. SN2014C was the explosion of an H-stripped progenitor star with ordinary explosion parameters. However, over the time scale of ~1yr, SN2014C experienced a complete metamorphosis and evolved from an ordinary H-poor supernova of type Ib into a strongly interacting, H-rich supernova of type IIn. Signatures of the SN shock interacting with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum. Coordinated observations with Swift, Chandra and NuSTAR have captured the evolution in detail and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ~1 Msun of hydrogen-rich material at ~6d16 cm from the explosion site. We estimate that the shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before core collapse. This result poses significant challenges to current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last stages of nuclear burning in massive stars as potential triggers of the time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN2014C-like signatures in ~10% of SNe with constraining radio data. This fraction is somewhat larger but reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution IF the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 1000-10000 yrs. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending all the way to the core C-burning phase might also play a critical role.